Notes: Pimentel tosses two scoreless innings

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Notes: Pimentel tosses two scoreless innings

By SeanMcAdam and MaureenMullen
CSNNE.com

FORT MYERS, Fla. -- In the seven-inning afternoon game against Boston College, Stolmy Pimentel tossed two scoreless innings with two strikeouts on 13 pitches.

In addition to the three-run homer from Youkilis, the Sox got a run-scoring single from Ryan Kalish and sacrifice flies from Lars Anderson and Alex Hassan.

The game also featured an annual rite of spring: a plate appearance by staff member Ino Guerrero. Guerrero made a pinch-hit appearance in the sixth and drew a walk.

During Guerrero's at-bat, every player and coach in the home dugout was on the first step, watching intently.

"He's the first player now to get into a game in nine decades,'' cracked Francona. "We wanted him to swing, believe me. There was a lot of money riding on the fact that he was not going to get a hit.''

Dennys Reyes, who signed a deal with the Red Sox earlier this month, finally arrived in camp, delayed somewhat by visa issues in his native Mexico.

"He's had two or three long days trying to travel and obstacles in getting here,'' said Francona. "We'll just try and gauge where he is. He looks good. He tested his shoulder and that came out fine. We haven't even watched him throw yet. We'll see. Obviously, the sooner the better. But we don't want to do it too soon, because that doesn't help anybody. As soon as he gets ready, and not before, we'll throw him right into the mix.''

Said Reyes: "I've been pitching for a long time and I know what to do. I'm going to do my best every time out.''

Reyes said the battle for the final two spots in the bullpen will result in "a great competition. There's nothing you can do. I know most of the guys competing and I respect them. It's not going to be our decision; it's going to be the (team's) decision and you just have to do the best you can.''

Reyes has been in a spring training competition a few times before and the toughest part of the process is the mental aspect.

"Thinking about what if you're not (chosen for the roster),'' said Reyes, "that's the hardest part.''

Though he was held up in arriving in camp, Reyes has already thrown three bullpens and three simulated games in his native Mexico.''

A mechanical flaw resulted in Reyes being ineffective against lefties last year, but he thinks he corrected it at the end of last season.

"Throughout his career,'' said Francona, "he's gotten lefties out. That's what the hopes are.''

Felix Doubront, who was shut down last week with tenderness in his left elbow, said he felt "the normal tightness'' he usually feels at the start of spring training.

Doubront had an MRI, which showed no structural damage to the elbow.

"I feel it every year when I start throwing,'' he said. "When I threw my first live BP, there was something there. It wasn't right. I talked to the trainers. It's a little frustrating, but it could have been worse. It's nothing to worry about it. It's just minor.''

The Red Sox beat Northeastern in the nightcap, 13-2, after beating Boston College in the first game, 6-0. Northeastern had more errors, seven, than the Red Sox had hits, six. Milton, Mass., Rich Hill earned the win, going one inning giving up a run on hit with one strikeout.

Mike Cameron, who was limited to 48 games last season with a lower abdominal strain, served as the designated hitter against Northeastern, going 0-for-2. It was his first game activity since July 30, with season-ending surgery on Aug. 27.

It was good, Cameron said. You just never know how the game is going to transpire. It was good. I got a chance to get out there and get in the box. The jitters kind of went away. I dont know if it was the guy who was throwing or what, but I felt kind of comfortable out there. Well continue the work in progress.

Manager Terry Francona said the original plan had been for the infield to play in the first game of the doubleheader against Boston College, and the outfield play against Northeastern. But that was scuttled when left fielder Carl Crawford was excused from camp to return to his Houston home for personal reasons. Still, Francona was happy to see Ellsbury and Cameron return to the lineup healthy.

It was nice to see them both in action, he said.

Northeasterns Ryan Maguire, of Arlington, Mass., opened the game with a first-pitch home run off Kyle Weiland. In 128 13 innings over 25 starts for Double-A Portland last season, Weiland allowed just 13 home runs.

Flashy shortstop prospect Jose Iglesias with 2-for-3 with two runs scored and three RBI.

He took a nice swing, Francona said. The big thing for Jose will be not his swing. I think hes got a pretty swing. Its just swinging at strikes, trying to work counts, and learning that aspect of it because he can hit. He can get the barrel on the ball.

Peter Hissey and Che-Hsuan Lin also had two RBI each.

