Bruins working on fine-tuning the second period

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Bruins working on fine-tuning the second period

The second period is beginning to look like this seasons bugaboo for a Bruins team without a lot of question marks.

The Bruins were outshot by a 13-6 margin and fell behind the Senators in Tuesday nights second period at TD Garden, but once again their lackluster second period was trumped by a superior effort in the final 20 minutes of the game in a 4-3 victory over Ottawa.

Over the course of the season the second period is the only time the Bruins have been outshot by their opponents by a 518-495 margin though theyve still outscored opponents in the second period by a 51-34 margin. Either way Claude Julien feels that the Bruins have fixed some of their lackluster starts to games that plagued them earlier in the season, and they are the most dominant NHL team in the final 20 minutes over the last two seasons.
But, Boston, theres a problem with the second period. When things arent going well, that seems to be the time when their play wanders away from the systemic game plan the coaches have put in place.

Every year, there seems to be a challenge in certain periods. I thought we were doing a pretty good job earlier on in the second period, but lately thats our game. When our game falters a little bit, we kind of come out with an okay first but then struggle through the second, said Julien. Desperation sets in for the third period, and thats what were trying to do here. Last year was always a 60-minute effort going into the playoffs because the regular season was a challenge in regards to that, and right now it is a bit of a challenge to put a full 60 together.

So put the middle 20 minutes among the check list of things that the Bruins have to work on while eking out games since Christmas, and battling to find the consistency that seemed automatic during the months of November and December. It might start with channeling the same kind of desperation the Bs have in the final 20 minutes with the game on the line. More often than not the Bruins are winning games when theyre not necessarily at their best, and thats the mark of a pretty good hockey team.

Its been necessity, recently. You know, were a good team. We know that. We might not always do it for the whole three periods, which is what we want to do, said Tim Thomas. We did it for a good portion there in November and December. If we havent had a real good period in a game yet then well probably have it in the third, right when we need it.

The second and third periods are probably the perfect example of where both the Bs and Senators franchises are at the moment. Boston is the champion with the confidence theyre going to pull it out in the end while Ottawa still has some questions to answer as a young, contending team that couldnt quite hang with the Bs once the dial got turned up in the third.

Magic Johnson named Lakers president of basketball ops, Kupchak fired

Magic Johnson named Lakers president of basketball ops, Kupchak fired

Magic Johnson was named the Los Angeles Lakers' president of basketball operations after longtime Lakers GM Mitch Kupchak and vice president of basketball ops Jim Buss were fired, the team announced.

"Today I took a series of actions I believe will return the Lakers to the heights [late owner] Dr. Jerry Buss demanded and our fans rightly expect,” Jeanie Buss, Jerry Buss' daughter, Jim Buss' brother and Lakers president and co-owner, said in a statement. “Effective immediately, Earvin Johnson will be in charge of all basketball operations and will report directly to me. Our search for a new General Manager to work with Earvin and Coach Luke Walton is well underway and we hope to announce a new General Manager in short order. Together, Earvin, Luke and our new General Manager will establish the foundation for the next generation of Los Angeles Lakers greatness.”

Johnson, the Hall of Famer guard who led L.A. to five NBA titles, said in the same statement: “It’s a dream come true to return to the Lakers as President of Basketball Operations working closely with Jeanie Buss and the Buss family. Since 1979, I’ve been a part of the Laker Nation and I’m passionate about this organization. I will do everything I can to build a winning culture on and off the court. We have a great coach in Luke Walton and good young players. We will work tirelessly to return our Los Angeles Lakers to NBA champions.”

Johnson, part of a group that owns MLB's Los Angeles Dodgers, returned to the organization as an adviser earlier this month. Johnson coached the Lakers briefly in the 1993-94 season, going 5-11. 

The current Lakers have the third-worst record in the NBA at 19-39 after finishing with the second-worst mark in the league (17-65) last season. Kupchak was named an assistant GM under Jerry West in 1986 and in 2000 took over for West as GM. 


 

It's time to change long-held perceptions and beliefs

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It's time to change long-held perceptions and beliefs

In the last year, women’s equality issues in sports have become a national conversation. It began with the ‘More than Mean’ campaign which highlighted the abuse many women, particularly women in public sports roles, face on social media. The video, which featured men reading vile tweets to the women who received them, sparked an avalanche of coverage from ESPN’s ‘Outside the Lines’ to HBO’s ‘Real Sports.’

