Pedroia sparks Sox with an epic at-bat

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Pedroia sparks Sox with an epic at-bat

By DannyPicard
CSNNE.com

BOSTON -- @font-face font-family: "Times New Roman";p.MsoNormal, li.MsoNormal, div.MsoNormal margin: 0in 0in 0.0001pt; font-size: 12pt; font-family: "Times New Roman"; table.MsoNormalTable font-size: 10pt; font-family: "Times New Roman"; div.Section1 page: Section1; There was simply nothing else Jered Weaver could do. Slider,changeup, fastball, cutter; he just couldnt get anything by Dustin Pedroia inthe bottom of the fifth inning on Monday night at Fenway Park.

It was the type of at-bat that signified everything thefeisty second baseman is all about. Pedroia was downright ruthless.

With runners on second and third and two outs in a gamewhich the Red Sox were trailing the Los Angeles Angels, 2-1, Pedroia and Weaver battled for nearly 10 minutes in a 13-pitch at-bat that ended when the Sox second baseman ripped a fastball up themiddle, scoring Carl Crawford and Jacoby Ellsbury and giving the Red Sox a 3-2 lead.

Needless to say, it was a game-changer.

He has a way of doing that, said manager TerryFrancona of Pedroia after Bostons 9-5 win over Los Angeles on Monday night. He fights,he doesnt give in. Not just at the plate. On the bases, in the field.

He plays the game. Hes a ballplayer.

Pedroia ran up the first-base line wearing his emotions onhis sleeve. Not just because he won a hard-fought battle, but because it came against one of the best pitchers in the league. Weaver entered the game with a 6-0 record and an ERA of 0.99.

To be honest with you, man, I was just trying to put theball in play, said Pedroia. Immean, Jereds tough, man. I faced him a lot in college and my first few yearsin the big leagues, and it doesnt get any better than him.

I havent won too many of those, but it was nice to drivein a couple, and kind of get everything going.

Pedroia started the fifth inning with some clutch glove workas well, after the Angels had loaded the bases with one out.

With the game tied at 1-1, Bobby Abreu hit a ball up themiddle that changed directions as it glanced off pitcher Clay Buchholz and then off the side of the mound.Pedroia, who was racing to his right, had to stop his momentum and make an awkward cross-body stab at the ball, which was now on his left.

Pedroia somehow wasable to snare the ball and make the flip to second base for thesecond out.

The Angels scored their second run of the game on the play, taking a 2-1 lead. But if Pedroia didnt make that play, the ball would have gone into short right field, two runs would have scored, and there would have beenrunners on the corners with only one out.

The Red Sox got out of theinning trailing by one, 2-1.

I was just trying to keep it in the infield, and it hitBuchholz glove, and I was just trying to knock it down and get an out, saidPedroia after the game.

He got the out, and then carried it over to his offense inthe bottom of the fifth, changing the momentum on Monday night.

It was a phenomenal at-bat, said Red Sox catcher JasonVaritek. It gave us the lead. Hes up there battling, doing what he does, andbattling. And thats what this team is built on.

With a guy like Weaver, were all battling, saidPedroia. Its not like you look at the lineup, and see hes pitching, andeveryones lining up at the bat-rack. We know its going to be a grind. We hadsome good at-bats. He still pitched his butt off, and we were a few runsbetter.

Danny Picard is onTwitter at http:twitter.comDannyPicard.

Pedro Martinez talks about one of the greatest games he's ever pitched

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Pedro Martinez talks about one of the greatest games he's ever pitched

CSN baseball analyst Lou Merloni sits down with Pedro Martinez and Red Sox hitting coach Chili Davis to discuss one of Pedro's greatest games. 

SUBSCRIBE Audioboom | iTunes | Stitcher | Spotify

On September 10, 1999 at the height of the Red Sox/Yankees rivalry, Pedro Martinez struck out 17 Yankees in a complete game victory, with the only hit he allowed being a home run to Chili Davis. The two men recall that memorable night in the Bronx, and discuss the state of pitching in 2017.

MLB players' union agrees to pitchless intentional walks

MLB players' union agrees to pitchless intentional walks

NEW YORK - There won't be any wild pitches on intentional walks this season.

The players' association has agreed to Major League Baseball's proposal to have intentional walks without pitches this year.

"It doesn't seem like that big of a deal. I know they're trying to cut out some of the fat. I'm OK with that," Cleveland manager Terry Francona said.

While the union has resisted many of MLB's proposed innovations, such as raising the bottom of the strike zone, installing pitch clocks and limiting trips to the mound, players are willing to accept the intentional walk change.

"As part of a broader discussion with other moving pieces, the answer is yes," union head Tony Clark wrote Wednesday in an email to The Associated Press. "There are details, as part of that discussion, that are still being worked through, however."

The union's decision was first reported by ESPN .

"I'm OK with it. You signal. I don't think that's a big deal," Yankees manager Joe Girardi said. "For the most part, it's not changing the strategy, it's just kind of speeding things up. I'm good with it."

There were 932 intentional walks last year, including 600 in the National League, where batters are walked to bring the pitcher's slot to the plate.

"You don't want to get your pitcher out of a rhythm, and when you do the intentional walk, I think you can take a pitcher out of his rhythm," Girardi said. "I've often wondered why you don't bring in your shortstop and the pitcher stand at short. Let the shortstop walk him. They're used to playing catch more like that than a pitcher is."

Agreement with the union is required for playing rules changes unless MLB gives one year advance notice, in which case it can unilaterally make alterations. Baseball Commissioner Rob Manfred expressed hope Tuesday that ongoing talks would lead to an agreement on other changes but also said clubs would reserve the right to act unilaterally, consistent with the rule-change provision of the sport's labor contract.

Some changes with video review can be made unilaterally, such as shortening the time to make a challenge.

"I know they were thinking about putting in a 30-second (limit) for managers to make a decision," Francona said. "I actually wish they would. I think it would hustle it up and if we can't tell in 30 seconds, maybe we shouldn't be doing it anyway."