Boston Red Sox

McAdam: One writer's Hall of Fame criteria

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McAdam: One writer's Hall of Fame criteria

It's become fashionable in some BBWAA circles to lament the fact that voters for the Hall of Fame are limited to 10 players on the ballot annually.

If these voters had their way, Cooperstown would be building an annex every few years to accommodate all the immortals judged worthy of entrance.

Sorry, but I find such a stance laughable. The notion that more than 10 players on the current ballot are deserving of recognition as all-time greats, among the best to ever play the game, is beyond my comprehension.

Of course, everyone is entitled to their own opinion. That's both the beauty and the curse, I suppose, of surveying more than 500 eligible voters each December.

When it comes to voting for the Hall, I tend to fall on the other end of the spectrum. In more than a dozen years of voting, only once did I vote for more than three players in any one year. (That was in 1999 when I voted for Nolan Ryan, Robin Yount, George Brett and Carlton Fisk).

In other words, I am considered a "small Hall'' voter, as opposed to some of my colleagues who would be classified as "large Hall'' voters. My approach isn't meant to be punitive in any way. I merely believe the standards for Cooperstown should be set -- and remain -- very high. Others are more inclusive. Viva la difference.

Most years, I have voted for, on average, two players. Once, I returned a blank ballot (1998) and nearly did so again this time before I had a change of heart.

Among the newcomers -- led by Bernie Williams -- there was no one I gave any strong consideration. And given the fact that, a year ago, I voted only for Roberto Alomar, there were no holdovers for whom I felt compelled to vote.

Upon further review, however, I changed that.

After giving some consideration to voting for Jeff Bagwell in his first year of eligibility, I ultimately passed on him. Bagwell has been suspected of PED use and that was enough for me to exclude him from my ballot.

But the more I thought about it, the more that decision seemed wrong. After all, Bagwell was not mentioned in the Mitchell Report. He wasn't implicated by our great moral arbiter, Jose Canseco. He has no links to other notorious steroid-era figures such as Kurt Radomski or Brian McNamara. And he didn't lie to Congress or a grand jury.

The case against Bagwell, such as it is, is that he hit four homers at Double A, then "blossomed'' into a slugger when he reached the major leagues.

But there's no evidence whatsoever that Bagwell ever used PEDs. Baseball history is full of players who, for a variety of reasons, perform far better at the major leagues than they did in the minors.

Taken on his numbers alone, Bagwell is very much a worthy Cooperstown candidate.

In 15 full seasons, he hit 449 home runs, or precisely one shy of avergaging exactly 30 homers for his career. He sported a career .408 on-base percentage and a career slugging percentage of .540 for an OPS of .948.

He had double-figures in steals 10 times and scored 100 or more runs nine times, including a staggering 152 runs in 2000, the most for a player since 1936. In fact, he's one of just 22 players since World War II to accumulate both 1,500 runs scored and 1,500 RBI in his career.

Bagwell was also a terrific defender, regularly among the league leaders for assists and putouts at his position.

In short, Bagwell's numbers unequivocally make him a Hall of Famer. The lone black mark -- if you can call it that -- is his rumored involvement with PEDs, though there's not a shred of hard, actual evidence to support that.

Here are the rest of the most talked-about candidates and my reason(s) for not giving them my vote:

JACK MORRIS: Morris was a horse and a terrific big game pitcher (think no further than Game 7 in 1991). But his 3.90 ERA, compiled almost entirely before the steroid era, would be the highest of any starter in the Hall. Clutch? Yes. Dependable? You bet. But all-time great? I don't think so.

BARRY LARKIN: Of all the players I didn't vote for on this ballot, Larkin represented the toughest omission. He hit .295 for his career, which is quite good for a shortstop. But --- and this is where it gets tough to quantify -- I view Larkin as a very good player, but one who nonetheless falls shy of Hall of Fame status. At no time during his career did I consider Larkin one of the very best players in the game.

ALAN TRAMMELL: Like Larkin, he spent his entire career with one team and like Larkin, was incredibly consistent. But in 20 seasons, he finished in the Top 10 for MVP voting just three times and in the Top 5 just once. To me, that's a few great seasons and a lot of good-to-very-good ones, leaving him shy of all-time status.

