Paoletti: It IS Bruins hockey; it just looks a little different

Paoletti: It IS Bruins hockey; it just looks a little different

By Mary Paoletti
CSNNE.com

PRAGUE -- Step off the elevator and onto the drab concrete of the concourse. Breathe deeply.

Popcorn. That classic arena smell.

Huge signs over kiosks say "HOT DOGS" in block letters. Fans in hockey jerseys shift from one foot to the other while they wait in line. It's almost game time. It's almost time to step inside and feel that chill, cast your eyes down on that gorgeous sheet of ice.

For the moment, it's unscarred. In the shine you can see blurred reflections of the Bruins logos that glow on the 360 display halo. You stop and look down to take the scene in. And then your eyes move up.

Someone said that the designers visited most or all of the arenas in the United States to get ideas for the O2. But where they got the idea for rafters like this . . . ?

It should be so daunting. The visual elements for a European NHL premier are as impressive as you would imagine. And the fans dress the part, too.

In a single row sit seven fans wearing seven different hockey sweaters: Capitals, Sharks, Coyotes, Bruins, Ducks, Blues, Lightning. There are German STURM jerseys and Czech JAGR jerseys. These people are radiating excitement. They want to see hockey -- North American hockey.

But for the majority, the passion is for the plays and not the players. A few hundred Phoenix and Boston fans traveled from the U.S. to watch their home teams square off; the other thousands who fill balcony and trickle on down? Locals. Europeans.

This is how you know you aren't in Kansas (or Pittsburgh or Washington) anymore. The crowd applauds when they should -- for big hits and bigger goals -- so you know these people know the sport. There's just no general "Garden noise."

Cheers die as soon as they're born. The attempted "BOSTON! BOSTON! BOSTON!" chant doesn't seem to be taken seriously. Maybe because it sounds weird with a Czech accent. (BOHS-TOHN! BOHS-TOHN!)

And did you ever imagine that the in-game music would throw you off? It's as though the sound crew did a Google search for "American hockey soundtrack" to make the playlist but the search results returned "Stereotypical American warm-up songs" instead.

Scorpions - "Rock you like a hurricane"
Reel 2 Reel - "I like to move it"
Michael Jackson - "Beat it"
Survivor - "Eye of the tiger"
Lucas - "Lucas with the lid off"

At least one of them is comforting: Zombie Nation. Even if you hate it 90 percent of the time, when the Bruins light the lamp and that tune comes on . . . well, you're probably doing this:

You knew things would be different, though. It's just nice that the important things are the same.

Mary Paoletti can be reached at mpaoletti@comcastsportsnet.com. Follow Mary on Twitter at http:twitter.comMary_Paoletti

Penguins edge Sharks 3-2 in Game 1 of Stanley Cup Final

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Penguins edge Sharks 3-2 in Game 1 of Stanley Cup Final

PITTSBURGH - Nick Bonino's main job for the Pittsburgh Penguins is to get to the front of the net and create chaos. The well-bearded forward executed perfectly in his debut in the Stanley Cup Final.

Bonino took a pretty feed from the corner by Kris Letang and beat Martin Jones from in close with 2:33 remaining to lift the Penguins to a 3-2 victory over the San Jose Sharks in Game 1 on Monday night.

Rookies Bryan Rust and Conor Sheary staked Pittsburgh to an early two-goal lead before the Sharks tied it in the second period on goals by Tomas Hertl and Patrick Marleau. The Penguins responded by upping the pressure in the final period and it paid off with Bonino's fourth goal of the playoffs after he darted to the San Jose net in time to knuckle Letang's pass by Jones for the winner.

Game 2 is Wednesday night in Pittsburgh.

Matt Murray finished with 24 saves for Pittsburgh, which began its bid for the fourth title in franchise history by peppering Jones constantly in the first and final periods. Jones made 38 stops but couldn't get his blocker on Bonino's wrist shot. The Penguins threw 41 shots at Jones, well over the 28 he faced on average during San Jose's playoff run.

The Sharks made it to the first Stanley Cup Final in franchise history by rebuilding themselves on the fly. Two years removed from a brutal collapse from a 3-0 series lead in the first round against Los Angeles, San Jose ended a 9,005 day wait to play in the NHL's championship round by relying on a tough, aggressive style that squeezes opponents with a relentless forecheck while limiting chances in front of Jones.

Yet veterans Marleau and Joe Thornton - the top two picks in the 1997 draft held in Pittsburgh who had waited nearly two decades to make it to the league's biggest stage - insisted the Sharks were hardly satisfied after dispatching St. Louis in a cathartic Western Conference finals.

Maybe, but the Sharks looked a step slow - maybe two steps slow - while searching for their footing against the Penguins, who rallied from a 3-2 deficit to edge the Tampa Bay Lightning in seven games to advance to their first Cup Final since 2009.

Rust, who surprisingly made the team out of training camp and became an unlikely playoff star by scoring both of Pittsburgh's goals in Game 7 against the Lightning, gave the Penguins the lead 12:46 into the first when he slammed home a rebound off a Justin Schultz shot for his sixth of the postseason, a franchise record for playoff goals by a rookie.

Less than a minute later Sheary, who didn't become a regular until the middle of January, made it 2-0 when Sidney Crosby whipped a blind backhand cross-ice pass to Sheary's stick. The rookie's wrist shot from the right circle zipped by Jones and the Penguins appeared to be in complete command by overwhelming the Sharks in a way few have in months.

San Jose and its group of Cup newcomers regained its composure in the intermission and responded with a big surge. Hertl jammed a shot from just outside the crease between Murray's legs on the power play 3:02 into the second to give the Sharks momentum. Late in the second, Marleau collected a rebound off a Brent Burns one-timer behind the Pittsburgh net and then beat Murray on a wraparound to the far post that caromed off Murray's extended right leg and into the net.