Notes: B's attempt to cure ailing power play

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Notes: B's attempt to cure ailing power play

By JoeHaggerty
CSNNE.com

LAKE PLACID, N.Y. Tomas Kaberle was supposed to be the pass-happy antidote for what ailed the Bruins' power play once Marc Savard was down and out with another concussion.

Sure, it was solving the power-play problem with a player who was very different from Savard, but what could go wrong?

By removing a power-play specialist like Savard running things along the side of the formation and replacing him with a true power-play quarterback from the point spot, the Bruins were going outside the box a little bit.

Kaberles power-play track record was unquestioned, and it appeared hed form a dream team up top with Zdeno Chara for a series of blistering one-timers opening up chances for the forwards working around the net.

Instead its been exactly the opposite. The forwards have relaxed on the man advantage and perhaps put too much reliance in the KaberleChara connection. Ever since PK units started taking away Charas big shot, the Bruins' power play has sputtered to a stop.

Its a problem neither the coaches nor the on-ice personnel have been able to solve, and its beginning to look like a fatal flaw if they cant start figuring it out.

The Bruins are 0-for-11 in three playoff games on the power play, and Boston is a pitiful 7-for-77 on the PP since Kaberle arrived in Boston 27 games ago in a deal that sent Joe Colborne, a first-round pick and a conditional draft pick to the Toronto Maple Leafs.

Thats a 9 percent success rate . . . or a 91 percent failure rate, if youre a pessimistic voice around the Bs brigade.

There have been whispers the 33-year-old Kaberle didnt arrive in Boston in the greatest conditioning shape, and he certainly hasnt done anything to quell criticism of game since he donned a Black and Gold sweater.

General manager Peter Chiarelli was asked point blankWednesday morning if Kaberle and the newly constructed Bs power playhave been disappointing since Kaberle's February arrival, and the GMwasnt pulling any punches.

Has he been a disappointment? He hasnt played up to the level that we expected, said Chiarelli during a radio interview with 98.5 the Sports Hubs Toucher and Rich Show. There have been parts of his game where he hasnt played in the playoffs for a while, and some of those bad habits have stuck with him. We expected better.

If Montreals penalty-kill unit has managed to squelch the Kaberle-to-Chara connection then that should create plenty of room for the rest of the new-look first power play unit.

But that hasnt happened at all.

Its a lot of everything. Weve just got to move the puck a little better and a get a little less predictable, said coach Claude Julien. I say that all the time. If were standing around then we get very easy to defend against.

The guys have to be moving a little bit more and create a little bit more insecurity for the PK. Right now we havent been doing that well enough. If they want to take away the Chara one-timer then other options should be opening up. Its up to us to make them work.

During Wednesday's practice, Julien and power-play architect Geoff Ward opted to insert Patrice Bergeron as a gritty, active body down low near the net along with Milan Lucic as David Krejci moves it off the half-wall. Bergeron called it a tune up for the man advantage after practice, but it was more than that.

Perhaps it was the sweet Bergeron-to-Krejci connection for Bostons first goal in Montreal in Game 3 that inspired the change, or simply that Bergeron is winning battles all over the ice. Either way it means Nathan Horton is off the power play, and the rest of the Bruins are given the task of creating more chances around the net with their skill forwards.

Bergeron has been Bostons best forward over the first three games, and its high time they get his hands, strong stick and fearlessness onto the power play team.

Its the same old thing. Youve got to get ugly. We see the video. We see what theyre doing and now weve got to execute, said Recchi, who skated with the second power-play unit along with Michael Ryder, Brad Marchand, Rich Peverley, Dennis Seidenberg and Andrew Ference. Weve got to shoot it at the right time, and weve got to pass it at the right time. Youve got to have support all over the ice, and all it takes is one ugly goal to really get things going. Hopefully things will turn for us."

The playoff familiarity means opponents have scouted the power-play formations and know a teams predictable patterns, but that also means a team like Boston can cross the Canadiens up with something out of the ordinary. Something as simple as point players slipping toward the net on a backdoor play, or forwards rotating spots down low could give a penalty kill unit that little bit of needed uncertainty.

I dont play with him very much with Chara because Im on a different unit, but they really do try to take away that one time shot for the most part, said Recchi. That means there are 4-on-3s everywhere else on the ice. With movement youve got to be able to 2-on-1 people all over the ice and youve got to go at people creating 2-on-1s.

If you do that then youre going to be better off. Eventually those things open up. Zee opens up for the shot and its there, but youve got to show them you do other things before theyll start respecting it. Then youll start finding shots all over the ice.

The only positive: The Bruins and Kaberle cant get much worse on the power play than theyve been during the first three games against Montreal.

Also, the Bruins are not allowing the Canadiens to score on special teams, either.

Chara indicated that hes feeling much better when he was asked multiple times about his health and the virus that caused him to suffer from severe dehydration prior to Game 2 in Boston. The big defenseman played 26-plus minutes and took advantage of a pair of days between games to gather strength and ready himself for a dramatic Game Four at the Bell Centre on Thursday night.