TIM RAINES: For a period -- say, from 1982-1987 -- Raines was a spectacular player, a leadoff hitter whose talent and numbers compare favorably with Rickey Henderson. But for a player who was supposed to be such a terrific table-setter and baserunner, Raines scored more than 81 runs exactly twice in his final 14 seasons. Sorry, but his period of dominance was way too short for me.

Drellich: Red Sox role-d once again by Farrell's bullpen usage

Drellich: Red Sox role-d once again by Farrell's bullpen usage

CLEVELAND -- John Farrell is fighting himself. More than he might realize, he’s willing to mix up his bullpen usage in a way that’s smart. But in some of the most crucial innings, Farrell will stubbornly and perhaps reflexively revert to tradition and a false sense of role -- one that actually runs counter to the logic the manager employs at other times.

Look at the big cat, Craig Kimbrel, who was again left in the bullpen Monday night as the eighth and ninth innings deteriorated in a 5-4 Red Sox loss to the Indians. 

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It’s all about the inning with Kimbrel, you see -- or in Monday’s case, it's a matter of when Farrell would have been forced to use him.

“[If] I use Kimbrel tonight, [he'll] need . . . one, if not two days off,” Farrell said. “That's why you need the contributions from everyone.”

But the indication was Kimbrel was available for a save, or perhaps the 10th inning when the lineup turned over again. If he needs rest, rest him. Farrell did not say that Kimbrel was down entirely.

But the eighth inning? No, that’d be lunacy.

“I know that there’s this overriding thought that you can just drop Craig Kimbrel in anywhere from the sixth inning to the ninth inning,” Farrell said Friday. “And with all due respect, there’s a lot more that goes into it than just that. We’ve used Craig for four outs or more this year. And there’s a willingness to do that. 

“But when we’re completely rested down there, there are roles [in which] guys have performed very well . . . And there’s a reason why our bullpen has excelled to the point they have. There are roles that are established and they pitch to them.”

Seriously, what roles? The roles change as often as Farrell’s logic defending them, aside from Kimbrel’s overwhelming need to be in save situations.

The Sox were not “completely rested” on Monday, for one. Addison Reed was unavailable entirely.

But step back for a moment, and look at the overall usage of the reliever who initially got the Red Sox into trouble Monday in the eighth, Matt Barnes. 

The righty this year has pitched in the sixth inning three times. He’s been used in the seventh inning 18 times and the eighth inning 29 times, including Monday. 

Another nine times, Barnes has pitched in the ninth or later. Fourteen times, he’s made multi-inning appearances.

Does that sound like a rigid role to you?

When Farrell spoke recently of his plan for using Reed and Barnes, it sounded pretty darn progressive.

"Addision, we’ve initially said it’s the eighth inning," Farrell said. "We’ve used him accordingly based on where we are in the lineup and based on the potential of running threats . . . As we map out the seventh and eighth inning, it’s going to be Barnes and Addison and we’ll see where the right matchups provide themselves.”

So what matters more, lineup position and running threats, or what inning it is?

Depends which reliever Farrell is talking about on which night, or maybe which way the wind is blowing.

For Monday night, Barnes all of a sudden was a reliever with a role.

“On a night when not everyone's available, [Barnes is] the one that has had the most experience in the eighth inning against both lefties and righties,” Farrell said.

Experience in a particular inning, now that’s the primary factor for Barnes? What about the fact Barnes has been terrible on the road lately?

What about the fact that Brandon Workman has a 1.40 ERA, or that Farrell said before the game Workman is now in the high-leverage mix?

Workman gave up a leadoff double on Monday in the ninth inning. He might have blown the eighth inning anyway. Farrell also prefers a clean inning for Workman, and wanted to avoid using the righty Monday for workload reasons as well.

But Workman was, indeed, available. So why let extra innings or a tie game in the ninth force you to use him, as opposed to pitching him at a time he perhaps could have protected the lead?

Workman in the eighth could have thrown in place of either Barnes or Heath Hembree. The latter’s done worse than anyone on the Sox with inherited runners and came on to try to clean up Barnes’ mess. Workman has six inherited runners this year and none have scored.

But Workman has a role. Except he doesn’t. Or if he does, it’s as loosely defined as everybody else’s, save for the guy who can only get saves.

