Boston's athlete wish list: Who would you want?

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Boston's athlete wish list: Who would you want?

Here in Boston, weve been fortunate, especially of late, to root for some ridiculously great sports teams. And with those teams, has come an array of exceptional athletes.

In the last 25 years alone, weve cheered on Cy Youngs and batting champs; Hall of Fame defensemen and a legendary (if not wacko) goalie. Weve watched history-making tight ends, perennial Gold Glovers, and the most prolific three-point shooter the world has ever seen. Weve been captivated by one of the greatest power forwards of all time, perhaps the greatest quarterback whos ever lived and an outfielder who once karate-kicked a catcher.

To quote the great Paul Revere: Its been real, bro.

But even amidst all this glory and good fortune, were still missing out. Even in the face of all this success, there are still certain experiences and corners of sports fandom of which weve never enjoyed.

This hit me yesterday while I was writing about Chandler Jones emergence as New Englands most exciting and potentially dominant outside pass rusher in at least five lifetimes. And it got me thinking: What other specific types of athlete whether its a matter of need (as in Chandlers case) or pure aesthetics are on Bostons wish list?

For instance, if wed asked this question five years ago, responses would have included:

You know, its been a long time since weve been blessed with a transcendent point guard.

Will we ever know the excitement of watching a prolific base stealer?

Whats it like to root for a superstar wide receiver?

Thankfully, Rajon Rondo, Jacoby Ellsbury and Randy Moss have since answered the call.

So, whats left?

Here are a few suggestions. Feel free to add your own in the comment section. Also, feel free to not. Either way, no hard feelings.

Game-breaking punt returner: Irving Fryar led the NFL in punt return average in 1985, and Troy Brown did the same in 2001, but neither especially Brown instilled the fear of God in the other team. Just once, wouldn't it be nice to see a punt float through the air and just know that the opposition is collectively soiling their spandex? Or for a team set up for a punt in the waning minutes of a close game, and to hear the announcer say: "They'd be crazy to kick to X here."

Professional dunker: We had Ricky Davis for two seasons, and Gerald Green for basically one. But five years is far too long to go without an athlete who's destined for SportsCenter every time he gets out on the break. Note to Danny Ainge: KEDRICK BROWN IS VERY AVAILABLE.

Wait, he's also 31 years old. Damn.

Centerfield surprise: In 2011, Jacoby Ellsbury became the Red Sox first Gold Glove-winning outfielder since Ellis Burks. But quick, off the top of your head, how many memorable Ellsbury catches come to mind? Nothing really sticks out for me. Ellsbury just isn't that kind of guy. And by that kind of guy I mean a home run-stealing, full-extension-loving, acrobatic freak. I'm talking about guys like Torii Hunter, Jim Edmonds, Ken Griffey Jr. or even Aaron Rowand.

In Ellsburys defense, Sox center fielders are inhibited by a center field wall that (short of spidey senses) is impossible to scale. But the Sox still play half their games on the road, and there are plenty of balls for the nabbing. It's hard to complain about what Ellsbury has done for this team (when healthy), but if he and the Sox part ways, I wouldn't mind them finding a web-gem machine to fill the void.

And yeah, I see you, Jackie Bradley.

50-goal scorer: Cam Neely registered three 50-goal seasons in his career, the last of which came in 1993-1994. Thats also the last time the Bruins have had one (although Glen Murray came close in 2002). In fact, only five players in Bruins history (Neely, Ken Hodge, Rick Middleton, John Bucyk and Philip Anthony Esposito) have eclipsed the mark, and its high time they have another. Hmm, if only there were a young, potential superstar the Bs could draft and sign to a six-year35M extension . . .

All rebounds, all the time: Of all the specialists in professional sports, Ive always had a soft spot for the pure rebounders. The guys like Dennis Rodman, Reggie Evans and Popeye Jones who exist entirely on their willingness to outmuscle, out-hustle and fight like hell for rebounds. The last guy the Celtics had like that was Danny Fortson who averaged a cool 15.4 rebounds per 36 minutes in over his one season here.

Rocket-armed catcher: In the annals of baseball history, there have been more than 500 instances of a catcher throwing out at least 50 percent of potential base stealers. And not since Sammy White in 1958 has one of these catcher played for the Red Sox. (Although, Rich Gedman came close in 1986, throwing out 54 of 109 runners for a .495 clip.) Otherwise, its been pretty ugly. Willie McGee ugly.

OK, so there's six to get you started. What else you got?

Rich can be reached at rlevine@comcastsportsnet.com. Follow Rich on Twitter at http:twitter.comrich_levine

Clayborn beats out Seymour, Vrabel to enter Patriots Hall of Fame

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Clayborn beats out Seymour, Vrabel to enter Patriots Hall of Fame

Raymond Clayborn has been voted into the Patriots Hall of Fame, beating out both Mike Vrabel and Richard Seymour for the honor. The corner, who is tied for the franchise record for interceptions with Ty Law (36), will be the 26th person inducted to the Hall. 

Clayborn was a three-time Pro Bowler (1983, 1985, 1986) during his 13-year Patriots career from 1977 through 1989. He was drafted by the Patriots in the first round (16th overall) out of Texas in 1977, and chipped in both in the secondary and as a kick returner. As a rookie in the return game, he averaged 31 yards per return and brought back three for touchdowns. 

Clayborn reacted to the news on Twitter soon after the announcement was made. 

"I was fortunate to be a season ticket holder during Raymond's entire Patriots career," Patriots Chairman and CEO Robert Kraft said in a statement. "For the first half of his career, he teamed with Michael Haynes to form one of the best corner tandems in league history. Throughout his career, Raymond was a physical, shutdown corner.

"One of my favorite memories was watching the 1985 team advance to the Super Bowl after Raymond helped us break the Orange Bowl curse when he stymied future Hall of Fame quarterback Dan Marino with a dominant performance against Pro Bowl receivers Mark Duper and Mark Clayton. Raymond had six passes defensed and an interception to help us claim our first conference title. It was the greatest upset victory in franchise history at the time and one the entire New England region celebrated. It is a well-deserved honor and I look forward to presenting him his hall of fame jacket."

Clayborn has been a finalist for each of the last four years but was not able to generate enough support in the annual online vote to beat out Ty Law (2014 inductee), Willie McGinest (2015) or Kevin Faulk (2016). Clayborn was eligible to be voted in by the senior committee since he's now been retired for 25 years, but he did not receive the requisite eight of 10 senior committee votes to be elected in that way. 

As it turns out, he didn't need to be. When Kraft called Clayborn with the news, he said Clayborn received over 40 percent of the vote to beat out the pair of three-time Super Bowl champs.