Marchand: Bruins ready to 'sacrifice' and 'suffer'

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Marchand: Bruins ready to 'sacrifice' and 'suffer'

By JoeHaggerty
CSNNE.com

TAMPA The Bruins have been through this exact scenario once before, and theyre hoping they are a little wiser for it the second time around. The Bs approached a Game 6 on the road against the Montreal Canadiens in the first round of the playoffs after fighting all the way back to take a 3-2 lead in that series, and things got out of control in that game. Officiating became a huge factor with refs Kevin Pollock and Chris Lee handing out 11 penalties at the Bell Centre and Milan Lucic getting booted from the game for a boarding call, and the Bs lost a 2-1 hockey game despite playing reasonably well.You can take all kinds of situations and use them to your benefit, and thats one of them, said Claude Julien. I think we felt ready, but obviously it didnt happen. There were some penalties. I think its a matter of learning from experience you get the experience from going through those situations.Its a chance to show weve grown from that, and that were a better team for it.There were times when the Bruins lost their poise just a bit amidst the rowdy, frothy Bell Centre crowd. The Bs took penalties for throwing pucks into the stands and absorbed a too many men on the ice infraction when Mike Cammalleri threw a puck at the Boston bench during a line change. The game sped up on the Bruins, the refs got a little caught up in the atmosphere and Lucic paid a price when he finally got physically involved in the Habs series after watching his step during the first five games -- and having little effect on the proceedings as a result.The Bruins obviously took down Game 7 in overtime against the Habs to advance in the playoffs, but they know a Game 7 is to be avoided against Tampa Bay -- or any other team for that matter -- when the Kevin Garnett factor comes into play at that time in the series: anything is possible.So the Bs veterans and even the fresh-faced first-timers now have an idea what it takes to finally put down a hockey team in an elimination game, and the Black and Gold simply need to take the lessons theyve learned, apply them and go ahead and get it done ahead of time.
Its going to take ice bags, band-aids, stitches and a whole lot of blood to get the fourth win against the Lightning, and theyre willing to pay the price.You can learn from that situation. Maybe we were looking forward to the next series a little bit, said Marchand. We have to be more prepared for that sixth game. Theyre going to come out hard. The biggest thing is how teams battle when theyre fighting for their lives. What theyre willing to sacrifice and put their bodies through we have to make sure we do that exact same thing.If were not willing to put our bodies through the same kind of suffering then theyre going to end up on top. Thats what we have to make sure we do. The way everyone is focused and determined: we know what we have to do and we know how hard its going to be to beat Tampa Bay in their own rink. Were willing to do whatever we need to do tonight.The bottom line: the Bruins know they need to jump out to a quick start, weather the storm from the Lightning and stay within their disciplined lane once things get a little bumpy in a hostile Florida environment. Marchands line has been getting the call to set the tone in nearly every game of the playoffs, and the Bs winger knows its up to him -- along with Patrice Bergeron and Mark Recchi -- to start things off with a strong statement shift.We know theyre going to come out hard, but we have to make sure that were ready for the first shift, said Marchand. If we have a good shift with two or three opportunities and then the next three lines go we have to try to keep from letting them have any momentum in the first few shifts.I think maybe we can build a little emotion off that and give them a little counter-push. Its going to be a tough first five minutes and try to get through it. If we have a more aggressive start and were more determined, then its going to help us. The biggest factor in the first period is who comes out and scores that first. We have to make sure that its us.

Brad Marchand and the rest of his Bruins teammates know that the Vancouver Canucks are waiting for them in the Stanley Cup Finals set to start in the Pacific Northwest.But the Bs antagonist knows it could be a fatal mistake to start talking about the next series before finishing off the Lightning just as the Canucks finished off Jumbo Joe Thornton and the Sharks in double overtime.We dont know who Vancouver is going to be playing. If we start thinking its us then Tampa will come back and take control of the series, said Marchand. We have to make sure we dont worry about that. Were just worried about our game.This time out Eric Furlatt and Kelly Sutherland are the two refs for Game 6, and Guy Boucher pointed out Wednesday morning that theres a lopsided 24-9 margin of penalties against the Lightning in the last several Tampa games Furlatt worked this season. Should be interesting times for the diabolical coaching genius if things start going against the Lightning once the penalties come rolling in.Im aware of it. Very aware of it. Very, very aware of it. It has been a part of our discussions quite a few times in the last game the last few games we did have that particular ref. It is lopsided, said Boucher. The one thing we can control is what we do on the ice and hope that things will be fair like it is with everybody else.Dwayne Roloson is 6-0 in elimination games throughout his career, and isnt the puck-handling goaltender that Mike Smith is behind the net. That will change Bostons attack slightly in terms of dumps and chips into the offensive zone, and allows the Bruins to play a little more of their dump and smash fore-check game.Scrappy forward Sean Bergenheim is a question mark for the Lightning, and coach Guy Boucher said hell be a game time decision for Tampa Bay. Dana Tyrell and Randy Jones stand as potential replacements for Bergenheim if hes unable to answer the bell for Game 6 after lightning things up throughout the playoffs with a team-high nine goals. Hes a huge loss for Tampa if he cant play.
Joe Haggerty can be reached at jhaggerty@comcastsportsnet.com.Follow Joe on Twitter at http:twitter.comHackswithHaggs

Friday, July 29: Good signs in Bruins-Marchand negotiations

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Friday, July 29: Good signs in Bruins-Marchand negotiations

Here are the links from around the hockey world, and what I’m reading while using “malarkey” in my day-to-day vocabulary as much as possible. 
 
