B's win, 2-1, take back-to-back games vs. Habs

191545.jpg

B's win, 2-1, take back-to-back games vs. Habs

By Joe Haggerty
CSNNE.com Bruins Insider Follow @hackswithhaggs

MONTREAL Its no playoff series win, but the smiling Bruins leave Montreal with wins in back-to-back preseason games against the Habs.

A Max Sauve dish to Chris Clark for a guy midway through the third period snapped a 1-1 tie, and handed the Bruins a 2-1 victory over the Canadiens at a Bell Centre environment bent on playoff revenge.

After a scoreless first period, a familiar foe from the Habs did the damage against the Bruins. Former University of New Hampshire standout Phil DeSimone carried the puck toward the net from the right wing with Milan Lucic on his back, and fired a puck on Tuukka Rask that caused a rebound. Bs killer Mike Cammalleri jumped to the front of the net and popped in the loose puck to account for the games first goal.

The Bruins fought back with their own dirty goal in the third. Matt Bartkowski snapped a shot on net with Jordan Caron and David Krejci providing plenty of traffic in front, and Carey Price kicked a rebound directly out to Tyler Seguin. The Bs rookie made it two goals in two games when he flipped the loose puck into the net, and tied things up for the Black and Gold.

Tuukka Rask was impregnable between the pipes and made 31 saves en route to the victory in Montreals raucous barn.

GOLD STAR: Jordan Caron. The Bruins winger won himself a job on the Bs final roster with a strong performance at the Bell Centre last year, and Caron was again dominant in his home Province of Quebec. Caron managed an assist, had four shots on net and four registered hits while fore-checking, back-checking, creating traffic in front of the net and doing all of the other things that earn points with head coach Claude Julien. Caron, Chris Clark, and Benoit Pouliot are potentially in a tight competition for two spots on the Boston roster, and both Caron and Clark have been consistently excellent in camp.

HONORABLE MENTION: Tuukka Rask made 31 saves including a number of quick reflex stops, and is enjoying a very good training camp as the hungry backup to Tim Thomas. Rask was at his best while shutting the door on Brock Trottier in a rapid rebound attempt after the Finnish goalie had initially lost track of the pucks location. The Habs managed to create some very good chances, but Rask never wavered in an encouraging performance for an upcoming season where hell be needed quite a bit.

BLACK EYE: Give David Krejci credit for helping create some body traffic in front of the net on Tyler Seguins goal, but the Bruins center was in prime sleepwalking mode for most of the night skating with Seguin and Milan Lucic. Krejci lost 3 of 14 face-offs, was a minus-1 and didnt register a shot on net, but its also the preseason and the creative center cant be blamed for saving the good stuff for then.
TURNING POINT: The Bruins finally got some traction in the third period when the SeguinCaronKrejci line broke through for a goal after serving as Bostons forward trio for the night. Breaking the seal on Carey Price allowed the Bs to score once again later on in the period when the game was deadlocked at 1-1, and protect a slim lead against the Habs.

BY THE NUMBERS: 1 the number of individual assists in the game for Matt Bartkowski, Steve Kampfer and Max Sauve as all three younger players stepped up their games with roster spots on the line.

QUOTE TO NOTE: He was playing well. You want to see all kinds of different things in exhibition games. Youre just trying to see how guys adapt to different situations. I thought he deserved it and you want to see how guys adapt. I thought he did a great job. Claude Julien on elevating Jordan Caron to a line with Krejci and Seguin in the third period after putting in a solids night work.

Joe Haggerty can be reached at jhaggerty@comcastsportsnet.com. Follow Joe on Twitter at http:twitter.comHackswithHaggs.

Wednesday, Jan. 18: Landeskog wants to stay in Colorado

Wednesday, Jan. 18: Landeskog wants to stay in Colorado

Here are all the links from around the hockey world, and what I’m reading while thoroughly enjoying Nick Offerman co-hosting on the Today Show this morning.

*Gabriel Landeskog knows his name has been mentioned in trade rumors with teams like the Bruins, but he wants to stay with the Colorado Avalanche.

*The New York Rangers are facing a goalie crisis for the first time in 11 years as Henrik Lundqvist is beginning to show signs of hockey mortality.

*PHT writer James O’Brien has the New York Islanders seeking to speak with fired Florida coach Gerard Gallant about their new opening after firing Jack Capuano.

*Ondrej Pavelec has been brought back from the AHL to Winnipeg to rescue the Jets from their goaltending situation, and he wants to stay for as long as he can.

