Will Monday be a day of Fame for Tiant?

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Will Monday be a day of Fame for Tiant?

DALLAS -- After failing to be elected in balloting conducted by the Baseball Writers Association of America, former Red Sox pitching great Luis Tiant will get another shot at making the Hall of Fame Monday morning when the results of voting by the Golden Era Committee are announced.

Tiant is one of ten names on the ballot -- eight players and two executives -- whose "most significant career impact was realized during the 1947-72 time period," according to the Hall of Fame.

Successful candidates must be named on 75 percent of the 16 ballots cast.

Tiant had four 20-win seasons in his 19 years in the big leagues, spent with the Cleveland Indians, Minnesota Twins, Red Sox, New York Yankees, Pittsburgh Pirates and California Angels.

He retired with a 229-172 record with a .571 winning percentage and a 3.30 ERA. He was selected to three All-Star games and twice led the American League in ERA while leading the league in shutouts three times.

Tiant's career has often been favorably compared to Jim "Catfish" Hunter, both in terms of career statistics -- Hunter was 224-166 with a .574 winning percentage and a 3.26 ERA -- and their ability to pitch best in big games.

Hunter was elected to Cooperstown in 1987 and passed away in 1999. Tiant, meanwhile, never got enough votes from the BBWAA and was dropped from the ballot.

Red Sox vice president and team historian Dick Bresciani, who is credited with helping Jim Rice get elected in his final year of ballot eligibility, has sent packets of statistical information on Tiant to the 16 voters, highlighting his achievements.

Among other facts, Bresciani has noted:

Tiant was 57-25 (a .675 winning percentage) with a 2.74 in games in September and October.

Tiant has more career wins than 26 other Hall of Fame starting pitchers and a better winning percentage than 26 Hall of Famers.

Of the top 25 career shutout leaders, Tiant (tied for for 21st with 49) is the only one not in the Hall of Fame., who is tied for 21st.

His 49 shutouts are more than 46 Hall of Fame pitchers.

Tiant and Hall of Famer Walter Johnson are the only major league pitchers with two streaks of 40-plus consecutive innings.

Tiant is the only American League pitcher of the last 65 years to post two sub-2.00 ERA seasons. He led the A.L. with a 1.60 ERA in 1968 for Cleveland and a 1.91 ERA in 1972 while with the Red Sox.

Though he never won a Cy Young Award, Tiant finished in the top six in voting three times and was in the top eight in AL MVP voting twice. He also finished in the top eight of strikeouts leaders four times; in the top 10 in strikeouts five times; in the top eight of complete games six times; and in the top nine in shutouts seven
times.

From 1972-1976, Tiant averaged more than 19 wins per season (96-58, .625) with 97 complete games.

Tiant faces stiff competition on this ballot. Other candidates are: Buzzie Bavasi, Ken Boyer, Charlie Finley, Gil Hodges, Jim Kaat, Minnie Minoso, Tony Oliva, Allie Reynolds, and Ron Santo.

Next year's induction will take place on July 22 at Cooperstown. Results of the 2012 BBWAA election will be announced on Jan. 9.

Boston pitchers strike out 14, but Red Sox still fall to Rays, 7-3

Boston pitchers strike out 14, but Red Sox still fall to Rays, 7-3

The appearance of Tampa Bay Rays lefty Ryan Yarbrough almost got the Boston Red Sox back in their spring training exhibition game. The Sox managed to score all three of their runs against the 25-year-old in their 7-3 loss to the Tampa Bay Rays at Charlotte Sports Park in Port Charlotte, Florida on Sunday.

But the Rays, who scored runs in five different innings, managed to widen their lead in the eighth inning by beating up on Sox lefty Luis Isla, a 24-year-old who spent last season with Portland and Pawtucket. In the eighth, Rays' Joe McCarthy homered and Luke Maile managed an RBI single, which cappped off the scoring in the contest. Sox starter Hector Velazquez allowed three hits and an earned run in his two innnings. The 28-year-old, who spent 2016 in the Mexican League, still managed to amass four strikeouts.

"I was a little nervous at the start, being in the United States for the first time and playing for a big league club for the first time," Velazquez told RedSox.com through an interpreter. "But once I got the first out, all the nerves went away, and I was able to bear down."

Despite allowing two homers, Boston pitchers combined for 14 strikeouts.

With the exception of the Sox' inning against Yarbrough, Boston's veterans and prospects struggled mighltily against the Rays pitching staff. Chris Archer started for Tampa, and set the tone in the first two innings, where he threw two strikeouts, one walk and allowed one hit and no runs. Andrew Benintendi (0-for-3), Sam Travis (0-for-2) and Bryce Brentz (0-for-3) went hitless on the day. Travis, however, reached base on balls.

"I felt good. I accomplished what I wanted to accomplish," Archer said, via the Red Sox' team website. "Just out there having fun, it was really fun to be out there in the spectrum with the umpire, the fans, the batter. It was fun."

Marco Hernandez's triple got the Sox' eighth-inning off to a strong start, and singles from Matt Dominguez, Deven Marrero, Rusney Castillo and Cole Sturgeon followed. The Sox' eighth inning scoring ended after Castillo got thrown out by left fielder McCarthy at third. Six Red Sox finished with one-hit outings, including Brock Holt and Blake Swihart.

The Sox will next host the St. Louis Cardinals in Fort Myers on Monday at 1:05 p.m. ET.