-- Dale Tallon was promoted with the Florida Panthers to accentuate his strengths as a talent evaluator, but maintains that he still has final say on hockey decisions
 
-- PHT writer Cam Tucker has another young D-man off the board with the Wild’s Matthew Dumba signing a two year, $5.1 million deal with Minnesota
 
-- In the interest of self-promotion, here’s my take on the negotiations between Brad Marchand and the Bruins: There’s a couple of good signs at the outset of negotiations
 
-- The Arizona Coyotes are stressing the defensive side of things in a big, big way, and it appears to be part of John Chayka’s master plan

 -- Alex Pietrangelo would be a natural selection to replace David Backes as the next captain of the St. Louis Blues. 

-- A moving letter from Sens forward Bobby Ryan to his recently passed mother is up at the Players Tribune website. 

-- Chris Kreider has re-signed with the New York Rangers, and plans to get out of his head and onto the score sheet more often. 
 
-- For something completely different: Jerod Mayo will bring a new voice to Tom E. Curran’s Quick Slants program on our very own CSN network. 

 

List of Bruins prospects includes two familiar names

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List of Bruins prospects includes two familiar names

With decidedly Boston-sounding names and thoroughly familiar faces, given their resemblances to their ex-Bruin dads, it might have been easy to overlook Ryan Donato and Ryan Fitzgerald and focus on the truly little-known prospects at Development Camp earlier this month.

But on the ice, their brimming confidence, their offensive skills and the maturity to their all-around game was impossible to ignore.

When it was over, general manager Don Sweeney singled out Donato, who plays at Harvard, and Fitzgerald, from Boston College -- along with Notre Dame forward Anders Bjork and former Boston University defenseman Matt Grzelcyk -- as players who have developed significantly.
 
“[They're] just comfortable in what they’re doing,” said Sweeney. “I mean, they’ve played at the college hockey level . . . two, three, four years with some of these kids. They’re very comfortable in their own skin and in what they do.”
 
Donato, 20, is actually coming off his first season at Harvard, where he posted 13 goals and 21 points in 32 games. He looked like he was in midseason form during Development Camp, showing off a scoring touch, skill with the puck on his stick in tight traffic, and the instincts to anticipate plays that allow him to beat defenders to spots in the offensive zone. He’s primed for a giant sophomore season with the Crimson, based on his showing at camp.
 
“Every year is a blast," said Donato, son of former Bruins forward and current Harvard coach Ted Donato. "You just come in [to development camp] with an open mindset where you soak everything up from the coaches like a sponge, and see what they say. Then I just do my best to incorporate it into my game and bring it with me to school next year.
 
“One of the things that [Bruins coaches and management] has said to me -- and it’s the same message for everybody -- is that every area of your game is an important one to develop. The thing about the NHL is that every little detail makes the difference, and that’s what I’ve been working on whether it’s my skating, or my defensive play. Every little piece of my game needs to be developed.”
 
Then there's Fitzgerald, 21, who is entering his senior season at BC after notching 24 goals and 47 points in 40 games last year in a real breakout season. The 2013 fourth-round pick showed speed and finishing ability during his Development Camp stint and clearly is close to being a finished hockey product at the collegiate level.
 
“It was good. It’s definitely a fun time being here, seeing these guys and putting the logo on,” said Fitzgerald, son of former Bruins forward Tom Fitzgerald, after his fourth Development Camp. “One thing I’m focusing on this summer is getting stronger, but it’s also about just progressing and maturing.
 
“I thought . . . last year [at BC] was a pretty good one, so I just try to build off that and roll into my senior season. [The Bruins] have told me to pretty much continue what I’m doing in school. When the time is right I’ll go ahead [and turn pro], so probably after I graduate I’ll jump on and make an impact.”
 
Fitzgerald certainly didn’t mention or give any hints that it could happen, but these days it has to give an NHL organization a bit of trepidation anytime one of their draft picks makes it all the way to their senior season. There’s always the possibility of it turning into a Jimmy Vesey-type situation if a player -- like Fitzgerald -- has a huge final year and draws enough NHL interest to forego signing with the team that drafted him for a shot at free agency in the August following his senior season.
 
It may be a moot point with Fitzgerald, a Boston kid already living a dream as a Bruins draft pick, but it’s always a possibility until he actually signs.
 
In any case, both Donato and Fitzgerald beat watching in their respective college seasons after both saw their development level take a healthy leap forward.