Young Bruins impress in developmental camp

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Young Bruins impress in developmental camp

By Joe Haggerty
CSNNE.com Bruins Insider Follow @hackswithhaggs
WILMINGTON It was a brief respite to be sure, but little more than a month after capturing the Stanley Cup the Bruins were back on the ice at their practice facility in Ristuccia Arena.

It wasnt the Cup-winning Bs, of course. They have scattered to the four corners of the earth for the next six weeks before they have to return for training camp in September. But the baby Bs have taken their place.

First-round pick Dougie Hamilton took his first twirls in a Bruins uniform, promising forwards Jared Knight and Ryan Spooner returned a year bigger, stronger and determined to make a push for a roster spot, and Bs fans got their first look at the man they call Koko 2011 second-round draft pick and Russian winger Alexander Khokhlachev.

Knight and Spooner showed off the sizzling wrist shots that caught the eyes of the Bruins staff last fall during training camp, and Knight in particular looked like hes packed on some muscle for an important training camp. The 2010 second round pick has even taken up triathlons this summer as a way to vary his conditioning and exercise while getting ready for a run at a Bs roster spot.

Knight, 19, showed he can take the puck toward the cage with force, and the 5-foot-11, 202-pounder smashed into goalie Michael Hutchinson in the biggest collision on the ice during the entire Thursday afternoon practice session.

Your hopes are that everybody gets away healthy, first of all, said Bs assistant general manager Don Sweeney. Obviously Jared drives to the net and its probably typical. I was talking to Doug and Marc Cantin, two guys in the OHL, and it wasnt any surprise to them that it was Knight who ran into Hutch Michael Hutchinson. But Mikes fine and Jareds not going to change his game.

"I think overall we have fresh faces in here, we have some older guys who are returning -- and you hope that you blend that together right away. Maybe some of the older guys kind of, you know, give them a little heads-up because some of these kids are coming in here wide-eyed. You tell them that the Bruins are here to learn about you, youre here to learn about the Bruins and how we do things, and then learn about yourself and where you need to go between now and September. Wherever youre going to go play we want you to be a sponge throughout the course of the week. There are a lot of teaching moments that happen throughout the course of this week that you should really file away and learn from.

Hamilton drew the biggest crowd around his locker stall immediately after the first day of practice, but despite all the fanfare, its pretty clear he knows theres a long road of development ahead of him. He showed off the smooth skating ability and the powerful shot, but he said that theres plenty to do before hes ready to make a run at an NHL roster spot.

I definitely have to get stronger. Ive grown a lot in the last few years in my bantam year I was 5-foot-9, 145-pounds and that was four or five years ago and get used to that, said Hamilton. There are times when youre a little uncoordinated, and Im just trying to fill out into my body. There are a lot of college guys here and Im a little undeveloped while being one of the youngest guys here. But Im happy for my own personal goals and what Ive done.

You learn about yourself. You learn about what you need to improve on. I think the coaches are going to help me out, and show me some things that I can incorporate and work on for the rest of the summer. Thats what Im trying to do.

While its always difficult to gauge defensemen during development camp drills, Sweeney liked what he was of the youngster as he makes first impressions with the Boston staff this week.

Hes a big boy. He moves really well for a kid thats 6-foot-4. I like his overall approach to the game. He looks like he wants to get up ice and is conscientious about his one-on-one play, said Sweeney. Its a small sample size, obviously, but based on all of our games we watched him play, hes a well-rounded player that has a lot of room for continued development. Were really excited to have him.

There is plenty of excitement about the entire next wave of Bs players represented at the development camp this week, and thats big news considering 18 members of the defending Stanley Cup champs will be returning for another kick at the Cup next season.

Joe Haggerty can be reached at jhaggerty@comcastsportsnet.com. Follow Joe on Twitter at http:twitter.comHackswithHaggs

Source: Bruins preparing offer sheet for Jets D-man Jacob Trouba

Source: Bruins preparing offer sheet for Jets D-man Jacob Trouba

According to a hockey source, Don Sweeney and the Boston Bruins “are preparing an offer sheet” this week for Winnipeg Jets defenseman Jacob Trouba as an aggressive option to land a No. 1 defenseman after trades didn’t pan out at last weekend’s NHL Draft.

The Bruins have watched Trouba closely for some time, and clearly have an interest in the 22-year-old D-man with size, offensive abilities and a workhorse nature that’s seen him average more than 22 minutes of ice time per game since entering the league as a 19-year-old.

