Bruins feel varying impacts of consussions

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Bruins feel varying impacts of consussions

Taylor Twellman, whose own career ended because of multiple concussions, says Marc Savard "could wake up tomorrow and feel 100 percent." And, in fact, the Bruins have a player on their roster -- Patrice Bergeron -- who has been able to get past concussion issues . . .

By MaryPaoletti
CSNNE.com

Cam Neely has two players on the roster who sit at opposite ends of the post-concussion spectrum: Marc Savard and Patrice Bergeron.

Bergeron was thrown headfirst into the boards and suffered a Grade 3 concussion in October of 2007-08. He wasnt cleared for full participation until the following preseason. But after showing positive signs for improvement, he collided with a member of the Carolina Hurricanes on December 20, 2007.

Another concussion. There was no timetable for return.

MORE ON THIS STORY
THE PROBLEM: Isthere a concussion 'epidemic' in hockey? Notnecessarily
THE REACTION: Manyplayers choose not to worry about concussions
THE FACE OF THE PROBLEM:TaylorTwellman: One man's concussion story
Bergeron returned to play after little more than a month. His career since has been on an upswing.

How does a guy go from being physically unable to participate in hockey to leading the Bruins in points (20 goals, 29 assists through Feb. 24) in his third year back?

With time, with life, the brain will remodel itself, Harvard University athletic trainer Chad Krawiec states. Will it get to the point where you can play sports? Some people, no. But for living and functioning, your brain typically will. 100 of the time, no one can really say that. But for the majority of our athletes we deal with, as far as we know with the information we have now in 2011, the brain will react, recover, and get to a normal functioning level and be safe to play sports again.

Acknowledgment of symptoms, proper diagnosis, time to heal.

Its about the players themselves trying to be as honest as they can with the trainers, the doctors, Neely says. Its not like any other injury; the brain is a different animal. The players have to take the responsibility.

But the Bruins president a Hall of Fame NHLer understands that players want to play.

Athletes often draw their identities from their sport. Life beyond the game exists, but 10-15 years in the future may as well be 10-15,000; retirement is a reality to face only when theres nowhere else to look. Fear of disappointing coaches and teammates or losing their roster spots? The immediacy makes it real. Thats when the fear is worn like blinders.

Thats why the primary goal for an athlete after a concussion isnt always getting healthy; its getting back onto the ice.

A primary component of concussion recognition the identification of patient symptoms is in fact subjective, Krawiec admits.If the patient decides he does not want to report fully and honestly then he can, and we would have to go on that. Thats his own conscious risk hes taking, but he can obviously lie or just not report the severity.

The cognitive tests like the neuropsychological tests we administer are a little more difficult to cheat on. Some guys will intentionally do poorly on the healthy baseline test instituted in the NHL in 1997, thinking that when concussed a poor test will then look good sort of set the bar low to start. The problem is, even these mild concussive states place the brain in a susceptible position. The players may not think its a problem, but it can be dangerous.

Its difficult for spectators to understand why someone would knowingly put his brain in danger. For some athletes, surrendering to an invisible assailant, being patient as they watch their world pass by, is even harder.

Mary Paoletti can be reached at mpaoletti@comcastsportsnet.com.Follow Mary on Twitter at http:twitter.comMary_Paoletti

Sweeney on lack of B's deals: "I wasn't trading David Pastrnak"

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Sweeney on lack of B's deals: "I wasn't trading David Pastrnak"

BUFFALO – A year ago Don Sweeney traded away one of his talented young players for pennies on the dollar when he shipped Dougie Hamilton to Calgary for three draft picks, and it would appear he’s learned from that experience. While the Bruins general manager admitted he was desperately in search of some defensemen help this weekend, Sweeney said the prices were too high to get a deal done on Friday night at the First Niagara Center.

A source indicated to CSNNE.com earlier on Friday that All-Star defenseman Kevin Shattenkirk would end up with “the Bruins, Flyers or Rangers” this season, but it sure sounded like the St. Louis Blues were pricing themselves out of making any deals. According to Sweeney, other team’s managers were asking him to include both of his 2016 first round picks and more to swing a deal for a defenseman, and that young right wing David Pastrnak’s name kept coming up in these discussions.

