Haggerty: Bruins had free-agent foresight

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Haggerty: Bruins had free-agent foresight

By Joe Haggerty
CSNNE.com Bruins Insider Follow @hackswithhaggs
BOSTON The Bruins are sitting comfortably at roughly 10 million under the salary cap, and they could have even more space under the cap if Marc Savard (4 million) -- still fighting debilitating concussion symptoms -- decides to retire.

It's an amazing position for a defending Stanley Cup champion, and its a credit to just how strongly Peter Chiarelli, Don Sweeney and Jim Benning have built Boston's hockey club under the watchful eye of Cam Neely.

But it might not have been this way had it not been for the proactive approach employed by Chiarelli before the start of last season.

Chiarelli came under a bit of criticism for pulling the trigger on lucrative extensions for Patrice Bergeron and Zdeno Chara while the team was still over in Europe. But both deals look positively shrewd in the swollen landscape of todays free-agent market.

Bergeron will start his new three-year, 15 million deal in 2011-12. He would have commanded up to another million per season if hed been allowed to hit the market this summer.

Chara signed for seven years at a 6.9 million cap hit,which would have topped the average annual value of any other freeagent this summer. But who knows whatsome team desperate to make a splash might have offered the 6-foot-9blueliner, especially after Chara had led the Bruins' charge to the Cup?

Chiarelli isnt gloating over the wise strategy in retaining his key players, but he wont deny that the Bs are happy to have their stars locked up.

Were obviously pleased, Chiarelli said. I dont look back at it that way. Im happy we signed them at the time and I think they both got quite good money. They deserve it. Markets change and you make your decisions. Hopefully youre proactive with them. Thats why were here today with the roster we have.

Bergeron, 25, always wanted to remain in Boston, of course, and it's likely he and the B's would have reached agreement prior to his becoming a free agent. But seeing 27 million get shoveled at new Sabres forward Ville Leino, and Tim Connolly getting a shade under 5 million a year from the Toronto Maple Leafs after the 30-year-old shrank his way out of Buffalo, were both pretty eye-opening.

Bergeron scored 22 goals, finished fourth in the Selke Trophy voting, and was one of Bostons best players in the postseason. His value would have slotted in just below prime free agent Brad Richards, who recently signed a deal that will pay him an average of 6.6 million over the next nine years with the New York Rangers.

While Bergeron doesnt have the 90-point seasons or Conn Smythe Trophy on his resume, as Richards does, he's younger and still has room to grow offensively after focusing so much of his efforts on the nuances of the game in the face-off circle and in the defensive zone.

Similarly, Tomas Fleischmann came in at just under Bergerons 5 million per year for a four-year average of 4.5 million with the Florida Panthers. And Erik Cole was able to secure the exact same deal with the Montreal Canadiens after several decent seasons with the Carolina Hurricanes.

Bergeron is much better than Fleischmann, Cole and Leino at this point in their respective careers, but the Bs center is in their contractual neighborhood due to the foresight of Chiarellis plan before this season.

Chara's a bit tougher to gauge because hes a one-of-a-kind player with a unique size and skill set, but theres little doubt that the 33-year-old former Norris Trophy winner would have been the class of the free-agent market, with many suitors ready to woo him away from Boston. Charas leadership has evolved greatly from the moment he first arrived in Boston on a talent-deprived roster, and his offensive and defensive skill set remains in the elite category. He would have commanded much more than the 10-year, 40 million contract given to Christian Ehrhoff, or the five-year, 33 million wet kiss the Columbus Blue Jackets planted on James Wisniewski.

Chara and Bergeron both would have ended up back in Boston at the end of the day, but it would have cost the Bs an additional 1-2 million of salary cap space per season to secure their rights had they waited.

It may not seem like much, but that means another quality depth player or two that the Bruins can add to the mix the kind of funds that amounted to Benoit Pouliot or Joe Corvo this season.

Those are the kinds of decisions that allowed the Bruins to position themselves in Stanley Cup contention, and those are the kinds of fiscal choices that leave Boston on the cusp of a five-year run with talented core group of players.

