Boston Red Sox

Hill ready to rejoin Red Sox in improbable return to Majors

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Hill ready to rejoin Red Sox in improbable return to Majors

BOSTON - As recently as two months ago, Rich Hill was trying to stay in shape by throwing with an American Legion team in his native Milton, Mass.

Only a month ago, he was pitching for the Long Island Ducks in an unaffiliated independent league.

And sometime in the next week, Hill will start a game for the Red Sox, constituting his third stint with the franchise.

Improbable? That doesn't begin to cover it.

"I would say it's probably very (improbable),'' Hill admitted with a chuckle. "It was surprising in the beginning, but I guess, not now... It's great. If you keep working, that's really the whole thing.''

Hill is a 10-year veteran of the major leagues, having pitched for six different organizations as both a starter and reliever.

He began the year pitching in the bullpen for Washington's Triple A affiliate in Syracuse before being released.

Following some time at home, he focused on going somewhere where he could resume his role as a starter, something he hadn't done in five years.

"It's been kind of something that I've been thinking about the last couple of years,'' said Hill. "When you have a good thing going as a (lefty) specialist, you stick with that. If it's not broken....you know. That's kind of the approach I was taking out of the bullpen.

"But I've always had the feeling that I wanted to get back into starting. I enjoyed it so much. I enjoy the process, the days in-between working up to the start and being able to use all your pitches and go through a lineup, hopefully, three or four times. To be able to use all your weapons is something that was always exciting to me.''

Long Island gave him that opportunity. He made two starts there, striking out 14 in six innings and catching the eye of several scouts.

His preference was to pitch for the Red Sox again -- something he had done, on and off, from 2010 through 2012 -- and with Pawtucket suddenly short of starters thanks to major league callups (Eduardo Rodriguez, Joe Kelly, Henry Owens) and injuries (Brian Johnson) there was an opening for Hill.

He made five starts at Triple A, and with the Sox looking for someone to act as a sixth starter to ease the workload for Owens and Rodriguez, Hill was in the right spot, right time.

The Sox haven't announced exactly when he'll slot in to the rotation, but it seems assured that when the team starts its upcoming road trip Friday after a day off in the schedule Thursday, Hill will be part of a newly expanded rotation.

"It's been great,'' he said of the experience. "As far as I know, I feel maybe I've been somewhere between 90-94 mph. Overall, it's been (about) command, commanding the ball down in the zone and being able to throw all four pitches for strikes. That's been the big thing to me.''

Hill has had his share of injuries. He had major shoulder in 2008 while pitching for the Cubs and and Tommy John surgery several years later with the Red Sox.

Healthy again, he's regained velocity and gone back to his original delivery after experimenting with a sidearm delivery while pitching in relief.

"I'm more of a conventional, over-the-top slot (pitcher),'' said Hill. "It just feels comfortable, working over the rubber, finishing out in front. Things that I can feel. I'm gathering myself and exploding out front and really feel like I'm behind the ball.

"This was my opportunity (to start again so I said to myself) 'Go ahead and take it.' It's pretty neat.''

Pomeranz, Price, Pedroia make health progress

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Pomeranz, Price, Pedroia make health progress

CLEVELAND — There was positive news for a trio of injured Red Sox players on Monday, including Wednesday’s scheduled starter, Drew Pomeranz. 

The lefty threw a side session at Progressive Field before the Red Sox began a four-game series with the Indians and came out of it feeling well. He’s on track to make his next start after his last one was cut short because of lower back spasms.

Back in Boston, meanwhile, Dustin Pedroia and David Price both took steps forward. Price threw from flat ground out to about 60 feet, manager John Farrell said, while Pedroia did agility drills.

“He went through some functional work, some change of direction, some lateral work,” Farrell said of Pedroia. “He did run on the altered-G treadmill which reduces some of the normal body weight. So it was a productive day for him.”

Mitch Moreland was initially in Monday’s lineup but was scratched for Brock Holt. Moreland went through concussion testing and passed after an awkward play at first base in the eighth inning yesterday, when Brock Holt made an excellent diving play in the hole. Holt threw on to Moreland at first base and Moreland stretched awkwardly into the base line of an oncoming Brett Gardner. 

“He was a little bit out of position there on the collision with Gardner,” Farrell said. “He took a forearm to the back, to the neck, the back of the head. He went through the whole concussion protocol. He passed that. He’s sore. Was able to get on a treadmill and run for 10-12 minutes. He passed all those tests but felt like with the recommendations from our medical staff we would give him a day to get over it. 

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MLB umpires end protest, will meet with Manfred

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MLB umpires end protest, will meet with Manfred

NEW YORK -- Major League Baseball umpires have ended their protest of what they called "abusive player behavior" after Commissioner Rob Manfred offered to meet with their union's governing board.

Most umpires wore white wristbands during Saturday's games after Detroit second baseman Ian Kinsler was fined but not suspended for his recent verbal tirade against ump Angel Hernandez. Kinsler said Tuesday that Hernandez was a bad umpire and "just needs to go away."

The World Umpires Association announced Sunday in a series of tweets that Manfred had proposed a meeting to discuss its concerns.

"To demonstrate our good faith, MLB Umpires will remove the protest white wrist bands pending the requested meeting," the organization posted on Twitter.

Kinsler was ejected by Hernandez last Monday in Texas after being called out on strikes. The next day, Kinsler sharply criticized Hernandez, saying the umpire was "messing" with games "blatantly."

"No, I'm surprised at how bad an umpire he is. ... I don't know how, for as many years he's been in the league, that he can be that bad. He needs to re-evaluate his career choice, he really does. Bottom line," Kinsler said.

Kinsler was fined, but the umpires' union felt he should have been suspended.

"The Office of the Commissioner's lenient treatment to abusive player behavior sends the wrong message to players and managers. It's `open season' on umpires, and that's bad for the game," the WUA said in a release on Saturday.