Early notes: Lackey lands on DL

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Early notes: Lackey lands on DL

By Maureen Mullen
CSNNE.com

BOSTON Right-hander Scott Atchison was in the Red Sox clubhouse early Monday afternoon. But, manager Terry Francona called it a miscommunication.

He actually was picking something up, Francona said.

As it turns out, Atchison was actually picking up his place on the Red Sox roster. Just before game time the team announced that John Lackey was placed on the disabled list, retroactive to May 12, with a right elbow strain.

Lackey, 32, has struggled this season. In seven starts he is 2-5 with an ERA of 8.01. He is in the second year of a five-year, 82.5 million contract. The Sox hold a conditional option for 2015. If Lackey misses significant time with surgery in 2010-2014 for a pre-existing elbow injury, they can pick up the 2015 option at the major league minimum salary.

Although Lackey did not spend time on the DL last season, his first with the Sox, he began 2008 and 2009 on the DL, with a strained right triceps and a strained right forearm, respectively.

In his last start, May 11 in Toronto, he went 6 23 innings, giving up nine runs on nine this and five walks with one strikeout. After the game, he said Everything in his life stinks right now.

Although Lackey did not get more specific than that, he announced in spring training that his wife Krista had been treated in the offseason for breast cancer.

Before Mondays announcement of Lackeys trip to the DL, Francona said Lackey was feeling better after his latest side session.

I think Lack felt really good about himself after his side the other day, Francona said. I know theyve been working on things in the bullpen as they always do. Hands over the head, hands below on the deliverythings like that that all pitching coaches and pitchers do. Its always a constant work in progress.

There have been games all year where hes had a drop in velocity in a certain inning. Its not always been the same inning.

Several factors can contribute to that, Francona said.

Is there baserunners? Is he in a bind? Is he trying to locate? Is it physical? A lot of those things we try to figure out ourselves, Francona said.

But they had come up with no answers.

Not yet, Francona said. We always try. Were here all day. Maybe sometimes we try too hard.

Lackey had a similar issue with a drop in velocity last season.

Yeah, at times, Francona said. Im not sure its even a problem as sometimes he starts pitching a little bit

Shortstop Marco Scutaro, on the DL since May 8 with a left oblique strain, returned to the team after receiving treatment -- ice, heat, laser, and cardio work -- over the weekend at his home in Miami.

I cant even really tell how it feels until I start swinging, said Scutaro. I dont feel anything, just when I move. I didnt do anything all last week, so from today on, Ill be doing activities, and well go from there.

The next step for him will be swinging a bat, which could be today. Up until now, hes been cautious. The medical staff told him the injury gets worse, it could take two months to heal.

Right-hander Bobby Jenks, on the DL since May 2 with a right biceps strain, is getting close to being able to play catch.

I hope so, Francona said. Hell be examined today by Red Sox medical director, Dr. Tom Gill. Obviously thats kind of an important exam. He has to be symptom-free or I think the feeling is hell be putting a Band-Aid on something that we want getting better.

Maureen Mullen is on Twitter at http:twitter.commaureenamullen

Dustin Pedroia taking cues from Tom Brady to extend his career

Dustin Pedroia taking cues from Tom Brady to extend his career

Dustin Pedroia is no stranger to injuries. That's a big reason why he's no longer a stranger to the sometimes peculiar practices of New England Patriots quarterback Tom Brady.

In an interview on WEEI's "Bradfo Show," Pedroia told Rob Bradford that he's been taking cues from the five-time Super Bowl-winning QB to help extend his playing career and make his body healthier and more durable.

“I understand what he does and know what he does. I think it’s awesome,” Pedroia told Bradford. “There’s a reason why he’s successful at his age (39), and he looks better now than he did when he first came to the league. You have to be smarter as you get older and learn different styles -- the way to train and the way you take care of your body to be able to perform and stay on the field. It doesn’t matter what sport you’re playing. He’s definitely got that figured out.”

Pedroia, of course, played the entire 2013 World Series-winning season with a torn ligament in his thumb. He's battled through various other lower body and hand injuries over the past few seasons, as well. But in 2016, he had his best season in recent memory, posting his highest OPS since 2011, as WEEI notes.

Part of that is with his own take on the Brady approach -- which focuses more on pliability and resistance training than extensive, heavy weight lifting -- and a healthier overall lifestyle, something Brady is notoriously infamous for having.

"There’s tons of ways to take care of your body. It’s not just get in the weight room and throw weights around,” Pedroia explained. “As you get older, the human body can’t take the pounding if you’re going in there and power lifting. When you’re younger, you can handle some of that. But as you get older, you got to be smarter. Sometimes less is more -- whether that’s weight or reps or whatever. You’ve just got to be smart. And eating wise, that’s a big part of recovery. If you put the right foods in your body, you’ll heal faster if you’re injured or recover faster. It’s like a car, man. Put bad gas in, bro. It’s not going to be the same as good gas.”

He hopes the approach can, at the very least, keep him moving for quite some time.

“I plan on living until I’m 100," he said. "So we’re not even halfway home."

Hanley Ramirez's shoulder already a concern for Red Sox heading into WBC

Hanley Ramirez's shoulder already a concern for Red Sox heading into WBC

Another year, another injury concern for Hanley Ramirez. This time, though, it's a bit more complicated.

Boston Red Sox manager John Farrell told the media Monday that Ramirez hadn't played any first base during spring training yet due to discomfort in his right throwing shoulder.

“Well, we’re working through ramping up his throwing program,” Farrell said, via WEEI.com's Rob Bradford. “That has taken a little bit more time than anticipated coming in so we’ve got to kind of take that day to day how much we can increase the intensity with the throwing. He’s just working through some soreness with the throwing.”

As Bradford points out, Ramirez and the Red Sox went through the same process last year. Where it differs this time around is Ramirez's scheduled participation in the World Baseball Classic: He's expected to report to Team Domincan Republic on Friday, which means the Red Sox won't be monitoring his every move on the field (though the two training staffs will be communicating daily, also per Bradford).

Ramirez isn't the only first baseman on the roster, with the Cleveland Indians' Carlos Santana there as well. So will Ramirez be jumping into game action anytime soon?

“I don’t know what I’m going to do. They haven’t told me anything,” Ramirez told WEEI.com “I’m just going to go there and see.”