Red Sox agree to a deal with Bobby Jenks

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Red Sox agree to a deal with Bobby Jenks

By Sean McAdam
CSNNE.com

After sitting out the auctions for a handful of middle and set-up relievers for the past week, deeming the price and especially the length of the contracts too steep for their tastes, the Red Sox went on the offensive Thursday, signing free agent Bobby Jenks to a two-year, 12 million deal.

The deal is contingent on Jenks passing a physical either Friday or Saturday and includes performance bonuses that could earn Jenks as much as a 1 million more each season.

Jenks, who was non-tendered by the Chicago White Sox last month, will serve as one of the Red Sox' two primary set-up men. He'll also be ready to step in if Papelbon falters in 2011 and may be his replacement in 2012 if, as it is widely expected, Papelbon leaves for free agency after next season.

The Sox had balked at the deals being handed out to the likes of Jesse Crain (three years, 12 million with the Chicago White Sox), Matt Guerrier (three years for 12 million with the Los Angeles Dodgers) and Scott Downs (three years, 15 million), all of them set in motion by the three-year, 16.5 million deal the Detroit Tigers gave Joaquin Benoit last month.

And though the Sox handed Jenks the highest average annual value (6 million) of any reliever this winter, they also got someone with proven closing experience.

Over 5 12 seasons with the White Sox, Jenks saved 173 games in 199 chances for the White Sox. As a rookie, he served as Chicago's closer during its World Series championship season of 2005, converting five of six postseason save opportunities.

In 2010, Jenks posted a career-high 4.44 ERA and had a WHIP of 1.367, also the highest of his career. But there's statistical evidence that Jenks was often the victim of bad luck, with an abnormally high batting average of balls in play at .354. Such a high number usually suggests that pitchers were merely unfortunate, with an unusually high percentage of balls finding holes.

In fact, using Fielding Independent Pitching (FIP) -- which aims to determine a more accurate ERA -- his ERA should have been a far better 2.59. And his strikeout-to-walk ratio of 3.39 was his best since 2007 and would have led all Red Sox relievers in 2010.

"I think there's a lot of upside there,'' said a major league scout who saw Jenks often in 2010. "His velocity is still there. I had him at 95 mph most of the time. His curve ball isn't the power curve it was earlier for him, but it was still plenty good enough. And I like having a guy who's closed in a set-up role. Nothing's going to bother this guy.''

Jenks missed most of September after appearing in both ends of a doubleheader on Sept. 4 -- ironcially, a sweep of the Red Sox which effectively knocked Boston from playoff contention.

He experienced some tendinitis in his right elbow in the the final weeks, though he was cleared to pitch in the final week. The White Sox, also eliminated from postseason contention, elected not to use Jenks.

There have also been concerns about Jenks' conditioning. At 6-foot-4, he was listed at 275 pounds, a figure he probably topped. But said one major league evaluator: "He's basically been overweight most of his career.''

If Jenks performs well in 2011, he'll be positioned to replace Papelbon as the Sox' closer in 2012. That would return him to his favored role, while providing the Red Sox with a relatively affordable -- to say nothing of experienced -- closer.

The Sox' bullpen now boasts Papelbon, Bard, Jenks, lefty Felix Doubront and veteran Tim Wakefield, leaving two spots open for competition in spring training.

The Sox on Thursday came to terms with Matt Albers on a one-year deal for 875,000 (non-guaranteed) and he'll be in the mix, along with lefties Andrew Miller (re-signed by the Sox Thursday after being non-tendered earlier this month), Lenny DiNardo, and Rich Hill.

The club remains in negotiations with Dan Wheeler, a Rhode Island native who's pitched in the A.L. East for Tampa Bay. Wheeler would like a two-year deal, which the Sox won't give, but may take a one-year deal to pitch closer to home.

Sean McAdam can be reached at smcadam@comcastsportsnet.com. Follow Sean on Twitter at http:twitter.comsean_mcadam

Red Sox' seven-run rally in seventh keys 9-4 win over Rangers

Red Sox' seven-run rally in seventh keys 9-4 win over Rangers

BOSTON -- Chris Sale was perfectly happy to sit back and watch the Red Sox hitters do the work this time.

Sale cruised into the fifth inning, then was rewarded in the seventh when the Boston batters erupted for seven runs on their way to a 9-4 victory over the Texas Rangers on Wednesday night.

Sale (5-2) struck out six, falling short in his attempt to become the first pitcher in baseball's modern era to strike out at least 10 batters in nine straight games in one season.

But he didn't seem to mind.

