Ellsbury 'comfortable' with Red Sox

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Ellsbury 'comfortable' with Red Sox

ANAHEIM -- If, as has been widely speculated, the Red Sox want to discuss a contract extension for outfielder Jacoby Ellsbury this winter, Ellsbury is more than willing to listen.
Scott Boras, the agent for Ellsbury, has a track record of advising players to wait for free agency rather than agree to contract extensions with their current team, believing that players benefit from having more teams bid.
But Boras said nothing is absolute and the decision will be up to Ellsbury.
"It doesn't have anything to do with the player's service time,'' said Boras, "or whether or not he's a free agent. I've done deals for players with four years or five years service time, or before free agency. I did one with (Greg) Maddux in Atlanta. We were able to have a meeting of the minds about what his free agent value would be and we got (a deal) without free agency.
"I don't use anything as a bar. I just look at a situation, evaluate it, communicate with the team and go from there.''
Having missed most of 2010 and half of this season with injuries, Ellsbury's durability may become an issue, both in negotiations with the Red Sox or with others if he elects to wait for free agency.
But Boras isn't concerned that teams will see his client as brittle.
"Players are accountable for what their bodies do,'' said Boras. "They're not accountable for impact injuries. In Jacoby's case, he's had a player fall on him (Ben Zobrist) and a player run into him (Adrian Beltre). That's freakish behavior. It has nothing to do with Jacoby Ellsbury's durability. He's a very sound athlete and his body is fit and he plays much younger than his chronological age.
"So in the game, I don't think anybody's worried about the durability of Jacoby Ellsbury. The only factor, when you get into all those things, is that when you evaluate players, you may have less statistical (data with which to judge a player). The durability is defined by a player's performance and his ability to withstand (injuries) when he plays.''
Speculation also has Ellsbury interested in playing closer to home on the West Coast, and perhaps in a less intrusive market. But Boras said Ellsbury isn't uncomfortable in Boston.
"Jacoby was raised (as a player) in Boston,'' he said. "Boston's comfortable. It's a place where he knows how to play. I think it's much harder for players raised outside of Boston to play there. When a player is raised there, there's a value to that.
"When fans are raised in other organization and then come to Fenway, there's a 'wow' factor. And that's a good thing. But it's not the norm. For a guy like Jacoby, I think there's a real value point for the team to know that someone fits so well in Boston.''

Former Red Sox prospect Andy Marte killed in car crash in Dominican Republic

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Former Red Sox prospect Andy Marte killed in car crash in Dominican Republic

Former major leaguer Andy Marte, a one-time top prospect in the Red Sox organization, was killed in a car crash in the Dominican Republic on Sunday. He was 33.

Marte was killed the same day that Royals pitcher Yordano Ventura died in a separate car crash in the Dominican. Ventura was 25. Coincidentally, Ventura was the Royals starting pitcher in Marte's final major league game, for the Arizona Diamondbacks on Aug. 6, 2014.

Marte, drafted by the Braves in 2000, was ranked the No. 9 prospect in baseball in 2005 when the third baseman was traded to the Red Sox as part of the deal that sent shortstop Edgar Renteria to Atlanta and Marte became the top-ranked prospect in the Red Sox organization.  

Marte was traded by the Red Sox to the Indians in 2006 in the deal that sent Coco Crisp to Boston and spent five seasons with Cleveland. His best season was 2009 (.232, six home runs, 25 RBI in 47 games). After a six-game stint with Arizona in 2014, he played in South Korea the past two years.  

Metropolitan traffic authorities in the Dominican told the Associated Press that Marte died when a car he was driving his a house along the highway between San Francisco de Macoris and Pimentel, about 95 miles (150 kilometers) north of the capital.
 

Royals pitcher Yordano Ventura killed in car crash in Dominican Republic

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Royals pitcher Yordano Ventura killed in car crash in Dominican Republic

Kansas City Royals pitcher Yordano Ventura was killed in a car crash in in the Dominican Republic on Sunday morning, according to multiple reports. Ventura was 25 years old.

Highway patrol spokesman Jacobo Mateo told the Associated Press that Ventura died on a highway leading to the town of Juan Adrian, about 40 miles (70 kilometers) northwest of Santo Domingo. He says it's not clear if Ventura was driving.

Ventura was killed the same day former major leaguer Andy Marte died in a separate car crash in the Dominican. Coincidentally, Ventura was the starting pitcher in Marte's final MLB game, for the Arizona Diamondbacks on Aug. 6, 2014. 

Ventura was 13-8 with a 4.08 ERA for the Royals' 2015 World Series champions and 11-12 with a 4.45 ERA in 32 starts in 2016. The right-hander made his major league debut in 2013 and in 2014 went 14-10 with a 3.20 ERA for Kansas City's A.L. pennant winners. 

Ironically, Ventura paid tribute to his good friend and fellow Dominican, Oscar Tavares, who was also killed in a car crash in the D.R. in October 2014, by wearing Tavares' initials and R.I.P. on his cap before Ventura's start in Game 6 of the World Series in 2014. 

Ventura is the second current major league player to die in the past five months. Former Miami Marlins ace Jose Fernandez was killed in a boating accident in Miami on Sept. 25.