Wakeup Call: King Felix is staying put

845531.jpg

Wakeup Call: King Felix is staying put

Here's your wakeup call -- a combination of newsworthy andor interesting tidbits -- for Friday, February 8.

AUTO RACING
They don't induct bats into the Baseball Hall of Fame, or helmets into the Pro Football Hall of Fame. But in NASCAR, cars get in. (AP)

BASEBALL
Is anyone really surprised that King Felix is staying in Seattle? (AP)

Please don't rush to judgment? In our society? Michael, you must be kidding. (AP)

Old friends Mike Aviles and Kelly Shoppach have new contracts. (AP)

What's that old saying, that if you can hit a curveball you can get away with murder in baseball? Well, with the Giants, you can get away with being accused of murder. (NBC's Hardball Talk)

COLLEGE BASKETBALL
Indiana's reign as the nation's No. 1 team probably won't last long, not after the Hoosiers' last-second loss at Illinois. (AP)

Duke gets its revenge on slumping North Carolina State. (AP)

Yeah, I never heard of Nate Wolters, either. But the South Dakota State guard scored 53 points, most for a Division I player this season, in an 80-74 victory over IPFW. (AP)

Missouri's not going to stay in the Top 25 much longer if it can't figure out how to win on the road. (AP)

Florida's sixth man, Will Yaguete, is lost for at least the rest of the regular season after undergoing knee surgery. (AP)

Notre Dame spills the beans: It looks the Big East is going to stay together for at least one more year. (AP)

COLLEGE FOOTBALL
According to her lawyers, poor Andrea McDonald is "exploring her options" during this "difficult time." And what's the "difficult time"? Her son wants to go to Arkansas instead of Miami. So, what, she's going to sue him? (NBC's College Football Talk)

That anonymous letter sent out by "UNM Senior Football Players" claiming New Mexico coach Bob Davie discriminates against players based on race is "unfounded and untrue" according to the university, which says it investigated the charges. (AP)

He broke some of RGIII's records at Baylor and was second only to Johnny Football in total yards per game, but Nick Florence is saying no to the NFL and will focus on getting his master's degree instead. (AP)

Nebraska and Colorado will resume their rivalry, beginning in 2018. (AP)

Well, it helps when your stadium seats 109,901. (AP)

GOLF
As long as they keep scheduling it during the week of school vacation, Phil Mickelson's going to keep skipping the Match Play Championship. (AP)

HOCKEY
Whaddya know? Phil Kessel finally scored! (AP)

These are your new fans, Tim Thomas. (NBC's Pro Hockey Talk)

I mean, you didn't see Ranger fans cheering when this guy took one in the face, did you? (Pro Hockey Talk)

Can anyone stop the Blackhawks? (CSN Chicago)

Adam Oates' Wednesday contention that the Capitals were heading in the right direction looks kind of silly now, doesn't it? (CSN Washington)

Their hard-fought loss to the Bruins apparently took something out of them, because the Canadiens couldn't hold a two-goal, third-period lead and lost in a shootout to the stumbling Sabres. (AP)

Methinks though dost protest too much, Barry. (Pro Hockey Talk)

Ken Hitchcock reminds the Blues that there's no 'i' in team. (Pro Hockey Talk)

OLYMPICS
Mike Krzyewski may return as U.S. coach in 2016, after all. (AP)

PRO BASKETBALL
Ooh. Trouble in paradise! (NBC's Pro Basketball Talk)

Real trouble! (Pro Basketball Talk)

Since Tom Thibodeau took over as coach, the Bulls have rarely gotten blown out. Last night, though, was different. (CSN Chicago)

Kevin Love apparently has decided on the glass-is-half-full outlook. (AP)

Let's hope Lou Williams can do the same. (AP)

PRO FOOTBALL
Deer antlers?? Why, in Tony Casillas' day, they used DSMO! (NBC's Pro Football Talk)

2,097 yards rushing with a sports hernia. If the phrases "deer antlers" and "DSMO" -- and other things -- leap to mind, I get it. (AP)

Gregg Williams is full of apologies and mea culpas as he gratefully accepts his reinstatement and takes a job with the Titans. (AP)

The Ravens are enjoying the present but -- unlike the last time they won the Super Bowl -- still looking to the future. (AP)

Too bad. Would have been fun to see an assistant coach dance his way onto the field before a game. (CSN Baltimore)

So the good folks of Baltimore will have to get their weekly Ray Lewis fix from a statue of him that's being planned. (Pro Football Talk)

We got a sneak preview of that statue on the field during the Super Bowl. (CSN Bay Area)

Jim Harbaugh's still crying about the non-call on the 49ers' last offensive play. (Pro Football Talk)

The Bills are going to let Donald Jones become a free agent. (AP)

The Colts may do the same with Dwight Freeney . . . but he hopes they don't. (Pro Football Talk)

And the Steelers? They may be saying goodbye to lots of their veterans. (Pro Football Talk)

Ortiz: 'A super honor' to have number retired by Red Sox

Ortiz: 'A super honor' to have number retired by Red Sox

BOSTON —  The Red Sox have become well known for their ceremonies, for their pull-out-all-the-stops approach to pomp. The retirement of David Ortiz’s No. 34 on Friday evening was in one way, then, typical.

