Bruins crush Canucks 8-1, lose Horton in Game 3

191545.jpg

Bruins crush Canucks 8-1, lose Horton in Game 3

By DannyPicard
CSNNE.com

BOSTON -- @font-face font-family: "Times New Roman";p.MsoNormal, li.MsoNormal, div.MsoNormal margin: 0in 0in 0.0001pt; font-size: 12pt; font-family: "Times New Roman"; a:link, span.MsoHyperlink color: blue; text-decoration: underline; a:visited, span.MsoHyperlinkFollowed color: purple; text-decoration: underline; table.MsoNormalTable font-size: 10pt; font-family: "Times New Roman"; div.Section1 page: Section1; The Bruins got back into the Stanley Cup Finals Monday night, scoring four second-period goals and four third-period goals to defeat the Vancouver Canucks 8-1 in Game 3 at TDGarden.

Boston now trails the series, 2-1.

Tim Thomas, heavilycriticized for the way he played Vancouvers game-winning goal in Game 2, made 40 saves in backstopping the victory.

What will be heavily criticized on Tuesday will be AaronRomes first-period hit on Nathan Horton.

Horton was taken off the ice on a stretcher and was sent toMassachusetts General Hospital after the Canucks defenseman came off his feetand crushed Horton with a devastating hit at the Vancouver blue line just overfive minutes into the game.

Horton had received a pass at center ice and quickly dishedit off to his left. Moments later, Rome stepped up at the blue line and hitHorton while Horton was looking the other way.

The Bruins said after the first period that Horton hadmovement in all of his extremities.

Rome was ejected from the game.

Vancouver outshot Boston 12-7 in the first period butthe Bruins made their statement in the second, scoring four goals andtaking a 4-0 lead into the third period.

Andrew Ference got the scoring started 11 seconds yes, 11seconds into the second. It took the same amount of time in overtime of Game2 for Alex Burrows to score the game-winner.

Ference was responsible for the initial neutral-zoneturnover that led to that game-winner. He got his revenge by wristing aknuckle-puck from the left point and into the top-right corner for a 1-0Bruins lead.

Mark Recchi made it 2-0 with 20 seconds left on a powerplay, 4:22 into the second period. Recchi was set up in the corner, and threw apass out front that was intended for Rich Peverley. But before it even got tohim, Ryan Kesler reached out with his stick, and re-directed the puck throughRoberto Luongos legs and into the net.

Brad Marchand gave the Bs a 3-0 lead while Vancouver was ona power play, with 8:30 left in the period. The short-handed goal was a one-maneffort that started with a stick lift from Marchand in the neutral zone.

Marchand took the puck hard down the right wing, and beatKesler wide at the circle. He came across the slot all alone, stayed patient,and shot the puck top-shelf after Luongo went down.

David Krejci added the fourth goal by putting home a reboundoff a low Michael Ryder shot from the high slot, with 4:13 left in the period.

In a chippy third period that saw Shawn Thornton, MilanLucic, and Dennis Seidenberg ejected, Daniel Paille gave the Bruins a 5-0 leadwhile scoring Bostons second short-handed goal of the night, skating down theleft wing and putting a shot on Luongo that hit the goaltenders glove andtrickled in.

Jannik Hansen gave Vancouver its only goal of the night,with 6:07 left in the game, putting home a one-timer from the left post.

Recchi, Chris Kelly, and Michael Ryder scored three moreagainst a clearly deflated Canucks team in the final 2:21 to make the final 8-1.

Danny Picard is on twitter at http:twitter.comDannyPicard

McIntyre still building and earning trust of B's coaching staff

bruins-zane-mcintyre.jpg

McIntyre still building and earning trust of B's coaching staff

BRIGHTON, Mass -- It hasn’t been an easy road for Bruins rookie goaltender Zane McIntyre since getting called back up by Boston a few weeks ago.

The 24-year-old netminder is trying to give the B’s top-level goaltending while earning the trust of the Bruins coaching staff, and adjusting to the sporadic playing time that goes along with playing understudy to a No. 1 netminder like Tuukka Rask. The three goals allowed in the third period of Sunday afternoon’s 5-1 loss to the Penguins didn’t look good on paper, but really there wasn’t much McIntyre could do with the defense totally breaking down in front of him during a 12-shot barrage in the final 20 minutes.

The 3.95 goals against average and .860 save percentage certainly look like a little frightening for the first-year goalie, but the truth is there’s going to be some bumps as he adjusts to life as a backup for the first time.

“[The adjustment] is mostly between the ears, to be honest,” said McIntyre. “I have confidence in my physical abilities and I know what I can do, and what makes my game successful. So right now it’s just building confidence every day in practice and staying persistent, staying with it. I know good things are going to happen when you surround yourself with good people, and the biggest thing is battling every day and making sure I’m contributing to the team.”

McIntyre will certainly have to be sharp if he’s put back in the crease on Tuesday night against the Red Wings after Rask exited from Sunday’s loss in the second period with symptoms of a migraine. The Bruins top goalie missed practice on Monday while getting himself checked out medically, and there’s a chance he could be out if the symptoms are in any way related to the Roman Josi shot he took off his neck last week.

“I’m just taking it day-by-day to be honest. That’s what I’ve always done in the past, and I’m just trying to build up confidence every day,” said McIntyre, who had been lights out in Providence prior to getting the call to Boston. “We’ll just see what happens and roll with it.”

That’s a challenge McIntyre will certainly be up for in a different way than Sunday’s mop-up duty, but it remains to be seen just how steady-footed the Bruins will be about their goalie situation if Rask is expected to miss any time this week.