"It was fun," said the left-hander, who received more runs of support in the seventh inning alone than while he was in any other game this season. "You get run after run, hit after hit. When we score like that, it's fun."

Dustin Pedroia waved home the tiebreaking run on a wild pitch, then singled in two more as the Red Sox turned a 3-1 deficit into a five-run lead and earned their third straight victory. Sam Travis had two singles for the Red Sox in his major league debut.

"I was a little nervous in the first inning," he said. "I'd be lying to you guys if I said I wasn't."

Mike Napoli homered for Texas, which has lost three of four to follow a 10-game winning streak.

FOR SALE

Sale, who also struck out 10 or more batters in eight straight games in 2015 with the White Sox, remains tied for the season record with Pedro Martinez. (Martinez had 10 straight in a span from 1999-2000.)

After scoring four runs in support of Sale in his first six starts, the Red Sox have scored 27 while he was in the game in his last five. He took a no-hitter into the fifth, but finished with three earned runs, six hits and a walk in 7 1/3 innings.

"Guys pulled through for me when I was probably pretty mediocre," he said.

NO RELIEF

Sam Dyson (1-5) faced seven batters in relief of Martin Perez and gave up four hits, three walks - two intentional - and a wild pitch without retiring a batter.

"Martin threw the ball really well and I came in with two guys on and couldn't get an out," Dyson said. "Sometimes they hit them where they are, and sometimes they hit them where they aren't."

Asked if he felt any different, he said: "Everything's the same.

"If I get my (expletive) handed to me, it's not like anything's wrong," he said. "Any more amazing questions from you all?"

SEVEN IN THE SEVENTH

It was 3-1 until the seventh, when Andrew Benintendi and Travis singled with one out to chase Perez. Mitch Moreland singled to make it 3-2, pinch-hitter Josh Rutledge singled to tie it and, after Mookie Betts was intentionally walked to load the bases, Moreland scored on a wild pitch to give Boston the lead.

Pedroia singled in two more runs, Xander Bogaerts doubled and Hanley Ramirez was intentionally walked to load the bases. Dyson was pulled after walking Chris Young to force in another run.

Austin Bibens-Dirkx got Benintendi to pop up foul of first base, but Napoli let it fall safely - his second such error in the game. Benintendi followed with a sacrifice fly that made it 8-3 before Travis was called out on strikes to end the inning.

TRAINER'S ROOM

Rangers: 2B Rougned Odor was shaken up when he dived for Betts' grounder up the middle in the third inning. He was slow getting up. After being looked at by the trainer, he remained in the game.

Red Sox: LHP David Price made his second rehab start for Triple-A Pawtucket, allowing six runs - three earned - seven hits and a walk. He struck out four in 3 2/3 innings, throwing 89 pitches, 61 for strikes, and left without addressing reporters. 3B Pablo Sandoval also played in the game, going 2 for 4 with two runs.

"He felt fine physically," said Red Sox manager John Farrell, who added he would talk to Price on Thursday morning to determine how to proceed. "We had a scout there who liked what he saw."

UP NEXT:

Rangers: Will send RHP Nick Martinez (1-2) to the mound in the finale of the three-game series.

Red Sox: LHP Drew Pomeranz (3-3) looks to snap a personal two-game losing streak.

David Price dodges media after second rough rehab start

David Price dodges media after second rough rehab start

If only David Price could pitch as well as he dodges the media.

The Red Sox lefty bailed on a typical post-start media session with reporters in Pawtucket on Wednesday, after his second minor league rehab outing in Triple-A was another dud.

As Price comes back from a nondescript elbow injury, difficulty retiring minor league hitters doesn't combine well with difficulty facing questions. He sat in the mid-90s in his second rehab start with Pawtucket, but allowed six runs, three earned, in 3 2/3 innings. He struck out four and walked one.

The PawSox were at home at McCoy Stadium against Triple-A Louisville, a Reds affiliate, and Price heard some heckling. Postgame, he wanted to hear nothing, apparently.

Per CSNNE’s Bill Messina, who was on site in Pawtucket, the media was waiting outside the clubhouse for Price, as is standard. 

PawSox media relations told the media to go to the weight room, where Price would meet them. As media headed that way, PR alerted reporters that Price was leaving and did not want to talk. Media saw a car leaving, but there was no interview.

On the mound, Price’s velocity is there, but the command is not. The Red Sox would be unwise to bring back Price before really two more minor league starts — one to show he can do well, another to show he can repeat it.

Price’s ERA in two starts for Pawtucket is 9.53. He’s gone 5 2/3 innings and allowed six earned runs, while striking out eight and walking two overall.