No lineup changes expected for Bruins, Flyers

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No lineup changes expected for Bruins, Flyers

By Joe Haggerty
CSNNE.com
PHILADELPHIA Its round two of an anticipated seven round fight between the Bruins and the Flyers, and there doesnt appear to be much in the way of changes for either side.The Bruins wont have any changes on their end, and only Mark Recchi was missing from the morning skate at the Wells Fargo Center as he took a well-deserved veteran exception as a 43-year-old playing deep into the postseason. Nathan Horton was back on the ice for the Bruins after missing yesterday with a broken skate, and Tim Thomas will be in goal for a Bs team simply worrying about their own business. "I dont think theres any secret to how hard this game is gonna be, and how tough this series is going to be, Andrew Ference said. We just have to take care of our own backyard first. It doesnt matter what system youre running if you dont bring energy and work with you as a team. Thats something we have to make sure we do.The Flyers were missing Chris Pronger and Jeff Carter from the ice at morning skate, but sources told CSNPhilly.coms Sarah Baicker that Pronger would play despite missing the last handful of minutes from Game 1 and walking up the runway to the dressing room with a couple of minutes left in the game.Brian Boucher will get the start between the pipes after getting yanked during the second period of Game One, and the Flyers goaltending carousel continues. Flyers coach Peter Laviolette said it was a chance for the entire team -- Boucher included -- to wipe away the stain of a wretched Game One. "Brian will go back in net today," said Laviolette. "Today for me is a game where we all have to go back in there and try and right some wrongs. Everybody gets an opportunity and he deserves it."It sure looks like a fatal flaw in the series with the journeymen Boucher carrying a .783 save percentage into Game 2, but Claude Julien wasnt going to look at that as something the Bs could count on.They pulled goalies in the last round and they still managed to win their series, Julien said. We know thats something that has happened with this team since the first round, and its something that happened to them last year when they got to the Finals. Were not hanging our hat on that. Were hanging our hat on how were going to handle our own situation, and thats where were at right now. Andrew Ference had the line of the day when talking about the emails and texts he was sending out last night and this morning upon hearing about the death of Osama Bin Laden. Ference has befriended a group of US Army Rangers in Massachusetts that are also Bruins fans, and one had texted the Bs defenseman over the last couple of weeks that they were going out hunting for bad guys. It was the CIA and the Navy Seals that eventually took out Bin Laden, but Ference said he could sense the relief in his friends after theyd spent many sleepless nights hunting after the evil mastermind behind the 911 attacks.Ference also said he asked a few friends that were in contact with Barack Obama to put in a request for the Bruins: "I asked one of my buddies to send an email to Obama because I hear he's good at finding things, said Ference with a smile on his face. Hopefully he can help us find a power play goal."
Joe Haggerty can be reached at jhaggerty@comcastsportsnet.com. Follow Joe on Twitter at http:twitter.comHackswithHaggs

Marchand: 'No place I'd rather play' than Boston

Marchand: 'No place I'd rather play' than Boston

The Bruins made it official on Monday -- mere minutes after the news had broken -- as they clearly couldn’t wait to announce an eight year, $49 million contract extension for Brad Marchand. who is finishing up his Team Canada gig at the World Cup of Hockey.

PROFILE: Joe Haggerty's preseason look at Brad Marchand

The deal averages $6.125 million per season, broken up between actual salary and signing bonus money. The Bruins were most definitely given a hometown discount by an elite player who snapped home a career-high 37 goals and 60 points last season, the most goals scored by a Bruins player since Glenn Murray in 2002-03. And everybody knows goal scorers get paid in the NHL, even if Marchand won’t be expected to score quite that many every year.

Marchand, 28, has also been the second-leading scorer in the entire World Cup of Hockey tournament, behind only Sidney Crosby, and continues to raise his profile in the NHL world beyond his customary agitator role. The “Nose Face Killah” could have waited for until free agency if he'd wanted to pick up every last nickel on the table, but it’s very clear he’s invested in the team that drafted and developed him, and with which he won a Cup five years ago.

"This is an extremely exciting day for me and my family," said Marchand, who now has a full no-move clause for the first five years of his next contract. "I would like to thank the Jacobs family, [president] Cam Neely, [general manager] Don Sweeney, [coach] Claude Julien, the coaching staff, my teammates and our fans for their continued support and belief in me. I have been a Bruin since the start of my pro career and there is no place I would rather play. I look forward to doing everything I can to help our team achieve success and bring the Stanley Cup back to Boston."

Marchand has been among the team’s leading scorers since joining the league in 2010-11, has been the NHL’s most dangerous penalty killer over the last five years, and pairs with Patrice Bergeron to anchor the top line. He’s also become much more of a leader in the last few seasons as other character veterans have been peeled away from the core group, and a hometown discount proves it one of the most meaningful ways possible.

It was clear Marchand was invested in the Bruins when he helped recruit free agent David Backes with phone calls this summer, and he was also present for the recruiting pitch to Jimmy Vesey at Warrior Ice Arena last month.

The Bruins players at training camp were happy to hear No. 63 was going to be in Boston for the long haul.

“Marchy is Marchy. I think everybody kind of knows what that means,” said Kevan Miller. “He’s been great for our organization and great for the fans and for this city. He’s been all in since Day One, and he’s been a guy that I looked up to.”

While the Bruins have confirmed the contract, Sweeney won't weigh in until later today. But one would expect there will be an appreciation for the skill of the player, and Marchand’s commitment to the organization after accepting less than he could have gotten on the open market.

Monday, Sept. 26: So what happens if Canada loses World Cup final?

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Monday, Sept. 26: So what happens if Canada loses World Cup final?

Here are all the links from around the hockey world, and what I’m reading while finding it hard to believe that it’s game day for the Boston Bruins. Summer is officially O-V-A.
 
-- The Montreal media is starting to get on board with this tougher, grittier version of the Habs, along with a healthy Carey Price.
 
-- Pierre McGuire sits in with Ottawa’s TSN sports radio station and talks Team Europe in the World Cup, as well as a number of other things.

-- FOH (Friend of Haggs) Mike Zeisberger is already openly wondering what would happen in Canada if they lose to Team Europe in the best-of-three final to the World Cup.

-- FOH (Friend of Haggs) Puck Daddy Greg Wyshynski asks Brad Marchand if a part of him has thought about playing with Sidney Crosby on the Penguins if he hits free agency. Bells, alarms and whistles should be going off on Causeway Street to give No. 63 whatever he wants at this point. In case you missed it, I talked about the danger of Crosby trying to woo his Nova Scotian buddy to Pittsburgh last week.
 
-- PHT writer James O’Brien says it sounds like the St. Louis Blues are going to play a more aggressive brand of hockey this season.
 
-- For something completely different: Forbes Magazine says Pete Carroll, not Bill Belichick, should be considered the NFL’s foremost cheater.