The public attention to the misogyny and double standards that still exist in sports media is an important first step, but it's time to move forward and discuss how we turn our anger and frustration into action.

While the name-calling many women receive online is abhorrent, the real problem is rooted in something much more complex -- tradition. 

While some may try, it's hard to deny that women are still viewed by many as the fairer (read: weaker) sex. We have a place in society and often times that place is the box  of “female” roles like caregiver, teacher, mother. 

If women do branch out into a male-dominated career, as many have -- quite successfully -- the emphasis is often placed less on being an asset in the workplace and more on our . . . well, take the ‘ets’ off assets. 

Changing long-held beliefs and perceptions however, is much easier said than done. 

I believe it starts with asking for help. The idea of employing men to help reduce sexism may feel counterintuitive, but I think it's essential. Whether we want to admit it or not, women are outnumbered in athletics and we need advocates from these men -- the majority. 

Sadly, we may also need the validation. While this column is anecdotal and a first-person account, the author is brutally honest when he admits to often not trusting what the average women tells him, including his own wife.

Damon Young writes: 

Generally speaking, we (men) do not believe things when they’re told to us by women. Well, women other than our mothers or teachers or any other woman who happens to be an established authority figure. Do we think women are pathological liars? No. But, does it generally take longer for us to believe something if a woman tells it to us than it would if a man told us the exact same thing? Definitely!

I’m fairly certain I couldn’t throw a baseball in a crowded room without hitting a woman who has been doubted by a male colleague, family member, friend or significant other. 

I feel well-respected in my office, but I also know that there are times when I offer an opinion and I can’t help but wonder if it will be taken lightly until a man pipes in with a similar thought process. I look forward to the day when it’s not even part of my thought process. 

When men stop doubting us, it is inevitable women will believe more strongly in themselves. This doesn't make us weak, it makes us human. I would argue it's the same for a male teacher or stay-at-home dad -- once a female believes in their abilities in that role, the men feel more confidence in themselves.

The other piece to the change puzzle is one which may drum up more emotion and dissent. I think as women we must start sharing some of the responsibility for those old habits taking so long to die.

And before you rush to send me a nasty e-mail, allow me to explain, as this view is by no means a way to shift blame to the victim.

Far too often I have conversations with women who succumb to practices and behaviors they are uncomfortable with, not because they have been explicitly told to act, dress, or perform their job in a specific manner but instead because they default to “that’s what the industry expects.” My response? The industry expects it because we allow it. 

We have a voice, and we can't be afraid to use it. Each time we suffer one small injustice quietly, it becomes harder to speak up when something is really at stake. 

As women we face daily challenges that our male colleagues do not: Judgment and expectations around our physical appearance, doubts about our knowledge, and dismissal of our opinions based simply on our gender. 

We can and should say no to the assumption that our value is based on our looks. Women do not “need” to make beauty and “OOTD” (outfits of the day) the focus of their social-media accounts or the most important facet of their reporting or opining. I know plenty of women who are great journalists and sports minds, not just great female journalists and sports minds. When we allow ourselves to be reduced to nothing more than how we look, it becomes that much more difficult to demand we are seen as more than just a pretty face. This doesn’t mean you shouldn’t flaunt your beauty, but my hope is we don’t hide our brains. 

We can and should say no to the idea that women are best utilized as hosts, social media and sideline reporters. (Not that there is anything wrong with these roles, but it doesn't behoove me to pretend these stereotypes don’t exist.) There is no reason a woman can’t be a prominent insider, talk-show contributor, investigative reporter, etc. . . . see above.

We can and should advocate for more female executives. I can count on one hand the number of females in decision-making positions I have interviewed with during the course of my 17-year career in sports media. We all know smart, talented women in the field. It is our job to make sure the right people are familiar with their work and know how important it is to have a variety of individuals steering the content and journalists they feature on all platforms. 

We can and should advocate for our female colleagues. Sports media is a limited numbers game. In the age of cutbacks, jobs are fewer and further between. I still think it does us all a disservice when we treat any prospective female co-worker as competition. She may have lost, but Hilary Clinton was right when she said we are stronger together. 

All that said, let me clarify that this does not mean blindly supporting all actions because someone is female.,Respect is earned in this industry, no matter your gender.

Our current political and social climate has us consuming more information than ever before. Every cause is met with a hashtag and skepticism. Raising awareness about the issues women face in athletics was a good first step, but it's time to keep moving. Words without action will leave us without anywhere to go.