Wakeup Call: Manage without me, says Lowell

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Wakeup Call: Manage without me, says Lowell

Here's your wakeup call -- a combination of newsworthy andor interesting tidbits -- for Tuesday, October 9:

BASEBALL
The Orioles tied up their series against the Yankees, and now head to New York needing to win two out of three. Thing is, they've already done exactly that this year . . . twice. (CSN Baltimore)

Dan Duquette's enjoying the ride. (CSN Baltimore)

Now that's the Jim Johnson we remember! (NBCs Hardball Talk)

Buck Showalter's not a big fan of some Orioles marketer's bright idea: The BUCKleUp campaign. (CSN Baltimore)

So that's a single, a walk, and five strikeouts in 10 plate appearances for Alex Rodriguez so far in the ALDS. Any wonder cries to remove him from the No. 3 spot in the order have begun? (Hardball Talk)

The Cardinals bounced back nicely in Game 2. (AP)

The Nationals worked all year for home-field advantage, and this is why. (CSN Washington)

Eight years ago the Red Sox asked, "Why not us?" Now the A's, in an 0-2 hole to the Tigers, ask, "Why the hell not?" (CSN Bay Area)

Sometimes, says Al Alburquerque, a kiss is just a kiss. (CSN Bay Area)

With their season hanging by a thread, the Giants aren't going to entrust things to Tim Lincecum. (AP)

There are managing jobs open in Boston and Colorado right now, and it's expected Miami will have one very soon. Mike Lowell, however, says don't bother calling me. (Hardball Talk)

COLLEGE FOOTBALL
Jerry Sandusky will be sentenced today. (AP)

Remember Al Groh, a Patriots assistant under Bill Parcells who also was head coach of the Jets and the University of Virginia? He's out of a job. (AP)

Jimbo Fisher's catching some heat at Florida State, but he's not second-guessing himself for some questionable calls in the Seminoles' 17-16 loss at North Carolina State. (AP)

Every number in Miami is trending the wrong way except one: The ACC won-loss record. (AP)

Iowa apparently isn't going let a little thing like an arrest keep Michah Hyde from playing against Michigan State this weekend. (AP)

GOLF
Tiger Woods had two words to his teammates for his Ryder Cup performance: I'm sorry. (golfchannel.com)

Still, he'd like to captain the team . . . some day. (AP)

HOCKEY
With each passing hour the owners are realizing -- or should be realizing -- that this is not their fathers' NHLPA, not with the Fehrs in charge. (NBC's Pro Hockey Talk) Whether this changes their traditional take-no-prisoners negotiating strategy remains to be seen.

The Caps' Karl Alzner is getting a "pox on both their houses" vibe from the fans. (CSN Washington)

The Blackhawks players, tired of running their own practices, have hired a coach to do it for them. (CSN Chicago)

PRO BASKETBALL
Kobe Bryant may not be at the finish line just yet, but he can see it. (NBC's Pro Basketball Talk)

So were we, Marcus. So were we. (CSN Houston)

Remember Tracy McGrady's close relationship with Yao Ming during their days in Houston? In the business world, they call that "networking". (Pro Basketball Talk)

Maybe McGrady will run into the Heat when he starts his new job. (AP)

PRO FOOTBALL
The Texans are still unbeaten, thanks to their 23-17 win over the Jets. But not unbloodied, thanks to an injury to linebacker Brian Cushing. (CSN Houston)

The NFL is about to lose one of its former greats, as Alex Karras apparently has only days to live. (AP)

Sounds like James Harrison has learned his lesson after all these years. (NBC's Pro Football Talk)

Terrell Suggs is a fast healer . . . but not that fast. (Pro Football Talk)

Now RGIII, he's a fast healer. (AP)

The rigors of NFL season are beginning to take their toll. The casualty list heading into Week Six: Troy Polamalu out, Ryan Williams gone for the year, Jake Locker still sidelined and Matt Cassel unlikely. (All AP)

At least Joe Haden didn't pull out the "I didn't know what I was taking" line. (AP)

Fumbles, schmumbles. Right, Michael Vick? (CSN Philly)

David Ortiz re-enacts Boston movie scenes as part of charity video

David Ortiz re-enacts Boston movie scenes as part of charity video

As part of a charity promotion with Omaze, David Ortiz has made a video re-enacting scenes from Boston-set movies. 

