Bergenheim key to Tampa's battle

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Bergenheim key to Tampa's battle

By Mary Paoletti
CSNNE.com

BOSTON -- Tampa Bay's offensive arsenal is packed with high-caliber NHL names: Stamkos, St. Louis, LeCavalier, Bergenheim.

Bergenheim?

Yes. What the winger lacks in household starpower he is making up for with playoff firepower. Sean Bergenheim scored his eighth goal of the postseason in the first period of Tampa's 5-2 win over Boston. The total is more than half his regular-season output (14 G, 80 GM) and currently leads the league.

He's modest.

"Well, you know, it's a good feeling, but to be honest the best feeling is that we're winning," Bergenheim said. "I'm obviously happy that I've been helping the team, but I think it's more of a line effort and our line that's been clicking."

Despite being plucked from the locker room to give the ever-exclusive podium interview, Bergenheim deflected praise toward his teammates. His 'For the Greater Good' attitude is not unusual. It's a good manners practice often exercised by athletes across all sports.

Or it's the honest-to-goodness truth.

Sean Bergenheim isn't threatening to eclipse the talent and skill of Steven Stamkos -- not even close -- but his amped-up efforts do make you consider the Lightning a little differently. Tampa is looking for contributions all over the ice. And finding them.

Martin St. Louis spoke about the role players.

"In the playoffs, you've got to raise your role even more," said St. Louis. "I think Bergenheim's taken a step in his game and that whole line's playing tremendous for us. They're playing some dominant minutes. They're tough to play against and that's what we want."

The 35-year old delivers his quotes tersely.

He's not quite surprised and delighted by the increased production of the bench. To St. Louis, these players are simply matching supply to demand. The playoffs are a time of war -- "good" isn't good enough -- and you can't hand out medals whenever a soldier goes beyond the call of duty. Survival is trickier, the stakes are higher and so is the bar.

Bergenheim has another great night? Slap him on the back and move on.

St. Louis has earned the right to his matter-of-factness. He is a Stanley Cup winner, he is the Lightning's all-time scoring leader, a power play specialist and the jackhammering heart of the team.

And he's exactly right about Bergenheim and the rest.

"Those guys are bringing it, everybody's bringing it," said St. Louis. "We need everybody this time of year. We don't have any passengers and that's why we have had success."

It's so simple: Which side do you want to be on? The side with five goals or the side with two? Do you want to win or do you want to lose? An obvious answer. That's when you look down the second third, and fourth lines and say, Don't tell me; show me.

"Those guys," said winger Teddy Purcell, "at the end of the day are going to make the difference."

On a night when zero goals are scored by St. Louis, Vincent Lecavalier (Tampa's No. 3 in franchise scoring history) or Stamkos (his 45 regular season goals were 2nd in the NHL), they have to. They've got to beat David Krejci on face-offs, draw penalties, translate Tomas Kaberle turnovers into points, block shots like Eric Brewer and stay on the net like Bergenheim.

"So far in the playoffs he's been a key," Purcell said. "He's one of the reasons why we're having success."

The Bergenheim sparks of success. Let these bench fires keep blazing? Tampa might burn a fire too big for Boston to put out.

Mary Paoletti can be reached at mpaoletti@comcastsportsnet.com. Follow Mary on Twitter at http:twitter.comMary_Paoletti

Marchand: 'No place I'd rather play' than Boston

Marchand: 'No place I'd rather play' than Boston

The Bruins made it official on Monday -- mere minutes after the news had broken -- as they clearly couldn’t wait to announce an eight year, $49 million contract extension for Brad Marchand. who is finishing up his Team Canada gig at the World Cup of Hockey.

PROFILE: Joe Haggerty's preseason look at Brad Marchand

The deal averages $6.125 million per season, broken up between actual salary and signing bonus money. The Bruins were most definitely given a hometown discount by an elite player who snapped home a career-high 37 goals and 60 points last season, the most goals scored by a Bruins player since Glenn Murray in 2002-03. And everybody knows goal scorers get paid in the NHL, even if Marchand won’t be expected to score quite that many every year.

Marchand, 28, has also been the second-leading scorer in the entire World Cup of Hockey tournament, behind only Sidney Crosby, and continues to raise his profile in the NHL world beyond his customary agitator role. The “Nose Face Killah” could have waited for until free agency if he'd wanted to pick up every last nickel on the table, but it’s very clear he’s invested in the team that drafted and developed him, and with which he won a Cup five years ago.

"This is an extremely exciting day for me and my family," said Marchand, who now has a full no-move clause for the first five years of his next contract. "I would like to thank the Jacobs family, [president] Cam Neely, [general manager] Don Sweeney, [coach] Claude Julien, the coaching staff, my teammates and our fans for their continued support and belief in me. I have been a Bruin since the start of my pro career and there is no place I would rather play. I look forward to doing everything I can to help our team achieve success and bring the Stanley Cup back to Boston."

Marchand has been among the team’s leading scorers since joining the league in 2010-11, has been the NHL’s most dangerous penalty killer over the last five years, and pairs with Patrice Bergeron to anchor the top line. He’s also become much more of a leader in the last few seasons as other character veterans have been peeled away from the core group, and a hometown discount proves it one of the most meaningful ways possible.

It was clear Marchand was invested in the Bruins when he helped recruit free agent David Backes with phone calls this summer, and he was also present for the recruiting pitch to Jimmy Vesey at Warrior Ice Arena last month.

The Bruins players at training camp were happy to hear No. 63 was going to be in Boston for the long haul.

“Marchy is Marchy. I think everybody kind of knows what that means,” said Kevan Miller. “He’s been great for our organization and great for the fans and for this city. He’s been all in since Day One, and he’s been a guy that I looked up to.”

While the Bruins have confirmed the contract, Sweeney won't weigh in until later today. But one would expect there will be an appreciation for the skill of the player, and Marchand’s commitment to the organization after accepting less than he could have gotten on the open market.

Monday, Sept. 26: So what happens if Canada loses World Cup final?

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Monday, Sept. 26: So what happens if Canada loses World Cup final?

Here are all the links from around the hockey world, and what I’m reading while finding it hard to believe that it’s game day for the Boston Bruins. Summer is officially O-V-A.
 
-- The Montreal media is starting to get on board with this tougher, grittier version of the Habs, along with a healthy Carey Price.
 
-- Pierre McGuire sits in with Ottawa’s TSN sports radio station and talks Team Europe in the World Cup, as well as a number of other things.

-- FOH (Friend of Haggs) Mike Zeisberger is already openly wondering what would happen in Canada if they lose to Team Europe in the best-of-three final to the World Cup.

-- FOH (Friend of Haggs) Puck Daddy Greg Wyshynski asks Brad Marchand if a part of him has thought about playing with Sidney Crosby on the Penguins if he hits free agency. Bells, alarms and whistles should be going off on Causeway Street to give No. 63 whatever he wants at this point. In case you missed it, I talked about the danger of Crosby trying to woo his Nova Scotian buddy to Pittsburgh last week.
 
-- PHT writer James O’Brien says it sounds like the St. Louis Blues are going to play a more aggressive brand of hockey this season.
 
-- For something completely different: Forbes Magazine says Pete Carroll, not Bill Belichick, should be considered the NFL’s foremost cheater.