*Rene Bourque has reached the 700 game mark in his NHL career with the Colorado Avalanche, and he hopes to keep it going.

*Young star Jack Eichel’s hunger for greatness could certainly lend itself to a leadership role with the Buffalo Sabres

*For something completely different: Hollywood is thinking of rebooting “White Men Can’t Jump” and this is simply the worst idea ever. I’d rather watch a movie with Woody and Snipes 25 years later than a lame reboot.

 


 

Haggerty: Bruins would be foolish to trade Brandon Carlo

Haggerty: Bruins would be foolish to trade Brandon Carlo

There’s been smoke for weeks signaling trade talks between the Boston Bruins and the Colorado Avalanche, and things are reportedly heating up with the Bruins potentially reaching a tipping point with their subpar play on the ice. According to Bleacher Report columnist Adrian Dater, things may be progressing between the two teams because the Bruins are beginning to entertain the idea of trading away 20-year-old top pairing rookie defenseman Brandon Carlo.

Bruins Director of Player Personnel John Ferguson Jr. was expected to be out in Colorado scouting the Avalanche/Blackhawks game on Tuesday night, and perhaps getting a long look at players like Gabriel Landeskog, Matt Duchene and Tyson Barrie among others.

The expectation is that 24-year-old Landeskog is in the middle of these trade discussions, and that he would be one of the players targeted by a Bruins team that could use more size on the wing, and more players that can put the puck in the net. Certainly Landeskog has done that in his brief NHL career after being a No. 2 overall pick, and has four 20-goal seasons on his resume prior to a disappointing, injury-plagued current season in Colorado.

The word around the league was that talks fizzled between the Bruins and Avs previously when Joe Sakic asked about the availability of the Colorado Springs native Carlo, and those discussions hit the same crunching roadblock that Winnipeg did in discussions with Boston about Jacob Trouba.

Perhaps that has changed in the last 24 hours after Cam Neely and Don Sweeney watched their Bruins completely no-show against the worst team in the Eastern Conference, the New York Islanders, on Monday afternoon. Now one would expect that Bruins management is getting desperate feeling that a third “Did Not Qualify” for the Stanley Cup playoffs could be in their future if they don’t make a bold, swift move to shake up their dazed hockey club.

But let’s not pull any punches here. The entire Bruins management group should be fired on the spot if they trade a 20-year-old, top pairing shutdown defenseman on an entry level contract like Carlo unless they are getting a bona fide superstar in return. Carlo, Charlie McAvoy and David Pastrnak should all be young, untouchable assets for a Bruins organization that is years away from legitimately holding a chance at a Stanley Cup.

Landeskog is not a bona fide superstar. He’s a good player that’s topped out at 26 goals and 65 points in the NHL, but he’s also the Captain on a horrendous, underachieving Avalanche team over the last three years.

If the price were right for Landeskog it would make all the sense in the world for the Bruins to deal him, but it’s a giant honking red flag that Colorado is looking to unload a player like him that’s signed for a reasonable $5.5 million price tag over the next four seasons. Teams don’t trade young players like that with term unless there’s more to the story, and that’s something the Bruins would do well to consider before giving up a player that could be a top-4 shutdown defenseman in Boston for the next 10 years.

Teams like the Bruins that are in reloading mode also shouldn’t be trading 20-year-old players for 24-year-old players that have already cashed in on their second contract. That’s exactly how the Bruins can get right back into salary cap trouble, and do it with a team that’s producing far less than the Peter Chiarelli groups that were at least still making the playoffs.  

Certainly the Bruins have other young D-men like Charlie McAvoy, Jakub Zboril and Jeremy Lauzon coming down the pipeline, but none of those defensemen are in the mold of a true shutdown D like the 6-foot-5 Carlo. With Zdeno Chara in the final few years of his career with the Black and Gold, the B’s are going to need Carlo to slide into that defensive stopper role given his size, strength, wing span and willingness to do the dirty work the D-zone.

That goes beyond the simple fact that rebuilding the back end with ALL of those young stud D-men is the best way to actually build the Bruins back up into a legitimate Eastern Conference power. 

It would be a giant mistake for the Bruins to ship away a player like Carlo with the hope Landeskog can put Boston over the hump for the playoffs this season, and perhaps ease some of the intense pressure currently weighing on Sweeney and Neely. That kind of desperate move smacks of doing it for all of the wrong reasons, and that’s one way to ensure that the Bruins will never escape the web of mediocrity that they’re currently caught in.