Its always a physical game, said Chara. The playoffs are always physical. You have to find the balance between being relaxed and finding your focus in Lake Placid.

The Bruins left the Olympic Center at Lake Placid following Wednesdays practice and rolled up Route 87 via bus for the two-hour ride back to Montreal, and Julien said he felt the team had accomplished all it had hoped for. While the Bs considered Burlington, Vermont and several Canadian outposts before opting for the Lake Placid locale, the ultimate choice by Julien, Chiarelli, Cam Neely and the rest of the Bs front office was a wise one.

What we wanted to accomplish was to come down here, get a little rest and have a quality practice and then head back to Montreal, said Julien. I saw guys walking around yesterday and they seemed really relaxed. Thats the best way to keep yourself fresh for the playoffs. We enjoyed the few days we spent here. It was a positive trip.

Horton feels like hes calmed down a bit after getting a couple of playoff games under his belt, and notching the goal in Game 3 has certainly helped him. There was some thought Horton hurt his collarbone area at the end of the game, but said he was fine and ready to go.

Its exciting for us and exciting to be a part of, said Horton. Were looking forward to the challenge of Game 4.

We played at times the way we wanted to play, and sometimes we let off. You can tell when were playing good and playing with confidence and playing relaxed. Its about putting pucks in the right places, and thats how we want to play.

Joe Haggerty can be reached at jhaggerty@comcastsportsnet.com.Follow Joe on Twitter at http:twitter.comHackswithHaggs

"Everything is on track" with Bruins prospect Zboril

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"Everything is on track" with Bruins prospect Zboril

Little more than a year after he was drafted in the middle of the first round by the Boston Bruins, some are whispering that 19-year-old Jakub Zboril isn’t going to live up to advanced billing. Clearly the Czech defenseman took a step back for the Saint John Sea Dogs after being taken 13th by the Bruins in last year’s draft, and dropped to six goals and 20 points in 50 games in the QMJHL while watching second round pick Jeremy Lauzon pass him by on the prospect hype chart.

Perhaps the more concerning thing have been the whispers about an erratic work ethic and bad habits in Zboril’s game, a couple of criticisms that haven’t exactly gone away since the Bruins signed him to a contract last summer following development camp. Bruins assistant general manager Scott Bradley was asked about those concerns with the young D-man as he heads into an important training camp with Boston this fall, and didn’t seem all that concerned about his first round pick being a “bust.”

“I think his offensive production was down, and that he struggled a little bit coming out of the gate” said Bradley of Zboril, who had 13 goals and 33 points in 44 games during his first season in the Quebec Major Junior League prior to getting drafted by Boston. “But he had a strong playoff. Everybody forgets that he’s a gritty guy, and a strong player that moves the puck. The thing that stands out about him are that his numbers are down from last year.

“But everything is on track with him. He’s going to come to camp and hopefully shines, and has a good year this year…patience.

“I think it’s great if the second rounders are on par with him: the [Brandon] Carlos and the [Jeremy] Lauzons. If you look at the whole of our draft last year you can’t rule out the first eight picks that they might play [in the NHL]. We’re excited. Donnie and I were at the Memorial Cup, and Lauzon raised our eyebrows every night that he played. You’d come away with a good feeling like this kid plays hard, plays the Bruins style, moves the puck and is tough. Obviously [you had to like] what Carlo did when he was brought in [to Providence] at the end. It just bodes well for what we have coming this year. Zboril and Lauzon are probably going back to junior, but Carlo is going to get a long look.”

The young Czech D-man is still at a point where his stock can still shoot higher than it’s ever been with a good showing at training camp, and a strong season for the Sea Dogs entering into his professional hockey career. But he can’t afford to go through another down season, or that talk of him being a first round bust is only going to get louder and stronger.

Morning Skate: Stamkos destined to wind up somewhere new

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Morning Skate: Stamkos destined to wind up somewhere new

Here are the links from all around the hockey world, and what I’m reading while happy to be back in the city of Boston.

*The Buffalo Sabres don’t sound happy about the accusations against Evander Kane that cropped up during NHL Draft weekend, why would they be?

*NHL teams can now start discussing free agents, exchanging ideas with them and start the chase up to July 1.

*PHT writer James O’Brien has the biggest winners in the 2016 NHL Draft. Here’s a shocker: the Bruins aren’t among them.

*A good piece from Alex Prewitt on the importance of the land line phones on the draft floor during NHL Draft weekend.

*The Edmonton Oilers are another team that didn’t come out of draft weekend with a defenseman, and are still in search of their back end help.

*A nice piece on Philadelphia Flyers draft pick Pascal Laberge, who could have been plucked by the Bruins at No. 29 rather than Trent Frederic.

*Bruce Garrioch has his Sunday NHL notes, and says that Steven Stamkos appears destined to play somewhere other than Tampa Bay.

*For something completely different: Jonah Keri has TV critic Alan Sepinwall on his podcast, and one can only hope it’s to explain how and why he could have disliked last week’s episode of Game of Thrones.