The movies range from a classic -- "Good Will Hunting" -- to very good crime movies -- "The Departed, The Town" — to the just plain bad "Fever Pitch," but all of the scenes are entertaining. Ortiz plays every part in each scene, often playing to characters interacting with one another. 

At the end of the video, a link is given to Omaze.com/papi, which gives fans the opportunity to enter a drawing to attend his jersey retirement ceremony by donating. Proceeds go to the David Ortiz Children’s Fund and the Red Sox Foundation. 

The David Ortiz Children Fund aims to help children in New England and the Dominican Republic who are born with congenital heart failure. 
 

Drellich: When will Red Sox players hold themselves accountable?

Drellich: When will Red Sox players hold themselves accountable?

BOSTON -- Whether John Farrell is managing the Red Sox next week or next month, keep an eye on player accountability.

Five years ago, Bobby Valentine was supposed to be the disciplinarian that stopped babying the clubhouse. Disaster followed, largely because Valentine was a terrible fit for this group, his approach extreme and dated.

But this year’s team makes you wonder whether a distilled sense of Red Sox entitlement lingers.

At Fenway Park, is the message from the veteran voices one that includes a sense of public accountability for not just the manager, but the players as well?

In FOX Sports’ Ken Rosenthal’s piece on Farrell, Rosenthal noted “some players, but not all, believe that [Farrell] does not stand up for them strongly enough to the media.”

Those unnamed players Rosenthal cites need a mirror, badly. Or at least a glance around the room.

Where’s the guy in the clubhouse standing up to the media with any consistency? There’s no voice that regularly shields the younger, less experienced guys from tough but expected questions after losses.

Dustin Pedroia gets dressed and leaves the clubhouse faster than Chris Sale will get the ball back and throw it Wednesday. 

Pedroia mentioned something about whale poop in Oakland over the weekend. He can be very funny, but he’s not exactly keen to deliver calming, state-of-the-union addresses — not with frequency, anyway.

Farrell, of course, has been criticized for doing the opposite of what the FOX Sports story noted. The manager was mobbed on social media last year for saying David Price had good stuff on a day Price himself said the opposite.

The premise here is amusing, if you think about it.

Follow: Players are upset that the manager does not do a better job lying about their performance. And this, in turn, affects how players play?

Get a grip.

The public isn’t dumb. If you’re bad, you’re bad, and you’re going to hear about it in Boston. No manager changes that.

Whichever Sox player seeks more protection from Farrell really needs a reminder from a teammate to play better.

Too often, some of the most famous, prominent athletes can be sensitive, and over-sensitive. Look at how LeBron James handled a question about what led to his poor performance in Game 3 of the Eastern Conference finals.

It is true that some players question Farrell’s leadership, as Rosenthal reported. But it can also be difficult to separate questions of leadership from whining and grumbling that a manager isn’t providing said player more chances, more opportunities, even if undeserved.

How can Drew Pomeranz's unfounded dugout complaints be Farrell's fault?

The situation and player that make Farrell look the worst this year is Hanley Ramirez. The idea of him playing first base is gone, his shoulders apparently too screwed up to make that viable. 

Somehow, Ramirez made 133 starts at first base last year. One has to wonder how all of a sudden Ramirez can barely play a single game. 

If he’s hurt, he’s hurt. But the Sox didn’t come out of the gate in spring training and say, first base is out of the picture because of his health. They kept saying there was hope he'd be able to play in the field.

If Ramirez is being obstinate, he’s in turn making Farrell look weak. And, more importantly, hurting his team.

What would Ramirez be doing if David Ortiz hadn't retired? Spending the year on the disabled list?

Farrell can pack up his bags today, tomorrow or after the next full moon. The players would still need to take it upon themselves to do what’s best for their team: to focus on what matters.

If they’ve forgotten, that’s about performing up to their abilities and being accountable for themselves -- publicly and privately -- when they don’t.

A manager’s quote in the media doesn’t change whether you’re playing bad baseball.