Adrian Gonzalez took 25 swings off the tee, then hit 25 flips early Saturday morning. "He had a real good morning. Everything went really well. He was really pleased with us . . . Among the players scheduled to play against Minnesota in the Grapefruit League opener tonight: Jarrod Saltalmacchia; Jed Lowrie; David Ortiz; Kevin Youkilis; Mike Cameron; Darnell McDonald; Jose Iglesias; and Ryan Kalish . . . Infielder Hector Luna scratched from the second game with a tight groin, which he has battled all spring...Francona said Saltalamacchia and Jason Varitek would alternate the catching duties over the first four Grapefruit League games. Four Red Sox pitchers threw an inning each in a simulated game on the back field: Jon Lester, John Lackey, Alfredo Aceves and Bobby Jenks. After Brent Dlugach drilled a pitch from Jenks off the wall, he got the next pitch in his backside . . . Francona explaining his decision to announce that Marco Scutaro would be his starting shortstop at the start of the season: "If I was a player and went through what Scutaro did (playing hurt last year) and then had to come to camp and base my playing time on 40 at-bats, I wouldn't want to play for a guy like me. I don't think that makes a lot of sense.''

Sean McAdam can be reached at smcadam@comcastsportsnet.com.Follow Sean on Twitter at http:twitter.comsean_mcadam

Maureen Mullen is on Twitter athttp:twitter.commaureenamullen

Cardinals pull away late for 7-2 victory over Red Sox

Cardinals pull away late for 7-2 victory over Red Sox

The Cardinals broke open a close game with four runs in the last two innings against Red Sox relief prospect Chandler Shepherd and went on to a 7-2 exhibition victory over Boston yesterday at JetBlue Park in Fort Myers.

Red Sox-Cardinals box score

The loss dropped the Sox to 1-3 for the exhibition season.

Boston had jumped on top, 1-0, on an RBI single by Mitch Moreland in the bottom of the first, but St. Louis countered with two runs in the second and one in the third, all against starter Brian Johnson. It remained 3-1 until the Cards touched Shepherd for two runs in the eighth and two in the ninth. The Red Sox added their final run in the bottom of the ninth when catcher Jordan Procyshen, who spent last season at Single-A Salem, hit a sacrifice fly.

Moreland, Xander Bogaerts and Chris Young each had two hits for the Red Sox. who also got scoreless relief from Teddy Stankiewicz, Noe Ramirez, Robby Scott, Kyle Martin and Brandon Workman. It was Bogaerts' last game before leaving to compete for The Netherlands in the World Baseball Classic.

The Sox host the Yankees on Tuesday at 1:05 p.m.

Dustin Pedroia taking cues from Tom Brady to extend his career

Dustin Pedroia taking cues from Tom Brady to extend his career

Dustin Pedroia is no stranger to injuries. That's a big reason why he's no longer a stranger to the sometimes peculiar practices of New England Patriots quarterback Tom Brady.

In an interview on WEEI's "Bradfo Show," Pedroia told Rob Bradford that he's been taking cues from the five-time Super Bowl-winning QB to help extend his playing career and make his body healthier and more durable.

“I understand what he does and know what he does. I think it’s awesome,” Pedroia told Bradford. “There’s a reason why he’s successful at his age (39), and he looks better now than he did when he first came to the league. You have to be smarter as you get older and learn different styles -- the way to train and the way you take care of your body to be able to perform and stay on the field. It doesn’t matter what sport you’re playing. He’s definitely got that figured out.”

Pedroia, of course, played the entire 2013 World Series-winning season with a torn ligament in his thumb. He's battled through various other lower body and hand injuries over the past few seasons, as well. But in 2016, he had his best season in recent memory, posting his highest OPS since 2011, as WEEI notes.

Part of that is with his own take on the Brady approach -- which focuses more on pliability and resistance training than extensive, heavy weight lifting -- and a healthier overall lifestyle, something Brady is notoriously infamous for having.

"There’s tons of ways to take care of your body. It’s not just get in the weight room and throw weights around,” Pedroia explained. “As you get older, the human body can’t take the pounding if you’re going in there and power lifting. When you’re younger, you can handle some of that. But as you get older, you got to be smarter. Sometimes less is more -- whether that’s weight or reps or whatever. You’ve just got to be smart. And eating wise, that’s a big part of recovery. If you put the right foods in your body, you’ll heal faster if you’re injured or recover faster. It’s like a car, man. Put bad gas in, bro. It’s not going to be the same as good gas.”

He hopes the approach can, at the very least, keep him moving for quite some time.

“I plan on living until I’m 100," he said. "So we’re not even halfway home."