Red Sox notes: Beckett injures knee

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Red Sox notes: Beckett injures knee

By Jessica Camerato
CSNNE.com Follow @JCameratoNBA
BOSTON -- With Clay Buchholz and Jon Lester already sidelined, the Red Sox watched another starting pitcher leave the mound early with an injury.

Fortunately for them, Josh Becketts only suffered a mild hyperextended left knee.

Its a little tender, Beckett said following the Red Sox 10-3 win over the Baltimore Orioles. Its not too bad though. I think its going to be fine.

Beckett (8-3, 2.27 ERA) left the game following the fifth inning (7H, 3ER, 2BB, 3SO) for precautionary reasons, Terry Francona said, after pitching on a rain-soaked mound, which he says led to the injury.

You leave the tarp on there when its raining and stuff and that dirt just soaks up all that moisture, Beckett explained. You get the top soil on there and then as the game goes on, you start digging that out and the moistures pretty stuck down in there.

Beckett does not expect this injury to affect his availability for the MLB All-Star Game next week. He suffered the same injury playing basketball when he was younger and believes he will be ready to pitch again soon.

Ive done this before, he said. It scared me when it first happened because it literally feels like bone on bone when you go too far and straightening it out is a little bit of an issue but he thinks Ill be fine in a couple days.

The Red Sox are relieved to hear the positive prognosis on Beckett, especially after another solid outing.

He threw all strikes, which was tremendous, said Francona. He slipped on the mound, he hyperextended his knee a little bit, mild, and his stability is fine. We hopefully dodged a little bit of a bullet there. We saw him do that in Spring Training a few years back and again, we got him out strictly for precautionary reasons.

Kevin Youkilis has been named to the American League All-Star Team for the third time in his career, replacing Alex Rodriguez. Since Rodriguez was voted in by the fans, Youkilis was selected by AL All-Star Manager Ron Washington in conjunction with Major League Baseball. Youkilis is batting .275 this season with 12 homeruns and 59 RBIs.

The Boston Red Sox hadnt seen much of Baltimore Orioles pitcher Zach Britton before.

Of their starters, only six had faced him in the past -- Jacoby Ellsbury and Adrian Gonzalez had three career at-bats against Britton while Dustin Pedroia, Kevin Youkilis, David Ortiz, and Jason Vartitek had two apiece.

After only one inning, it was evident Britton hadnt seen much of the Red Sox, either.

The Red Sox scored eight runs in the first off the left-handed pitcher, recording seven hits and sent 13 batters to the plate. David Ortiz hit his 19th homerun of the season during the inning and the Red Sox recorded eight runs in an inning for the first time since August 12, 2008.

That was tremendous. Those things don't happen very often, said Francona. It's a nice way to play the game. We got a bunch of hits, we extended the inning, we kept after them, and makes a long night for them. It's happened to us, it's not fun, it's a lot better when you're on the offensive side.

Said Beckett of the run support, It was great. Youve just got to remember to still pitch. You still got to remember that youve got guys playing behind you and you just cant fall in love with one thing. One of the jokes is all we need is 12 runs and airtight defense and everything else will take care everything else. That was kind of the case tonight.

Adrian Gonzalez (126 hits) passed Jose Reyes (124 hits) for the Major League lead in hits. Gonzalezs hit total at this point are the most in Red Sox history before the All-Star Break.

Clay Buchholz, onthe DL since June 17 with a lower back strain, expects to throw Sundaybefore the All-Star break.

Then well send him homebecause we dont want him throwing on his own too much withoutsupervision , said Francona. Then when we get back hopefully we canstart getting him on that throwing program and ramp him up a littlebit. Again, its all going to be according to how hefeels.

Jessica Camerato is on Twitter at http:twitter.com!JCameratoNBA

Pomeranz gives up three runs in Red Sox loss to Blue Jays

Pomeranz gives up three runs in Red Sox loss to Blue Jays

Starter Drew Pomeranz gives up three runs on five hits in four innings of work in the Red Sox' 3-2 loss to the Blue Jays on Friday.

Lou Merloni breaks down Pomeranz's start and explains why he should be in the starting rotation to begin the season.

Sox' lack of homegrown starters an understandable problem to Yanks' Cashman

Sox' lack of homegrown starters an understandable problem to Yanks' Cashman

The dearth of homegrown starting pitching for the Red Sox is talked about almost as much as every Tom Brady post on Instagram.

Red Sox fans may take some solace in knowing their team isn’t the only one dealing with this problem.

In an interview with MLB.com's Mark Feinsand, Yankees general manager Brian Cashman didn’t talk about his team’s pitching problems in context of the Red Sox. But the explanation the longtime Yanks boss offered should sound familiar. 

In the biggest of markets, time to develop properly is scarce.

“Yeah. It's a fact,” Cashman said when asked if criticism of their pitching development was fair. “I think part of the process has been certainly where we draft. Because we've had a lot of success, we've not been allowed to tank and go off the board and therefore get access to some of the high-end stuff that plays out to be impactful. Part of it is we can't get out of our own way because we don't have the patience to let guys finish off their development, because if you possess some unique ability that stands out above everybody else -- whether it was Joba Chamberlain, Ian Kennedy, now [Luis] Severino and before that [Bryan] Mitchell and Shane Greene -- we're pulling them up before their development is finished.

“Teams like Tampa Bay, for instance, they're going to wait until they have their four pitches down and their innings limits are all exceeded at the minor-league level; they're very disciplined in that approach as they finish off their starters. For us, if I'm looking at my owner and he says, ‘What's our best team we can take north?’ 

“Well, ‘We could take this guy; he's not necessarily 100 percent finished off, but we can stick him in our 'pen. He can be in the back end of our rotation, because he's better than some of the guys we already have,’ and then you cut corners, so I think that probably plays a role in it.”

Not everything is circumstantial, though -- or a deflection. 

“And sometimes we don't make the right decisions, either, when we're making draft selections and signings and stuff like that,” Cashman continued. “On top of it all, playing in New York is a lot different than playing anywhere else.”

We’ve heard that last part about Boston too, here and there.

Cashman was complimentary of his current Sox counterpart, president of baseball operations Dave Dombrowski, whose team Cashman has compared to the Golden State Warriors.

On his feelings when he first heard the Sox were getting Chris Sale:

“When that trade was consummated, that was the first thing I thought about, which was, 'Wow, look at what they've done,' ” Cashman said. “I know how it's going to play out for them. Listen, Steve Kerr does a great job managing that team -- oh, I mean John Farrell. It's a lot of talent and with talent comes pressure to perform. I think Dave Dombrowski has done everything he possibly can to provide that city with a world championship team. They've got 162 games to show it.”