As the starters struggle...

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As the starters struggle...

So, how was your weekend?

Better than the Red Sox I hope. Then again, Im not sure how it could have been worse.

I think Joe Paternos statue had a better weekend than the Sox.

And of course, you cant talk about Bostons pathetic weekend sweep at the hands of the beat up Blue Jays without mentioning the biggest and most consistent problem currently facing this team.

Aaron Cook.

Its like, come on, man. Its pretty simple. When youre the meat in a weekend sandwich and the two pieces of bread are a pair of stale, past-their-prime, journeyman spot starters, you cant afford to be less than your best. When the team gives you a three-run lead, you cant mess around. You need to lay down the hammer. You need to rip out the hearts and hopes of the opposition and crush them like youre Bartolo Colon sitting on a grape.

Three earned runs over 6.1 innings?

What is this, AA Portland? Were you auditioning for the Spinners?

Ill tell you what, Aaron. If thats the kind of effort you plan on giving for the rest of the season, why dont you just tell us now. Because if thats the Aaron Cook we have to look forward to for the next 10 weeks, then theres nothing to look forward to at all. We might as well go pitch a tent down at Gillette and stare at the field until Training Camp starts.

Annnd . . . Ive played this joke out long enough. Too long, actually. And Im sorry, but I just didnt feel like being the 1000th writerreporteranalystfanhuman being to mention that the Red Sox are screwed unless Jon Lester and Josh Beckett wake the hell up.

At this point, we all know and understand this concept far too well. We watched it play out last September. Its been the major theme of the last three months. Still, after this weekend, the starter hysteria is at an all time high. So are the struggles.

Lester just completed what is, hands down, the worst three-start stretch of his career. Hes never pitched fewer innings (12.1) over three consecutive starts. Hes never given up more runs (21) over three consecutive starts. He now has the fourth worst ERA (5.46) of any American League starter, and the fifth worst WHIP (1.46). Hes given up more runs (79) than any pitcher in baseball.

Meanwhile, Becketts 1-4 in his last eight starts, and while some of those losses might fall into the hard luck category, the overall numbers arent deceiving. Bottom line: Becketts been bad. Maybe not as bad as Lester, but thats not saying much. Johnny Pesky would be an upgrade over No. 31.

But unfortunately, there are no upgrades on the way.

As much as everyone involved or at least the fans and the pitchers themselves might enjoy a trade and a change of scenery, its silly to get our hopes up. Lester and Beckett each have only one start before the trade deadline, and unless they pitch a pair of perfect games, it's hard to imagine a scenario in which the Sox will get enough in return. It's far more likely that we'll see them suck up it for one more season and say: "Sink or swim, this is who we are."

So, who are they? Well, as of today they're back to .500. They're back in last place. They're about to embark one of the most difficult stretches of the season with nine games in 10 days against the Rangers, Yankees and Tigers.

Who will they be? They'll only be as good as Beckett and Lester allow them to be. This isn't any grand or earth shattering statement. You can go around to almost every city in the majors and assume the same: If a team's No. 1 and 2 starters are awful, said team won't be successful. It's really that easy.

And in a way, that's comforting. For all the problems that Red Sox have had this season, between injuries and drama and poor production from players across the board, at this point, things have been simplified. The bullpen is still in good shape. The line-up is finally coming together and once David Ortiz returns, will be whole for the first time all season. After a little slump, Felix Doubront has settled down. Clay Buchholz is healthy again, has won four of his last six starts, and that doesn't include last Thursday's dominant no decision against Chicago.

Look at this team right now, what's keeping them from success? What's standing between them and baseball's upper echelon?

You know the answer. Or more, the two answers.

You know that nothing is going to change unless something changes with Josh Beckett and Jon Lester.

That is, unless Aaron Cook finally starts pulling his weight.

Rich can be reached at rlevine@comcastsportsnet.com. Follow Rich on Twitter at http:twitter.comrich_levine

Moreland, Travis homer to lead Red Sox past Northeastern 9-6 in opener

Moreland, Travis homer to lead Red Sox past Northeastern 9-6 in opener

Mitch Moreland and Sam Travis hit three-run homers and left-hander Brian Johnson started and pitched two scoreless innings to help the Red Sox win their spring training opener, 9-6, over Northeastern University on Thursday in Fort Myers, Fla.

Johnson, who made one spot start in his MLB debut with the Red Sox in 2015 but then was derailed by injuries and anxiety issues last season, struck out three and walked one Thursday. He's expected to start the season at Triple-A Pawtucket, where he went 5-6 with a 4.44 ERA in 15 starts in 2016.

Moreland, the left-handed hitting first baseman signed to a one-year deal after spending his first seven seasons with the Texas Rangers, and Travis, a right-handed hitting first base prospect coming back from knee surgery last season, each hit three-run homers in a six-run third inning.

Pablo Sandoval, attempting to reclaim the third-base job after missing nearly all of last season after surgery on his left shoulder, went 1-for-2 with a double. 

The Red Sox open Grapefruit League play Friday afternoon when they host the New York Mets at JetBlue Park. 

Pedro Martinez talks about one of the greatest games he's ever pitched

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Pedro Martinez talks about one of the greatest games he's ever pitched

CSN baseball analyst Lou Merloni sits down with Pedro Martinez and Red Sox hitting coach Chili Davis to discuss one of Pedro's greatest games. 

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On September 10, 1999 at the height of the Red Sox/Yankees rivalry, Pedro Martinez struck out 17 Yankees in a complete game victory, with the only hit he allowed being a home run to Chili Davis. The two men recall that memorable night in the Bronx, and discuss the state of pitching in 2017.