Wakefield rocked as Sox fall hard again, 9-2

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Wakefield rocked as Sox fall hard again, 9-2

By Maureen Mullen
CSNNE.com

BOSTON The Twins entered Friday nights game with a record of 11-18, one of just two teams with a worse record in the American League than the Red Sox. They were the worst team in baseball at scoring runs, with just 89 this season. Their pitchers had allowed 151 runs, tied for fourth-most. Those numbers did little to help the Red Sox Friday night at Fenway, as they fell to the Twins 9-2 at Fenway Park.

Over the last two games, Red Sox starting pitching has sorely been lacking. Friday night it was Tim Wakefields turn. Starting in place of Daisuke Matsuzaka, who was pushed back to Sunday after pitching an inning of relief, and taking the loss, in Wednesdays marathon game with the Angels, Wakefield lasted just 4 13 innings against the Twins, his second start of the season. He allowed eight runs (six earned) on nine hits and four walks with a strikeout and was called for a balk.

Wakefield gave up a solo home run in the first inning to Trevor Plouffe in his first plate appearance of the season. He gave up three more runs in the second, including one on a balk. Manager Terry Francona came out to discuss the call with home plate umpire Angel Hernandez and was ejected.

In the fifth, Wakefield gave up a walk and four hits while recording just one out, before giving way to Alfredo Aceves, who was called up before the game. Wakefield left two runners on base for Aceves. After Aceves struck out his first batter, the Twins scored two more on Jed Lowries first of two errors on the night. Wakefield took the loss, falling to 0-1 with a 5.73 ERA.

The Sox' offense, meanwhile, could do little with Twins starter Scott Baker, who went eight innings, giving up two runs on seven hits and a walk, with eight strikeouts. The two runs came on solo homers by J.D. Drew in the second and Adrian Gonzalez in the fourth. Baker earned the win, improving to 2-2, with a 2.97 ERA.

With the loss, the Sox fall to 14-18.

David Ortiz re-enacts Boston movie scenes as part of charity video

David Ortiz re-enacts Boston movie scenes as part of charity video

As part of a charity promotion with Omaze, David Ortiz has made a video re-enacting scenes from Boston-set movies. 

The movies range from a classic -- "Good Will Hunting" -- to very good crime movies -- "The Departed, The Town" — to the just plain bad "Fever Pitch," but all of the scenes are entertaining. Ortiz plays every part in each scene, often playing to characters interacting with one another. 

At the end of the video, a link is given to Omaze.com/papi, which gives fans the opportunity to enter a drawing to attend his jersey retirement ceremony by donating. Proceeds go to the David Ortiz Children’s Fund and the Red Sox Foundation. 

The David Ortiz Children Fund aims to help children in New England and the Dominican Republic who are born with congenital heart failure. 
 

Drellich: When will Red Sox players hold themselves accountable?

Drellich: When will Red Sox players hold themselves accountable?

BOSTON -- Whether John Farrell is managing the Red Sox next week or next month, keep an eye on player accountability.

Five years ago, Bobby Valentine was supposed to be the disciplinarian that stopped babying the clubhouse. Disaster followed, largely because Valentine was a terrible fit for this group, his approach extreme and dated.

But this year’s team makes you wonder whether a distilled sense of Red Sox entitlement lingers.

At Fenway Park, is the message from the veteran voices one that includes a sense of public accountability for not just the manager, but the players as well?

In FOX Sports’ Ken Rosenthal’s piece on Farrell, Rosenthal noted “some players, but not all, believe that [Farrell] does not stand up for them strongly enough to the media.”

Those unnamed players Rosenthal cites need a mirror, badly. Or at least a glance around the room.

Where’s the guy in the clubhouse standing up to the media with any consistency? There’s no voice that regularly shields the younger, less experienced guys from tough but expected questions after losses.

Dustin Pedroia gets dressed and leaves the clubhouse faster than Chris Sale will get the ball back and throw it Wednesday. 

Pedroia mentioned something about whale poop in Oakland over the weekend. He can be very funny, but he’s not exactly keen to deliver calming, state-of-the-union addresses — not with frequency, anyway.

Farrell, of course, has been criticized for doing the opposite of what the FOX Sports story noted. The manager was mobbed on social media last year for saying David Price had good stuff on a day Price himself said the opposite.

The premise here is amusing, if you think about it.

Follow: Players are upset that the manager does not do a better job lying about their performance. And this, in turn, affects how players play?

Get a grip.

The public isn’t dumb. If you’re bad, you’re bad, and you’re going to hear about it in Boston. No manager changes that.

Whichever Sox player seeks more protection from Farrell really needs a reminder from a teammate to play better.

Too often, some of the most famous, prominent athletes can be sensitive, and over-sensitive. Look at how LeBron James handled a question about what led to his poor performance in Game 3 of the Eastern Conference finals.

It is true that some players question Farrell’s leadership, as Rosenthal reported. But it can also be difficult to separate questions of leadership from whining and grumbling that a manager isn’t providing said player more chances, more opportunities, even if undeserved.

How can Drew Pomeranz's unfounded dugout complaints be Farrell's fault?

The situation and player that make Farrell look the worst this year is Hanley Ramirez. The idea of him playing first base is gone, his shoulders apparently too screwed up to make that viable. 

Somehow, Ramirez made 133 starts at first base last year. One has to wonder how all of a sudden Ramirez can barely play a single game. 

If he’s hurt, he’s hurt. But the Sox didn’t come out of the gate in spring training and say, first base is out of the picture because of his health. They kept saying there was hope he'd be able to play in the field.

If Ramirez is being obstinate, he’s in turn making Farrell look weak. And, more importantly, hurting his team.

What would Ramirez be doing if David Ortiz hadn't retired? Spending the year on the disabled list?

Farrell can pack up his bags today, tomorrow or after the next full moon. The players would still need to take it upon themselves to do what’s best for their team: to focus on what matters.

If they’ve forgotten, that’s about performing up to their abilities and being accountable for themselves -- publicly and privately -- when they don’t.

A manager’s quote in the media doesn’t change whether you’re playing bad baseball.