Brentz eager for shot in Boston

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Brentz eager for shot in Boston

It was a long season for outfielder Bryce Brentz, the longest of his young career. Brentz, the Red Sox second pick (36th overall) in the first round (supplemental) in 2010 out of Middle Tennessee State, played a total of 154 games combined with Double-A Portland, Triple-A Pawtucket, including eight post-season games, and in the Arizona Fall League.

So, it didnt help when he was stranded in Ithaca, NY, for a couple of days earlier this week when his truck broke down on his way from Montreal, where he had left the vehicle after the regular season, to Tennessee, where he was hoping to make it in time for Thanksgiving.

Fortunately, everything worked out. The truck was repaired, and he made it home for the holiday dinner.

It was one of those years for Brentz.

In 122 games with Portland, he hit .296 with 17 home runs, 76 RBI, a .355 on-base percentage, and .478 slugging percentage for Portland, while playing 83 games in right field. He had a season-high 11-game hit streak in August, and recorded eight straight hits over two games in May. Brentz was twice named Eastern League player of the week, including Aug. 20-26, when he hit a league-best .536, going 15-for-28, with two home runs and a league-high 10 RBI, earning a late-season promotion to Pawtucket.

Although Brentz, who turns 24 on Dec. 30, struggled in his five regular-season games with the PawSox, going hitless until the final game of the season, he turned it on in the postseason, going 8-for-27 (.296), with two home runs, a double, a triple, and five RBI, as the PawSox won the International League title.

It was a great experience, Brentz said of his season. Learning, playing in Double A, especially Triple A, the fall league, facing some better talent, older smart pitchers. It was all about, for me, I had to learn discipline at the plate. Im a risk taker and Ive always been one, and when youre a risk taker things are going to happen. Youre going to strike out, maybe not walk as much. But thats just kind of who I am.

In three seasons, Brentz has struck out in 27.4 percent of his at-bats, including 28.8 percent in 2012, one-third of his at-bats with Pawtucket, 29.7 percent in Arizona. Hes working on his approach and his plate discipline.

I want to put myself in good position to take those risks, he said. So when I first got in the season, there was a lot of going up there just swinging from the hip, not really having an approach at the plate. So that was something that me and Portland and Arizona hitting coach Dave Joppie, we had to work on, gaining an approach and figuring out, Hey, you got to earn a fastball. Theyre not going to just give it to you. And I was able to do it. It was overall a good learning experience this year.

The mental adjustments at the plate are more of a challenge than the physical adjustments, Brentz said.

I believe the mental adjustment is always the toughest thing to do, he said. I dont have anything figured out, never will. But I know that if I just stick with the game plan, stick with my approach, let the at-bat take care of itself -- a lot of times I expand the zone because I expand my approach. Actually, its because of the fact that youre worried about this pitch or maybe youre concerned too much about one pitch instead of saying, 'Hey, its just not there. You dont have to swing at it.' The mental side is always tougher than the physical.

In 17 games in Arizona, Brentz hit .297 with two home runs, 11 RBI, and an .804 OPS, being named to the Rising Stars game.

Its a great league, Brentz said. The players obviously are really goodIt was a good experience. These guys are really good, great players. I had a lot of fun, and it was a good time.

Between Portland and Pawtucket Brentz played a combined 87 games in right field, one of several holes the Sox have to fill this offseason. It may not be long before he is playing the position for the major league team.

For me, I believe I share the same view as every guy whos in the minor leagues, whos on the cusp of being in the big leagues, we all look at those type of things, see what theyre doing, what the parent club is doing, Brentz said. For me, with that situation, I want to be there to help out. I hope Im one of the guys in the lineup for the Red Sox. Thats what Im looking forward to. But were all the same. And theyre going to do whats best for the team. Its not the Boston Bryce Brentzes or whatever. Its the Boston Red Sox. And theyre going to do what they have to do for their team, and hopefully Im the right guy that can help them out.

His goals for 2013 are simple.

Hopefully to be in Boston at some point, he said. Thatd be really nice, to start there and play. But it depends on how I do and how I develop and if Im ready for it, which I think I am. But actually thats the goal, is to be in Boston next year.

But, I really dont set number goals. I just want to be productive. Thats all I can ask for.

For now, hes looking forward to enjoying the rest of the offseason, being a normal 23 year old before he heads to Fort Myers for spring training. Hell visit with his family, take some hunting trips with his buddies. Hell be back training and in the weight room after Thanksgiving.

But its good to finally have some time off, he said. It was a very long season.

Acciari notches first NHL goal in Bruins win over Predators

Acciari notches first NHL goal in Bruins win over Predators

BOSTON – It took until his 43rd game in the NHL to finally score his first goal with the Bruins, but Rhode Island native Noel Acciari said it made him appreciate it all the more when that moment finally did arrived on Tuesday night. The 25-year-old Acciari finished off a Riley Nash feed on a 3-on-1 odd-man rush that gave the Bruins an insurance goal they badly needed in a 4-1 win over the Nashville Predators at TD Garden.

Then David Pastrnak hit Acciari with a shaving cream pie to the face during the NESN broadcast as a way to commemorate his teammate’s big scoring moment, and Torey Krug immediately fished the puck out of the net to make certain that Acciari would get it.

So it was the best of both worlds with the team-oriented Acciari, who watched his Bruins win to go right along with his hallmark scoring moment that he’ll remember forever.

“Your first NHL goal is a special feeling and to finally have it, you know, like I said before I couldn’t have done it without the other guys, the other four, five guys on the ice. But it feels good,” said Acciari, who has a goal and four points in 24 games this season in Boston. “It just shows you how special it is. It’s not going to come the first game you play; it could come 10, 20, for me probably over 40, but it still feels the same.”

Clearly it’s more about providing a physical, heavy and aggressive opponent when Acciari suits up for the Black and Gold, and it’s less about providing offensive production that’s really a bonus from the fourth line. The focus on throwing hits, aggravating opponents and playing with extra energy have been a big part of Acciari’s game since his return from Providence, and that is absolutely been by design.

“I think I kind of strayed [from my strengths] when I got back from my injury – I kind of strayed away from the hitting game,” said Acciari. “Just getting in on the fore-check and, you know, just kind of getting back to that down in Providence was huge and kind of get my confidence up down there helped out a lot. So when I got the call up I was ready for anything.”

He’s certainly played like he was ready for anything while posting a goal and two points along with a plus-4 in his first four games back for the Bruins organization. Acciari did all of that while leading everybody in Tuesday night’s game with eight registered hits in the win over Nashville. So the 5-foot-10, 208-pound Acciari gave a pretty good example against the Predators of just what he can do with steady ice time and the trust of his teammates as all of the hockey clubs in the East gear up to finish strong for the playoffs.

Now all Acciari has to do is continue to play consistently, punish opposing players and chip in a little offense from time and time as he carves out a permanent role on Boston’s fourth line, and helps his team win a few along the way. 

Florio on issues NFL may face with Raiders in Las Vegas

Florio on issues NFL may face with Raiders in Las Vegas

Mike Florio joins Quick Slants to discuss the problems of the Raiders moving to Las Vegas, and the latest NFL rule changes.