Trouba is coming off a six-goal, 21-point season while playing in 81 games for the Jets, and was a career-best plus-10 for Winnipeg. With Trouba, a restricted free agent, and the Jets locked into big money deals to fellow right shot D-men in Dustin Byfuglien and Tyler Myers, the writing has been on the wall for some time that the Jets would need to give one of them up.

Now it appears the Bruins may be willing to put their money, and their assets, where their interest is, and come up with an offer sheet that totals a minimum of $47 million for Trouba’s services.

Part of that high total is crafting an offer that the Winnipeg Jets aren’t going to match, and part of that is the Bruins’ own doing while casually tossing away their own draft picks. Because they sent their 2017 third round pick to the Flyers for Zac Rinaldo and their 2017 second round pick to New Jersey for Lee Stempniak, the Bruins must put together an offer sheet with an average annual value (AAV) of at least $9.3 million that will require Boston to give up four consecutive first round picks as compensation.

The good news for the Bruins: for offer sheet purposes, AAV is determined by dividing the total compensation offered by the lesser of the length of the contract, or by five. For contracts longer than five years in term, this will result in a higher AAV than simply dividing the contract total by the number of years.

Example: a 7 year offer sheet worth $49 million total, would be considered an AAV of $9.8 million ($49 million divided by 5) for offer sheet compensation purposes. That means the Bruins could make an offer sheet to Trouba in the $7-8 million per season neighborhood on a seven year deal, a reasonable contract if Trouba turns into the No. 1 defenseman that the B’s are envisioning.

The real price for the Black and Gold would be surrendering four first round picks, but the Bruins have made five first round picks in the last two years while stockpiling their prospect cupboard. The B’s have also been hit-or-miss with their first round picks, so sacrificing a few of them for a surefire, young defenseman would theoretically be worth the price.

Clearly the offer sheet route is the product of Bruins’ frustration at being unable to broker a deal for Kevin Shattenkirk or Cam Fowler last weekend in Buffalo, and at the realization that they need a stud No. 1 defenseman in order to again be competitive in the Eastern Conference. Perhaps even the threat of an offer sheet could spur the Jets into dealing Trouba, just as the threat of an offer sheet pushed forward the trades of Dougie Hamilton and Brandon Saad last season. 

Dirty Water Media Bruins reporter James Murphy was also reporting the buzz that the B's are exploring their offer sheet option. 

Bruins go for size, defensive presence at center with Koppanen

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Bruins go for size, defensive presence at center with Koppanen

While the Bruins fourth round pick might sound eerily like Finnish fourth line center Joonas Kemppainen, the Black and Gold are hoping for much more from fifth round pick (135th overall) Joona Koppanen. The 6-foot-5, 194-pound Finnish center is obviously a big body in the middle of the ice, and already plays a responsible, smart game on the defensive side of the ice.

In keeping with the parallels to Kemppainen, Koppanen is a bit less developed on the offensive side of the game at this point in his young career as an 18-year-old.  

“I think that the draft was awesome and I’m really excited for the draft to Boston,” said Koppanen, who added “Tuukka Rask plays there” when asked what he knows about the Bruins. “My strength is to skating and I’m a good two-way forward.”

The Big Finn had nine goals and 26 points in 40 games for the junior team in Finland last season, and was shut out in seven games for Team Finland at the World Junior U-18 Championships. So he’s got some work to do developing his offensive game and getting both bigger and stronger, but the Bruins see size, strength and the work ethic to improve in Koppanen.

“He’s a big guy, and for a big guy he can really move around. He’s very good defensively and smart with his positioning. He plays hard,” said Bruins head scout Keith Gretzky. “The skill is the one area that needs to develop, and we think it’s going to do that. He was a guy that we targeted because he’s a big guy that can skate, and is good in his own end.”

One thing the Bruins focused on heading into the draft was acquiring some size at the center position, and they’ve clearly done that with 6-foot-2, 200-pound Trent Frederic and the 6-foot-5, 198-pound Koppanen.

It just remains to be seen what kind of offensive upside these gritty, tough competitors will have once they reach the pro ranks a few years from now, and that will go a long way to determining how good these picks end up being.

One thing is for sure: they must be projecting that Koppanen is better than Kemppainen, who was an absolute bust in the offensive zone.