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Guyer scores winner on Holt's error in 9th, Indians top Red Sox, 5-4

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Guyer scores winner on Holt's error in 9th, Indians top Red Sox, 5-4

CLEVELAND -- Andrew Miller wasn't among the Cleveland Indians chasing Roberto Perez around the infield, flinging water and white powder to celebrate a wild win over an American League rival.

The Indians relief ace - a pivotal piece during Cleveland's run to the World Series last season - may miss a few more big moments this season, too.

Miller's injury put a damper on a 5-4 walk-off victory Monday night over the Boston Red Sox, a game that ended when first baseman Brock Holt threw away Perez's bunt in the ninth inning, allowing Brandon Guyer to score from second base.

Miller left in the seventh after aggravating the patellar tendinitis in his right knee. Miller spent over two weeks on the disabled list with the injury before returning Friday. This was his second appearance since.

Manager Terry Francona said Miller will be evaluated Tuesday, but it seems likely that he'll return to the DL.

"Hope for the best and hope that it's not a big deal," Miller said. "It stinks missing any time. I've already missed 12 days or something like that. I don't want to do it again. We'll find out more (Tuesday). See how I wake up."

"That's not what we were hoping for, but we'll let the medical people put their heads together and see what they can do," Francona said.

Miller began the seventh by walking Red Sox star Mookie Betts on six pitches - including a number of fastballs that failed to reach 90 mph - and then threw one pitch to Andrew Benintendi before walking off the mound. Francona and a team trainer had a brief conversation with Miller, who then left the field.

Miller said he was optimistic that he had turned the corner with the injury, but that changed when he entered the game.

"It was kind of not really crisp the first pitches," he said. "But the pitch I pulled inside to Mookie, I kind of felt it. And I threw one more and it was the same thing."

The left-hander is 4-3 with a 1.65 ERA and has 79 strikeouts in 54 2/3 innings.

After Guyer's leadoff double against Brandon Workman (0-1) in the ninth, Holt fielded the bunted ball and tried to throw out Guyer at third. Guyer slid into the bag as the throw skipped past third baseman Rafael Devers, then got to his feet and raced across home plate.

"It was just a routine play," Holt said. "I couldn't get it out of the glove, fumbled it a little bit, and then tried to rush the throw, and made a bad one."

Holt replaced Mitch Moreland, who was a late scratch because of a sore neck. Moreland took a forearm in the back of the head from Holt on a play Sunday. Manager John Farrell said Moreland passed concussion tests, but he decided to hold him out of the lineup.

Perez also had a three-run homer in the second inning.

Cody Allen (1-6) allowed Christian Vazquez's leadoff single in the ninth, but retired the next three hitters. The inning ended when shortstop Francisco Lindor ran down Betts' popup in center field with his back to home plate.

Boston led 4-3 behind two-run homers by Hanley Ramirez and Andrew Benintendi before Edwin Encarnacion tied the game in the eighth with an RBI single.

Eduardo Rodriguez allowed three runs in 5 2/3 innings for Boston. Mike Clevinger allowed both homers and gave up four runs in 4 1/3 innings for Cleveland.

Jay Bruce was 1 for 4 in his first home game since being acquired from the New York Mets on Aug. 9.

MORE NOTABLE INJURIES

Plate umpire Hunter Wendelstedt was struck on the mask by a warmup pitch in the sixth inning from Red Sox reliever Joe Kelly. Wendelstedt finished the inning, but left while Miller was warming up, which led to a 10-minute delay as second base umpire Alan Porter changed his gear.

Indians first baseman Carlos Santana also left the game with an injury, exiting in the eighth inning with lower back tightness.

TRAINER'S ROOM

Red Sox: LHP Drew Pomeranz (back spasms) says he's on schedule to start Wednesday after a bullpen session Monday. He left his start against the Yankees on Friday in the fourth inning. "I feel pretty good," he said. "The progression is a little better every day, so I'm looking to keep getting that improvement."

Indians: OF Michael Brantley (sprained right ankle) is hitting and playing catch but hasn't started running. He's on the disabled list for the second time this season with the injury.

UP NEXT

RHP Doug Fister will face Cleveland for the third time in his last four starts Tuesday. He defeated the Indians on July 31, allowing two runs in 7 2/3 innings, but gave up five runs in 4 1/3 innings and got the loss Aug. 14. RHP Carlos Carrasco didn't make it out of the second inning against Boston on Aug. 2, allowing five runs.