Joe Haggerty can be reached at jhaggerty@comcastsportsnet.com. Follow Joe on Twitter at http:twitter.comHackswithHaggs

Saturday, May 28: Frustating season for Pred's Rinne

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Saturday, May 28: Frustating season for Pred's Rinne

Here are all the links from around the hockey world, and what I’m reading, while wondering how much of a dark cloud Slava Voynov’s presence is going to bring to the World Cup of Hockey.

*PHT’s Joey Alfieri tracks the ups and downs of Nashville Predators goalie Pekka Rinne, who had a frustrating season.

*Jonathan Drouin says that he “definitely wants to be” part of the Tampa Bay Lightning after a very rocky year with a happy ending for all.

*Speaking of the World Cup of Hockey, Taylor Hall was one of a number of deserving Canadian players – including P.K. Subban -- left off the roster.

*The San Jose Sharks have come a long way from their inaugural season in the league.

*Ottawa Senators senior advisor Bryan Murray is still getting used to a new role after a change in the Sens front office structure.

*Pittsburgh Penguins GM Jim Rutherford has plenty of reasons to be proud after a very good year running hockey ops for the Penguins.

*For something completely different: this January Rolling Stone magazine piece on Stevie Nicks was an excellent retrospective.

 

 

Marchand: Selection to Canada World Cup 'on a different level'

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Marchand: Selection to Canada World Cup 'on a different level'

Bruins left wing Brad Marchand definitely altered a lot of people’s perceptions about him as a hockey player when he scored 37 goals this season, and embraced more of a leadership role on a B’s team getting younger by the year. The B’s agitator started to reap the rewards of those changed opinions with a gold medal at the IIHF World Championships in Russia earlier this month, and on Friday with his inclusion on a ridiculously talented Team Canada roster set for the NHL and NHLPA-organized World Cup of Hockey in the fall.

Marchand will join linemate Patrice Bergeron and head coach Claude Julien as part of the Team Canada contingent, and could even be part of a reunited Marchand-Bergeron-Tyler Seguin line if Mike Babcock and Co. are looking for instant chemistry.

Either way Marchand was excited about suiting up for his country, and being part of a World Cup tournament that will include Bruins players Tuukka Rask, Zdeno Chara, David Pastrnak, David Krejci (who may not be available to play due to his hip surgery), Loui Eriksson and Dennis Seidenberg along with the Team Canada contingent.

“It’s an incredible honor to play for Team Canada. It’s something that I think we all take a lot of pride in, and something that is…it’s not an easy accomplishment,” said Marchand. “It’s not something you get to do very often, and to have that opportunity twice this year is very special and it’s not something I take for granted

“I think being part of a team like this is on a different level, and people may give a little more respect to that fact and may look at more of the kind of player I am, other than just the stuff they’ve seen in the past, with the hits and being a pest and stuff like that. Maybe those people will realize that I’m an OK hockey player, and I do play the game as well. But regardless, that’s not why I play the game. I play it to help our team win and just because I love the game, so however they feel, then that’s their opinion. But [earning more respect league-wide] is a possibility.”

This is the fifth time Marchand has been selected to compete for his home country of Canada in international play. The 5-foot-9, 181-pound forward tallied four goals and three assists in 10 games while helping Canada earn a gold medal at the aforementioned 2016 IIHF Men’s World Championships, held earlier this month in Russia. Marchand previously won gold with Team Canada at the U-20 World Championships in 2007 and 2008. He also earned a bronze medal with Team Canada Atlantic at the 2005 World U-17 Hockey Challenge.

The 2016 World Cup of Hockey will take place from Sept. 17 to Oct. 1, 2016 at Air Canada Centre in Toronto, home of the NHL’s Toronto Maple Leafs. The two-week tournament, featuring eight teams comprised of more than 150 of the best players in the NHL, will progress from the Preliminary Round to the Semifinals and ultimately the Final. 

The involvement of so many Bruins players along with Julien will make for a spare NHL camp in Boston come September with so many important pieces out for what is traditionally the first two weeks of camp.