A red banner covered up Ortiz’s No. 34 in right field, on the facade of the grandstand, until it was dropped down as Ortiz, his family, Red Sox ownership and others who have been immortalized in Fenway lore looked on. Carl Yazstremski and Jim Rice, Wade Boggs and Pedro Martinez. 

The half-hour long tribute further guaranteed permanence to a baseball icon whose permanence in the city and the sport was never in doubt. But the moments that made Friday actually feel special, rather than expected, were stripped down and quick. 

Dustin Pedroia’s not one to belabor many points, never been the most effusive guy around. (He’d probably do well on a newspaper deadline.) The second baseman spoke right before Ortiz took to the podium behind the mound.

“We want to thank you for not the clutch hits, the 500 home runs, we want to thank you for how you made us feel and it’s love,” Pedroia said, with No. 34 painted into both on-deck circles and cut into the grass in center field. “And you’re not our teammate, you’re not our friend, you’re our family. … Thank you, we love you.”

Those words were enough for Ortiz to have tears in his eyes.

“Little guy made me cry,” Ortiz said, wiping his hands across his face. “I feel so grateful. I thank God every day for giving me the opportunity to have the career that I have. But I thank God even more for giving me the family and what I came from, who teach me how to try to do everything the right way. Nothing — not money — nothing is better than socializing with the people that are around you, get familiar with, show them love, every single day. It’s honor to get to see my number …. I remember hitting batting practice on this field, I always was trying to hit those numbers.”

Now that’s a poignant image for a left-handed slugger at Fenway Park.

He did it once, he said — hit the numbers. He wasn’t sure when. Somewhere in 2011-13, he estimated — but he said he hit Bobby Doerr’s No. 1.

“It was a good day to hit during batting practice,” Ortiz remembered afterward in a press conference. “But to be honest with you, I never thought I’d have a chance to hit the ball out there. It’s pretty far. My comment based on those numbers was, like, I started just getting behind the history of this organization. Those guys, those numbers have a lot of good baseball in them. It takes special people to do special things and at the end of the day have their number retired up there, so that happening to me today, it’s a super honor to be up there, hanging with those guys.”

The day was all about his number, ultimately, and his number took inspiration from the late Kirby Puckett. Ortiz’s major league career began with the Twins in 1997. Puckett passed away in 2006, but the Red Sox brought his children to Fenway Park. They did not speak at the podium or throw a ceremonial first pitch, but their presence likely meant more than, say, Jason Varitek’s or Tim Wakefield’s.

“Oh man, that was very emotional,” Ortiz said. “I’m not going to lie to you, like, when I saw them coming toward me, I thought about Kirby. A lot. That was my man, you know. It was super nice to see his kids. Because I remember, when they were little guys, little kids. Once I got to join the Minnesota Twins, Kirby was already working in the front office. So they were, they used to come in and out. I used to get to see them. But their dad was a very special person for me and that’s why you saw me carry the No. 34 when I got here. It was very special to get to see them, to get kind of connected with Kirby somehow someway.”

Ortiz’s place in the row of 11 retired numbers comes in between Boggs’ No. 26 and Jackie Robinson’s No. 42.

Red Sox claim RHP Doug Fister off waivers, sign INF Jhonny Peralta

Red Sox claim RHP Doug Fister off waivers, sign INF Jhonny Peralta

 

BOSTON — They have the right idea, if not yet the right personnel.

Red Sox president of baseball operations Dave Dombrowski has brought on a pair of former Tigers in an effort to help the Red Sox’ depth.

It’s hard to expect much from righty Doug Fister — who mostly throws in the 80s these days and is to start Sunday — or from Jhonny Peralta, who’s going to play some third base at Triple-A Pawtucket. Fister was claimed off waivers from the Angels, who coincidentally started a three-game series with the Red Sox on Friday at Fenway Park. Peralta, meanwhile, was signed as a free agent to a minor league deal.

Neither may prove much help. Fister could move to the bullpen when Eduardo Rodriguez is ready to return, Sox president of baseball operations Dave Dombrowski said. The Sox hope E-Rod is back in time for the All-Star break.

That’s assuming Fister is pitching well enough that the Sox want to keep him.

But at least the Sox are being proactive looking for help, and it’s not like either Peralta or Fister is high-risk.

Fister, 33, threw 180 1/3 innings last year with the Astros, posting a 4.64 ERA. He hasn’t been in the big leagues yet this season.

Said one American League talent evaluator earlier this year about Fister’s 2016: “Had a nice first half. Then struggled vs. left-handed hitters and with finishing hitters. No real putaway pitch. Has ability to pitch around the zone, reliable dude.”