McAdam: Youk leaves a winning legacy

801108.jpg

McAdam: Youk leaves a winning legacy

BOSTON -- Kevin Youkilis spent 9 12 years in Boston, and Sean McAdam says the legacy he leaves is a strong one.

"I think in the big picture, when Red Sox fans step back and everyone looks at Kevin Youkilis' career in Boston, they will remember -- as general manager Ben Cherington mentioned, the very first thing -- a lot of winning went on when Kevin Youkilis was in a Red Sox uniform," CSNNE.com's Red Sox Insider told Jessica Moran Sunday night on 'SportsNet Central'.

"He also was a guy that through -- as Cherington referenced -- sheer hard work and will, took himself from a good player into an All-Star player . . .

"And let's not forget that . . . he came here as a third baseman, then moved to first and then moved back to third, and was able to play both positions pretty well.

"In the last year or so, he lost some range and flexibility in the field. But he was a guy -- as Oakland A's general manager Billy Beane termed long ago in 'Moneyball', 'the Greek God of walks,' -- who got on base a lot, he became a run producer, and he became a very good defender at both positions, first and third."

Paxton, Seager pace Mariners past Red Sox, 4-0

ap_17206164532475.jpg

Paxton, Seager pace Mariners past Red Sox, 4-0

James Paxton allowed four singles over seven innings to win his fifth consecutive start in July and Kyle Seager homered to pace the Seattle Mariners to a 4-0 victory over the Boston Red Sox on Monday night.

Paxton (10-3) retired the first 13 hitters before Jackie Bradley Jr.'s single to center with one out in the fifth. The left-hander, who worked out of trouble in the sixth and seventh innings, struck out 10 and walked none. Paxton has allowed six earned runs in 33 1/3 innings and not given up a home run in five starts this month.

Nick Vincent and David Phelps each pitched a perfect inning to finish.

Eduardo Rodriguez (4-3) allowed four runs on six hits in 5 1/3 innings. He struck out six and walked two in his second start since coming off the disabled list.

Hayes' handling of Felger makes Price look even worse

Hayes' handling of Felger makes Price look even worse

Jimmy Hayes and David Price both had the opportunity to confront media members recently. The guy with nothing to lose somehow handled it significantly better than the highly paid superstar. 

According to Michael Felger, Hayes, fresh off being bought out of his Bruins contract this summer, approached him in Nantucket over the weekend, handed him a beer and then lit into him, as the Dorchester native was what Felger called “really unhappy” with Felger and Mazz for some shots he felt were too personal. 

MORE RED SOX:

 
Now, we shouldn’t need to get into how Hayes should feel about the local media vs. how Price should feel, but here’s a reminder of each’s situation: Hayes is a local kid who was billed as something he wasn’t. No one expected things to go as poorly as they did, but they did and it was ugly. 

Price, on the other hand, was a highly touted free agent signing who had a good first year in Boston and, after injury delayed the start of his 2017, has been good on the field and pissy as hell off it. He’s yelled at two media members in the name of being a good teammate, most recently when he went after Dennis Eckersley on the team plane. 

Worst-case scenario, Hayes’ days an NHL regular could be over. Price remains in the midst of a prolific career and is making $30 million this season. There’s no question of who’s had it worse. 

So when you see how each handled the situation -- and even consider that alcohol was involved in what was the more civil case -- Price’s treatment of Eckersley (according to Dan Shaughnessy’s report) looks even worse. 

With the media, Hayes is polite, yet soft-spoken. In the setting in which he found himself with one of his biggest critics, he didn’t need to be. He could have tried to embarrass Felger, as Price did by mocking Eckerlsey in front of an airplane full of people. 

Instead, Hayes gave Felger a piece of his mind and the two moved on. Hayes doesn’t need to worry about Felger given that he’s not playing here anymore, but he got to make Felger answer for any perceived low blows. 

Felger was more critical of Hayes than Eckersley is of the Red Sox. In fact, Paula Abdul was often more critical of Idol contestants than Eckersley is of the Red Sox. That the players apparently hate him is perplexing, as they’re the only ones who think he comes off as malicious. 

Confrontations between players and media members certainly happen throughout the course of a season, though they typically follow a more standard format: Player says something to reporter because he doesn’t like their story or question, uncomfortable exchange takes place and, often times, apologies are given when cooler heads have prevailed. 

Yet there’s been no apology to Eckersley from Price, and there’s little reason to believe cooler heads will prevail as it relates to Price’s attitude toward the media. Hayes’ handling of his confrontation said something about his character; Price’s confrontations are only serving to build a unnecessarily negative reputation.