Red Sox take UConn's Barnes No. 19 overall

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Red Sox take UConn's Barnes No. 19 overall

By MaureenMullen
CSNNE.com

BOSTON -- The Red Sox stayed in their own backyard to make their first pick of the 2011 draft, selecting UConn right-handed pitcher Matt Barnes, a native of Bethel, Conn., with the 19th overall selection.

Barnes, who turns 21 on June 17, is 6-feet, 4-inches, 203 pounds with a fastball in the 91-93 range. He posted a record of 11-4 with a 1.62 ERA in 16 starts spanning 116 23 innings this season for the Huskies, who are playing Monday night in the regionals of the NCAA tournament.

Barnes last pitched Friday against Coastal Carolina, taking the loss, in the Huskies first game of the NCAA tournament at Clemson. He went 4 13 innings, giving up seven runs on nine hits and three walks with six strikeouts.

Barnes has 241 career strikeouts, just two behind UConn all-time leader Ed Baird, who set the record in 1966-68.

"You can see he hasn't quite filled out yet," UConn coach Jim Penders told the Hartford Courant last week. "Matt has got all the tools. Great body. Great arm strength. Most of all, he has got a great mentality. He has a mature approach on the mound. He has developed great command of his fastball. He can go both sides of the plate with it. It's pretty dominant. He can get it up to 98 mph. His breaking pitches have come a long way, too."

With their second pick, No. 26 overall, the Red Sox took switch-hitting high school catcher Blake Swihart out of New Mexico.

Swihart, at 6-feet, 175 pounds, turned 18 on April 3. He was ranked by Baseball American as the 17th best prospect in the draft. He has commited to the Universtiy of Texas, which could raise his price for the Red Sox.

The Red Sox took a tall (6-feet, 6-inches, 190 pounds) left-handed high school pitcher from California with their third pick, 36th overall (first in the compensation round). Henry Owens, who turns 19 on July 21 from Edison High in Southern California, has a 90-92-mph fastball. He also throws a curveball, slider, and changeup.

With their fourth and final pick on the first day of the night, the Red Sox took outfielder Jackie Bradley from the University of South Carolina. Bradley, who is 5-feet-10, 180 pounds, turned 21 on April 19. A wrist injury that required surgery slowed the left-handed hitter at the plate this season. He hit just .259 in 37 games while playing centerfield for the Gamecocks this season.

Maureen Mullen is on Twitter athttp:twitter.commaureenamullen

Young, Vazquez homer for Red Sox in 9-2 win over Twins

Young, Vazquez homer for Red Sox in 9-2 win over Twins

BOSTON - Chris Young hit a three-run homer and Christian Vazquez homered for the first time in more than a year as the Boston Red Sox routed the Minnesota Twins 9-2 on Tuesday night in a game delayed twice by stormy weather.

Drew Pomeranz (7-4) pitched five innings, three after a 1 hour, 16 minute delay between the second and third as a thunderstorm slowly passed over Fenway Park. Despite the interruption, Pomeranz held the Twins to one unearned run and four hits, struck out seven and didn't walk a batter.

Dustin Pedroia had three hits and scored twice and Xander Bogaerts had two hits and scored twice for the Red Sox as they won consecutive games for the first time in nearly two weeks.

The two rain delays totaled 2:06.

Drellich: MLB could explain umpire rulings more often

Drellich: MLB could explain umpire rulings more often

BOSTON — We know that Red Sox manager John Farrell did something wrong. In the absence of any sort of formal announcement otherwise, we’re left to assume the umpires did everything properly — but there’s room for MLB to make that clearer.

If the NBA can put out Last 2 Minute reports, why can’t MLB provide more regular explanations or reviews of contested calls?

Farrell on Tuesday said he’d like to see more public accountability in the umpiring realm, hours before the manager was to sit out Game No. 77. Farrell was suspended one game for making contact with crew chief Bill Miller on Saturday night as manager and umpire rained spittle on each other over a balk call that went against the Sox.

Well, was it a balk or not? Did Miller do anything wrong as well?

“I don’t know if there was anything levied on the other side,” Farrell said. “I don’t know that.”

But would he like such matters to always be public?

“I think there have been strides made in that way,” Farrell said. “I guess I would. I think everyone in uniform would prefer that to be made public. Whether or not that happens, I don’t know, but that would be a choice I would make.”

The league has a thorough internal review system. But it is just that: internal. Most of the time, any way.

On most every night at Fenway Park, there is someone on hand watching just the umpires and reviewing them.

MLB, to its credit, has announced suspensions for umpires in the past. The league has made public acknowledgments when calls have been made incorrectly. More of that seems viable — even if it’s an announcement to reaffirm that the call was made and handled properly, and here are the reasons why.

“I haven’t received any further determination or review of what transpired,” Farrell said. “My position, my stance, remains steadfast. I still firmly believe that time was called [before the balk call was made]. I wasn’t arguing the balk. I was arguing the timing of it. As I reiterated today to those that I spoke with, I still stand by my side of the argument. Unfortunately, there was contact made.”