Crawford's wrist 'fine,' waiting on elbow

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Crawford's wrist 'fine,' waiting on elbow

BOSTON Left fielder Carl Crawford said his left wrist, on which he had surgery in mid-January, is fine, but hes waiting for his left elbow to heal. Crawford was moved from the 15-day to the 60-day disabled list on May 2.

Right now Im just still letting it rest up, trying to do little exercises with it right now, just waiting for the clearance from the doctor basically, Crawford said.

The pain from the shot just went away so now I think were going into another transition where we might start doing exercises with it. I still havent been able to throw yet. Im still a couple of weeks from throwing.

He may need to throw for a couple of weeks to get back to full health, but he is not sure.

In an ideal situation, yes, but I can't honestly tell you when, he said.

I think I should start hitting in a couple of weeks, pretty soon. I think Im going to actually start hitting before I throw.

Hes not sure of the progression once he does start throwing.

I hope its fast but I really dont know, he said. Im kind of going on what the doctors, whatever kind of program they make for me Im just going to try to follow that and let them know how I feel afterwards. But I hope its a quick one.

The good news is his wrist is healthy.

The wrist is doing fine, knock on wood, he said. Hopefully I dont have any more setbacks with that, but the wrist is actually feeling real good. The wrist is ready to go. Thats what stinks about this whole process: the wrist finally got well and I had this setback. So if the elbow was fine, Id be ready to go.

I definitely want to be out there. No secret about that but I just kind of have to go at the pace that they have me go. I can't go too fast or anything like that. I just have to be patient.

You just want to at least be able to see the team all together so you could see what we can do together but its frustrating not having everybody out there knowing what a lot of guys could be doing and we could help the team, so its a little frustrating."

Chris Sale blanks Angels for 6 innings in Red Sox 6-2 win

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Chris Sale blanks Angels for 6 innings in Red Sox 6-2 win

ANAHEIM, Calif. - Chris Sale pitched six scoreless innings and the Boston Red Sox rode a five-run first inning to a 6-2 victory over the Los Angeles Angels on Friday night.

Sale (12-4) allowed four hits and struck out nine to push his major league-leading total to 200. He walked one and lowered his American League-best ERA to 2.48.

He has won 11 of his last 13 decisions.

Sale improved to 6-0 against the Angels with a 1.23 ERA in seven starts (nine games).

Boston jumped on erratic Angels starter Ricky Nolasco (4-11) in the first, with six of its first seven batters collecting a hit. Nolasco went four innings and allowed all six runs on nine hits and a walk.

The Angels avoided a shutout when Martin Maldonado hit a solo home run off reliever Kyle Martin in the seventh.

Drellich: Red Sox play the waiting game as deadline approaches

Drellich: Red Sox play the waiting game as deadline approaches

BOSTON -- Doug Fister’s start on Thursday was the clearest reason an 8-6 Red Sox loss to the Blue Jays felt like a bridge day. He was there to give some rest to the other starters, which was a worthy idea. But Fister’s command was poor enough to make that decision questionable.

Presumably, Fister’s time as starter for the Sox is now over, although manager John Farrell was noncommittal afterward.

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Add it to the list of reasons the Red Sox look like a team in limbo at the moment. They’re in first place, while simultaneously playing a waiting game.

Whom the Sox acquire before the non-waiver trade deadline at the end of the month, and how long they wait to pull off a deal, looms large. Because even though the offense has looked better the last two days, it was still the primary drawback during a 4-4 homestand within the division.

Chris Sale and David Price will be on the mound to start a three-game weekend series against the Angels in Anaheim, so at least a feeling of normalcy should return.

“Back to the top of the rotation,” Farrell said. “We’ve got a chance to hopefully catch up with some recovery days down that bullpen. Anytime Chris and David are walking to the mound, we feel like we're extremely confident.”

But now, someone new needs to walk through the clubhouse door. Someone will, too -- it’s just a matter of when, lest Dave Dombrowski’s m.o. all of a sudden changes 40-plus years into his career.

There’s no confusion about what should be done.

As nice as it is that Christian Vazquez is capable of playing third base, the Red Sox need to find a situation where they have a third baseman who can start the game and finish it -- where they have someone whose bat is good enough to do so.

Vazquez manning third at the end of Thursday’s game is symbolic of the position on a whole: it’s been left to the warmest body at the moment, rather than someone who truly has a handle on the job.

Top prospect Rafael Devers has been hitting very well in his brief stint at Triple-A Pawtucket, going 8-for-22 (.364) in six games, with a .440 on-base percentage and a pair of home runs. He has four strikeouts compared to three walks.

But considering the way Dombrowski has spoken all season, the Sox seem intent on doing what’s best for Devers’ development rather than rushing the 20-year-old to aid the major league team. And what was right for Devers’ development thus far this season, as the Sox saw it, was three months at Double-A.

Spending only a week in Triple-A, or really anything less than a month, then, would seem hasty. Even a late August or September call-up would be a quick move, relatively speaking.

Barring a change of heart, then, help still needs to come from the outside. Even if the Sox believe in Devers for this year, he would still be an unknown commodity in the big leagues, and the Sox at this point need something more than that.

There’s a piece missing, at least one. Everyone’s waiting to see what comes next, including the clubhouse.