Boston Red Sox

Matsuzaka confirms surgery

191542.jpg

Matsuzaka confirms surgery

By Sean McAdam
CSNNE.com

BOSTON -- Pitcher Daisuke Matsuzaka officially confirmed his plans to undergo Tommy John surgery, but was still unclear as to when the procedure will be performed.

"It's to be decided -- we'll find it out on Monday," Matsuzaka said. "We'll find out everything on Monday. It's actually my first time to get an operation and all I can say is I'm very shocked when it comes to these results."

Although Matsuzaka told Nippon Sports that he was having the surgery more than 10 days ago, he insisted Sunday: "I decided to have the surgery the same day the team officially announced Friday."

Recovery time from Tommy John surgery can be anywhere from a year to 18 months, raising the possibility that he has pitched his last inning in a Red Sox uniform.

"It's difficult to say at this point," Matsuzaka said. "But, you know, what I can do is do my best and come back to the game as soon as I can. All I have right now is anxiety, so all I can do is do what I have to do my best, and come back to the game."

The Red Sox had hoped that Matsuzaka would try rest and rehab rather than undergo surgery immediately, but the pitcher maintained that having the operation was his only option.

"The ligament is torn,'' he said, "and I was told to fix it perfectly, I need to have the surgery. That's why I'm getting the surgery."

If, as seems likely, Matsuzaka's career with the Red Sox is over, he was asked if it was time to put his Red Sox career into perspective.

"I don't think of it that way," he said. "For sure, I hope I come back to the game again with the Red Sox uniform. If I wouldn't come back to the game, I will have to talk about that next time."

Sean McAdam can be reached at smcadam@comcastsportsnet.com. Follow Sean on Twitter at http:twitter.comsean_mcadam

MLB umpires end protest, will meet with Manfred

umpires-protest-wrist-band-wristband-082117.jpg

MLB umpires end protest, will meet with Manfred

NEW YORK -- Major League Baseball umpires have ended their protest of what they called "abusive player behavior" after Commissioner Rob Manfred offered to meet with their union's governing board.

Most umpires wore white wristbands during Saturday's games after Detroit second baseman Ian Kinsler was fined but not suspended for his recent verbal tirade against ump Angel Hernandez. Kinsler said Tuesday that Hernandez was a bad umpire and "just needs to go away."

The World Umpires Association announced Sunday in a series of tweets that Manfred had proposed a meeting to discuss its concerns.

"To demonstrate our good faith, MLB Umpires will remove the protest white wrist bands pending the requested meeting," the organization posted on Twitter.

Kinsler was ejected by Hernandez last Monday in Texas after being called out on strikes. The next day, Kinsler sharply criticized Hernandez, saying the umpire was "messing" with games "blatantly."

"No, I'm surprised at how bad an umpire he is. ... I don't know how, for as many years he's been in the league, that he can be that bad. He needs to re-evaluate his career choice, he really does. Bottom line," Kinsler said.

Kinsler was fined, but the umpires' union felt he should have been suspended.

"The Office of the Commissioner's lenient treatment to abusive player behavior sends the wrong message to players and managers. It's `open season' on umpires, and that's bad for the game," the WUA said in a release on Saturday.