Boston Red Sox

Wakeup Call: Manage without me, says Lowell

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Wakeup Call: Manage without me, says Lowell

Here's your wakeup call -- a combination of newsworthy andor interesting tidbits -- for Tuesday, October 9:

BASEBALL
The Orioles tied up their series against the Yankees, and now head to New York needing to win two out of three. Thing is, they've already done exactly that this year . . . twice. (CSN Baltimore)

Dan Duquette's enjoying the ride. (CSN Baltimore)

Now that's the Jim Johnson we remember! (NBCs Hardball Talk)

Buck Showalter's not a big fan of some Orioles marketer's bright idea: The BUCKleUp campaign. (CSN Baltimore)

So that's a single, a walk, and five strikeouts in 10 plate appearances for Alex Rodriguez so far in the ALDS. Any wonder cries to remove him from the No. 3 spot in the order have begun? (Hardball Talk)

The Cardinals bounced back nicely in Game 2. (AP)

The Nationals worked all year for home-field advantage, and this is why. (CSN Washington)

Eight years ago the Red Sox asked, "Why not us?" Now the A's, in an 0-2 hole to the Tigers, ask, "Why the hell not?" (CSN Bay Area)

Sometimes, says Al Alburquerque, a kiss is just a kiss. (CSN Bay Area)

With their season hanging by a thread, the Giants aren't going to entrust things to Tim Lincecum. (AP)

There are managing jobs open in Boston and Colorado right now, and it's expected Miami will have one very soon. Mike Lowell, however, says don't bother calling me. (Hardball Talk)

COLLEGE FOOTBALL
Jerry Sandusky will be sentenced today. (AP)

Remember Al Groh, a Patriots assistant under Bill Parcells who also was head coach of the Jets and the University of Virginia? He's out of a job. (AP)

Jimbo Fisher's catching some heat at Florida State, but he's not second-guessing himself for some questionable calls in the Seminoles' 17-16 loss at North Carolina State. (AP)

Every number in Miami is trending the wrong way except one: The ACC won-loss record. (AP)

Iowa apparently isn't going let a little thing like an arrest keep Michah Hyde from playing against Michigan State this weekend. (AP)

GOLF
Tiger Woods had two words to his teammates for his Ryder Cup performance: I'm sorry. (golfchannel.com)

Still, he'd like to captain the team . . . some day. (AP)

HOCKEY
With each passing hour the owners are realizing -- or should be realizing -- that this is not their fathers' NHLPA, not with the Fehrs in charge. (NBC's Pro Hockey Talk) Whether this changes their traditional take-no-prisoners negotiating strategy remains to be seen.

The Caps' Karl Alzner is getting a "pox on both their houses" vibe from the fans. (CSN Washington)

The Blackhawks players, tired of running their own practices, have hired a coach to do it for them. (CSN Chicago)

PRO BASKETBALL
Kobe Bryant may not be at the finish line just yet, but he can see it. (NBC's Pro Basketball Talk)

So were we, Marcus. So were we. (CSN Houston)

Remember Tracy McGrady's close relationship with Yao Ming during their days in Houston? In the business world, they call that "networking". (Pro Basketball Talk)

Maybe McGrady will run into the Heat when he starts his new job. (AP)

PRO FOOTBALL
The Texans are still unbeaten, thanks to their 23-17 win over the Jets. But not unbloodied, thanks to an injury to linebacker Brian Cushing. (CSN Houston)

The NFL is about to lose one of its former greats, as Alex Karras apparently has only days to live. (AP)

Sounds like James Harrison has learned his lesson after all these years. (NBC's Pro Football Talk)

Terrell Suggs is a fast healer . . . but not that fast. (Pro Football Talk)

Now RGIII, he's a fast healer. (AP)

The rigors of NFL season are beginning to take their toll. The casualty list heading into Week Six: Troy Polamalu out, Ryan Williams gone for the year, Jake Locker still sidelined and Matt Cassel unlikely. (All AP)

At least Joe Haden didn't pull out the "I didn't know what I was taking" line. (AP)

Fumbles, schmumbles. Right, Michael Vick? (CSN Philly)

Red Sox rally for 5-4 win over Reds, extend AL East lead

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Red Sox rally for 5-4 win over Reds, extend AL East lead

CINCINNATI - Rafael Devers hit a three-run homer Friday night, and the Boston Red Sox extended their AL East lead to four games by overcoming Scooter Gennett's fourth grand slam of the season for a 5-4 victory over the Cincinnati Reds.

Boston added to its lead with the help of the Yankees' 8-1 loss at Toronto. The Red Sox have won 12 of 15, keeping the Yankees at bay while moving a season-high 25 games over .500 (89-64).

Their AL Cy Young Award winner is still struggling heading into playoff time.

Rick Porcello gave up Gennett's fourth grand slam - a Reds' season record - in the first inning. He lasted a season-low four innings, turning a 5-4 lead over to the bullpen. Porcello has lost 17 games - most in the majors - after winning 22 last year along with the Cy Young.

Part of Porcello's problem has been a lack of run support. Boston has been blanked while he's on the mound in 10 of his losses. This time, the Red Sox got him off the hook, overcoming Gennett's career-high 27th homer with the help of Devers' three-run shot off Sal Romano (5-7).

The Red Sox are last in the AL with 159 homers.