That was far too steep an asking price in the rightful minds of Sweeney and Bruins management, so there were no defensemen that ended up getting moved on Friday night. Unfortunately, other NHL teams will keep asking about the emerging Pastrnak knowing full well that the Bruins are in a desperate position to repair their personnel on the back end. 

“In all honesty it would have taken both first rounders and then some…the acquisition cost was high. We want to continue to improve our hockey club with whatever we have to do, but it’s not unlike last year when it would have taken all three first rounders [to get a deal done]. There’s a balancing act there,” said Sweeney. “There was not a lot that moved around today. People have been laying foundation [for trades] for quite some time, but there are players that we’re just not comfortable putting into deals. I’m going to defend that. I’ll be honest with you that I just am.

“We’ve taken a position where we’re going to build this the right way. We want to be competitive and improve our team, and we’ll be active in the free agent market to fill holes while allowing our young players to push through. But I wasn’t trading David Pastrnak. We’ve been criticized, and rightfully so at times, for being impatient with our younger, skilled players. This represents a good opportunity that we don’t want to do that.”

Instead the Bruins selected Charlie McAvoy and Trent Frederic with the 14th and 29th overall picks in the first round, and they’ll start at the drawing board on Saturday while hoping to build toward a deal for a top-4 “transitional defenseman.” They’ll also do it knowing they made the right call in protecting the 14th pick where they selected a future transitional defenseman that will perhaps be a younger, cheaper version of Shattenkirk three years down the road. 

Joe Haggerty can be followed on Twitter: @HacksWithHaggs

Bruins select center Trent Frederic with 29th pick in 2016 NHL Draft

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Bruins select center Trent Frederic with 29th pick in 2016 NHL Draft

BUFFALO – The Bruins went off the board to make their second choice in the first round, and selected big, gritty center Trent Frederic from the U.S. National Team Development Program.  Frederic was ranked 47th among North American skaters by the NHL Central Scouting Bureau, and is ultimately viewed as a solid bottom-six two-way center with limited offensive ability.

A nice Bruins-style player to be sure, but also the kind of player that can easily be picked in the second, or third, round rather than with the 29thpick in the first round. It’s pretty clear the B’s were hoping to package up the 29th pick along with a prospect to acquire a top-4 defenseman, and that they didn’t have many designs on actually choosing a player.

That led to a surprised Frederic, who was happy to be a first round pick if not a little blown away by his good NHL fortune.

“I guess I was a little surprised. If you could hear my whole family's reaction then you get the gist of it,” said Frederic, who listed David Backes and Justin Abdelkader as the NHL players he most models his game after in his career. “They were pumped, and I am pumped. As a player I’m a two-way physical player that’s good with the puck.

“I’ve had some tournaments in Boston, and some family vacations there. I visited Boston University when I thought about going there, and I’ve been to Fenway Park and TD Garden. It’s one of my favorite cities.”

The Frederic pick might have been off the beaten path a bit, but it was a pretty special selection for a number of other reasons: Frederic was the record-setting 12th US-born player taken in the first round, and the fifth player taken in the 2016 first round from the St. Louis area. The Bruins have to hope that he develops into a more dangerous, effective player during his college hockey days at Wisconsin, and that he feels a little less like the Bruins reaching for players in the first round for the second draft in a row. 

Photo via Joe Haggerty

Charlie McAvoy tweeted he hates the Bruins 'so much' in 2013

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Charlie McAvoy tweeted he hates the Bruins 'so much' in 2013

Tweet hunters dug up an old message from a Charlie McAvoy proclaiming his hatred for the Boston Bruins. McAvoy, of course, was drafted 14th by the Bruins in the 2016 NHL Draft.

The tweet read, "I hate the bruins so much" before it was quickly deleted.

I'm sure this will go over well for Bruins fans, even though you really can't blame McAvoy. He was just 15 at the time and a fan of the Rangers, who went down 3-0 in the playoffs against the Bruins.

As fans, we can all relate to that feeling.