Bruins-Canucks: Five thoughts from the first

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Bruins-Canucks: Five thoughts from the first

By JoeHaggerty
CSNNE.com
VANCOUVER Here are five thoughts from the first period with the Bruins trailing the Vancouver Canucks by a 1-0 score after the first 20 minutes at Rogers Arena.1) Boston Bruins have one goal in their last seven periods of play. Tough time to be going through some offensive struggles, but thats what is happening now against a Vancouver team that can quickly recover puck and transition into offense. The speed difference between the Bruins and Canucks is pretty stunning to watch when Vancouver is also playing with the kind of physicality weve seen in the first two games. There are too many Bruins skaters that just cant hang in there speed-wise against Vancouver, and its the reason they constantly appear to be chasing the puck. The shots were 11-11 at the end of the first period, but Vancouver carried that period of hockey in a big way.2) Bad penalty by Zdeno Chara on Ryan Kesler that led to the Vancouver goal, even if Kesler dove a little bit for effect. The Bruins had numbers on defense and Chara could have managed a lot less body contact trying to slow the Vancouver attacker down. In a series where discipline is a huge key, that wasnt disciplined at all and as is almost always the case a sloppy penalty like that leads to a Canucks goal.3) No suspension for Alex Burrows for biting Patrice Bergerons finger came back to hurt the Bruins as he scored the game's only goal to this point. Like Burrows, Nathan Horton, who was not suspended for Game 7 against the Lightning after spraying a fan with water from a water bottle at the end of Game 6, scored a goal in a game in which he could have been suspended. There is some kind of commentary on the NHL in there somewhere.4) A soft goal by Tim Thomas to the short side that slid between his blocker arm and the side of his body once Burrows flicked the puck at him from the left face-off dot. Thomas needs to be pretty close to perfect for the Bruins to beat the Canucks, and the goal allowed was nowhere close to perfect. A pretty good period of hockey otherwise, but one soft goal is too many against Vancouver.5) Four hits for Andrew Alberts in the first period in place of injuredDan Hamhuis. Obviously Alberts brings a different element to the Canucks lineup, and he looked strong standing in for Hamhuis.
Joe Haggerty can be reached at jhaggerty@comcastsportsnet.com.Follow Joe on Twitter at http:twitter.comHackswithHaggs

Bruins assign Noel Acciari to Providence

Bruins assign Noel Acciari to Providence

After sitting out the last month with a lower body injury, Bruins fourth liner Noel Acciari has been assigned to Providence presumably to get up to speed after missing a considerable length of time. It also means that Acciari has likely been cleared medically to play after appearing in B's practice over the last few days after missing the last 14 games. 

The 24-year-old former Providence College standout has appeared in 12 games with the Bruins this season after breaking camp with the team, and recorded two assists for two points with four penalty minutes and a plus-one rating before suffering a lower body injury.

By all accounts Acciari was a good energy player on a surprisingly good fourth line to start the season, wasn’t afraid to throw around his body for impactful hits and was having plenty of success aggravating opponents into losing their cool and taking penalties. Fellow rookie forward Anton Blidh has stepped in and played a similar role on the fourth line over the last couple of games for the Black and Gold, so that gives the Bruins plenty of time to get Acciari back up to speed at the AHL level without their fourth line’s level of play dropping in the meantime.

The Acciari demotion to Providence does mean that the Bruins head into Washington with 12 forwards, so it should again be Blidh, Dominic Moore and Jimmy Hayes as the fourth line barring any last minute wrinkles from Claude Julien.