Left-hander David Price (6-3) pitched 2 2/3 innings and contributed a single, bringing the Red Sox to the front of the dugout for a celebration. Craig Kimbrel pitched the ninth for his 34th save in 38 chances. He hasn't allowed a run in his last 10 appearances.

Gennett was claimed off waivers from Milwaukee late in spring training. He has provided some of the Reds' best moments in an 88-loss season, including a four-homer game on June 6. His homer off Porcello ended the Red Sox' streak of 26 straight scoreless innings.

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Drellich: Pomeranz, league's second-best lefty, knows how to be even better

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Drellich: Pomeranz, league's second-best lefty, knows how to be even better

BOSTON — Drew Pomeranz may not actually be the No. 2 starter for the Red Sox in this year’s presumed American League Division Series. Maybe the Sox will mix in a right-hander between Pomeranz and Chris Sale.

Still, everyone knows which pitcher, in spirit, has been the second-most reliable for the Red Sox. A day after Chris Sale notched his 300th strikeout and on the final off-day of the regular season, it’s worth considering the importance of the other excellent lefty on the Sox, and how much he’s meant to a team that’s needed surprise performances because of the lineup’s drop-off.

Per FanGraphs’ wins above replacement, Pomeranz is the second-most valuable lefthanded starter among those qualified in the American League (you know who's No. 1). He's one of the 10 best starters in the AL overall.

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Pomeranz, 28, was a first-round pick seven years ago. But he didn’t exactly blossom until the last two years. He has a 3.15 ERA in 165 2/3 innings. His next start, if decent, should give him a career-high in innings after he threw 170 2/3 last year.

Pomeranz is a 16-game winner, just one win behind Sale. The value of wins and losses is known to be nil, but there’s still a picture of reliability that can be gleaned.

Is this the year Pomeranz became the pitcher he always envisioned he would be?

“I don’t know, I mean, I had a pretty dang good year last year,” Pomeranz said, referring to a 3.32 ERA between the Padres and Sox, and an All-Star selection. “I think these last two years have been kind of you know, more what I wanted to be like. But I still, I don’t think I’m done yet, you know what I mean?”

Most pro athletes say there’s always room to improve. Pomeranz, however, was able to specify what he wants. The focus is on his third and fourth pitches: his cutter and his change-up. 

“My changeup’s been really good this year,” Pomeranz said. “That’s something that still can go a lot further. And same with my cutter too. I still use it sparingly. I don’t think me just being a six-inning guy is the end of it for me either.

“You set personal goals. You want to throw more innings, cover more innings so the bullpen doesn’t have to cover those. Helps save them for right now during the year.”

Early in the year, Pomeranz wasn’t using his cutter much. He threw just nine in April, per BrooksBaseball.net. That led to talk that he wasn’t throwing the pitch to take it easy on his arm. He did start the year on the disabled list, after all, and cutters and sliders can be more stressful on the elbow and forearm.

That wasn’t the case.

“The reason I didn’t throw it in the beginning of the year was because half the times I threw it went the other way,” Pomeranz said. “It backed up. Instead of cutting, it was like sinking or running back. I mean, I pitched [in Baltimore] and gave up a home run to [Manny] Machado, we were trying to throw one in and it went back. So I didn’t trust it.

“Mechanical thing. I was still trying to clean my mechanics up, and once I cleaned ‘em up and got my arm slot right, then everything started moving the way it was supposed to and then I started throwing it more.”

Pomeranz’s cutter usage, and how he developed the pitch heading into 2016, has been well documented.

The change-up is more of an X-factor. He threw five in each of his last two starts, per Brooks, and it’s a pitch he wants to use more.

“It’s been good,” Pomeranz said. “I think I could throw it a lot more and a lot more effectively, and ... tweaking of pitch selection probably could help me get into some of those later innings too.”

Well, then why not just throw the change more often? Easier said than done when you’re talking about your fourth pitch in a key moment.

“I throw a few a game,” Pomeranz said. “Sometimes you feel like you don’t want too throw it in situations where you get beat with your third or fourth best pitch. I mean it’s felt — every time I’ve thrown it it’s been consistent. It’s just a matter of, it’s something me and Vazqy [Christian Vazquez] talk about, too." 

(When you hear these kind of issues, which most pitchers deal with, it makes you appreciate Sale’s ability to throw any pitch at any time even more.)

Speaking on Wednesday, the day after Pomeranz’s most recent outing, Sox pitching coach Carl Willis said he thinks the change-up’s already starting to have a greater presence.

“He’s kind of always had a changeup, and he hadn’t had any trust or conviction in that pitch,” Willis said. “I was really excited last night that he used the changeup more. He threw it. He doubled up with it on occasion. Something that’s not in the scouting report.

"It’s his fourth pitch and he seldom threw it in a game and he’s in a situation where, OK, the change-up’s the right pitch, but location of whatever I throw is going to outweigh [selection]. Now he’s starting to gain that confidence [that he can locate it]. 

“I think that’s going to make him an extremely better pitcher. I thought it was a huge factor in his outing last night. Because he didn’t have his best velocity. He really did a good job of changing speeds with the changeup, and obviously with the curveball and being able to give different shapes of the pitches.”

The Sox already have the best left-hander in the AL, if not anywhere. The AL's second-best southpaw happens to pitch on the same team, and has tangible plans to be even better.

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