BREAKING: Roethlisberger's still an idiot

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BREAKING: Roethlisberger's still an idiot

By Mary Paoletti
CSNNE.com

Remember when WGS posted a blog that enumerated why Aaron Rodgers is better than Ben Roethlisberger?

Things we were not trying to accomplish:

1. Sincerely establish that Aaron Rodgers is a better person.

Confusing, right? You'd think that that's EXACTLY what we were trying to do. So why weren't we? Because we don't need to, ya' knuckleheads. All Rodgers has to do is not use babies to bludgeon puppies and he's better than Ben.

2. Claim that crashing a motorcycle was the worst thing Roethlisberger's ever done.

Why would we do that? Motorcycles -- even when somebody Photoshops a sad kitten face onto them -- do not have feelings and so we don't give a crap when they're abused. But women do have feelings and psyches, so we do care when they're sexually assaulted by big, stupid quarterbacks.

The blog was supposed to remind those media outlets slip-sliding in their own Super Bowl drool that Big Ben's Changed Man status is a joke.

The need for people to exonerate Ben Roethlisberger the Man, just because he's carried the Steelers to SB XLV, is crazy. Aaron Rodgers won't get extra points tacked onto each touchdown on Sunday because he's not an idiot and Roethlisberger's TD's won't count for just three because he is an idiot. Personality doesn't factor into the game.

And it's a good thing, too.

"Ben Roethlisberger -- BOOZING at Texas piano bar"

Are we at Wicked Good Sports judging Benny Boy for getting hammered and singing Billy Joel? Nope. At least one of us went to a state school, so there's probably video or photos of "Don't Stop Believing" being drunkenly crooned by us somewhere.

I'm arguing against writing the story that isn't there. Who wanted Roethlisberger to change? Who needed him to change? Who saw what a nice little fairy tale his story of redemption would make and outlined it the day his 4-game suspension ended?

Doesn't matter. If Ben didn't want to change then it doesn't matter. And even if he did? Well, let him do it elsewhere than in my Sports Illustrated.

Here are a few excerpts from stories written between December 30, 2010 and February 7, 2011.

"On the Steelers: Roethlisberger is a changed man"
As more evidence arrived that there is a new and improved Ben Roethlisberger off the field, the Steelers welcome one big change their quarterback has not made.He is the same Big Ben on the field as in the past with a bonus tossed in this season, the lowest interception percentage of his career.

The ONN SportsDome got it right.

Onion SportsDome

"Observers say Big Bens changed man on, off field this season"
Since his return from NFL-ordered exile, Roethlisberger has behaved as if hes living up to his April statement of regret. He has come across as respectful, collaborative, humble, even communitarian. And there have been no new reports of problematic behavior.

Oopsie.

"Chasten the Dream"
"He's just done everything we've asked," says Steelers president Art Rooney II. "He did some soul-searching, and I think he got back to the roots of how he was brought up. There will be doubters for a long time. He's certainly converted a lot of people back."

Those close to Roethlisberger (who declined SI's interview request) see a contrite man learning from mistakes played out on a public stage.

He was asked how the experience of the last year had shaped him. "That's a reflective question, and now's not the time for me to reflect," Roethlisberger said. "Now's the time for me to focus on a really, really big game."

OR, focus on a really, really big quantity of booze.

So who's wrong? The writers, not Roethlisberger.

WATCH: Bruins' Backes battles with Benn right after opening faceoff

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WATCH: Bruins' Backes battles with Benn right after opening faceoff

Now THIS is old-time hockey!

There's bad blood between the Bruins' David Backes and the Stars' Jamie Benn that goes back a long way, most recently in last spring's Dallas-St. Louis playoff series when Backes was still with the Blues. They met again today -- and the ungodly (hockey) hour of 11:30 a.m. Dallas time -- for a nationally televised game between Backes' new team, the Bruins, and the Stars.

And it didn't take long for the two to renew acquaintances . . .

Pistons to honor Hamilton, who had impact on several Celtics

Pistons to honor Hamilton, who had impact on several Celtics

AUBURN HILLS, Mich. -- The Detroit Pistons will retire the jersey number of former UConn star Rip Hamilton tonight, an instrumental figure in the Pistons’ success in the early 2000s that included an NBA title in 2004.
 
Although Hamilton never played for Boston, his impact can be felt within the Celtics locker room.
 
Boston’s Amir Johnson spent his first four NBA seasons as a teammate of Hamilton's in Detroit.
 
In that time, Johnson acknowledges how many of the positive things folks associate with him come from lessons he learned from Hamilton.
 
“He was so relentless when he ran,” Johnson told CSNNE.com. “I remember working out with him one summer. For him to even get his shot off, he sprints full court, goes back down shooting shots, and he just kept doing this over and over and over again, full court sprinting . . . To see that as a young kid, and at his age, just working hard like that, it was great to see.”
 
James Young grew up in nearby Rochester Hills, Mich., so he watched Hamilton’s scoring prowess up close and personal.
 
And as he continued to evolve as a player, Young would see Hamilton during the summer months while attending Hamilton’s basketball camps.
 
“I was there every year, won MVP a few times,” Young told CSNNE.com. “He’s a great guy, a great player.”
 
And, like Hamilton, Young has a lanky frame for an NBA player, which was among the many reasons Young acknowledged Hamilton as being one of his first significant basketball influences as a youth.
 
“For sure,” Young said. “His mid-range game was crazy, great shooter. He was always consistent.”
 
And that consistency has paid off in the highest honor an NBA franchise can bestow upon a player.
 
“That’s big time,” Johnson said. “He’s a champion, great father, great baller. To have his jersey retired is an honor. To see the success he had in the league, and to see his jersey retired with the greats, it's definitely an honor. I’m glad I’ll be there to see that. Kudos to him. He’s a hard worker. Had a great career. I had my high school jersey retired, but to get your NBA jersey retired, that’s great.”
 
Hamilton played 14 seasons in the NBA, nine of which were with the Pistons. A career 17.1 points per game score, he averaged 18.4 with Detroit and was named an Eastern Conference All-Star three times (2006-2008).
 
Although he is known as one of the greatest mid-range shooters of his era, Hamilton began to expand his range over time. During the 2005-06 season, Hamilton shot 45.8 percent from 3-point range (most of them being corner 3’s), which led the NBA that season.