Crawford placed on DL with strained left hamstring

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Crawford placed on DL with strained left hamstring

By Maureen Mullen
CSNNE.com Follow @maureenamullen
BOSTON -- Left fielder Carl Crawford has been placed on the 15-day disabled list with a strained left hamstring. Crawford injured his leg beating out an infield single in the first inning Friday night against the Brewers.

The Sox medical staff said Crawford would be out at least 10-14 days, making the decision to put the left fielder on the DL an easy one.

Outfielder Josh Reddick was called up from Triple-A Pawtucket to take Crawfords place on the roster.

Manager Terry Francona said he would use Darnell McDonald, Mike Cameron, Reddick, and possibly Drew Sutton to take Crawfords place in the field and in the lineup. McDonald is starting in left tonight, batting sixth.

In 67 games this season, Crawford is batting .243 with six home runs, 31 RBI, and eight stolen bases in 12 attempts. He is in the first year of a seven-year, 142 million contract.

Reddick in his second stint with the Sox this season. He was also called up May 26, when Darnell McDonald went on the DL with a left quad strain, returning to Pawtucket on June 5. He has become accustomed to such moves.

Thats one role that Ive become accustomed to in the last few years that Ive been up and down with these guys and I feel like I know my role pretty well, he said. You can't get down on yourself. Youve just got to be ready to play every day and go through the same routines no matter what, whether you're playing or not playing.

I found real fast that youve got to stay in your routine whether you're playing or not. Last year that got really tough and frustrating and I just didn't stick with it. This year Ive kind of stuck with my routine whether I was playing down there or up here, so it seems to be keeping me in line a little bit more and in my groove a little bit better.

The left-handed hitting Reddick has hit .385 (5-for-13), with four RBI. He is third in the International League with 14 home runs. He was not in the starting lineup against Milwaukee left-hander Randy Wolf.

Hopefully, I can get in there against righties and play some left field, he said. I havent done it a whole lot this year but Ive done it in the past so I feel pretty comfortable out there.

Ive been out there the last two years. Ive been out there a few times but its just pretty simple. As they say anything thats hit over your head is off the wall so anything in front of you can pretty much come in on so thats the one thing I live by. Im not going to be afraid to go against the wall because I know Ells is there and hes quick enough to get over there.

Reddick, who made his major league debut July 31, 2009, has had several calls to help the big league team. While its always exciting, its different than it was that first time.

You always get excited, he said. But I dont think its as exciting as it was those first couple of times when you come up here and debut. You feel more comfortable and its something you're ready for as opposed to not being ready in the past. So its definitely a lot different now.

Having made the trip up and down I-95 between Boston and Pawtucket numerous times, he has a suggestion.

I think I told right-hander Michael Bowden last year or the beginning of this year theyre going to name that Lou Merloni Highway after me or him, Reddick said. Its better to be that guy than the guy that doesnt get the call at all. Got to look at it as a positive thing.

Maureen Mullen is on Twitter at http:twitter.commaureenamullen.

Rosenthal: 'Some' Sox players question Farrell's leadership, game management

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Rosenthal: 'Some' Sox players question Farrell's leadership, game management

Fox Sports' Ken Rosenthal ignited a local firestorm when he made a seemingly off-hand comment a few days ago that he "wouldn't be surprised" if the Red Sox fired John Farrell this year. (He quickly added he also "wouldn't be surprised" if Farrell stayed on and led the team to the A.L. East title this year, but that got scant mention.)

Today, however, Rosenthal expounded on Farrell and the Sox in a lengthy column on foxsports.com. While acknowledging the team's injuries and beyond-the-manager's-control inconsistencies (in the starting rotation and with the offense), he also ominously added, "The excuses for the Sox, though, go only so far — all teams deal with injuries, and not all of them boast $200 million payrolls. Other issues also have emerged under Farrell . . . "

Farrell, even when he won the 2013 World Series as a rookie manager, was not popular in all corners of the clubhouse. Some players, but not all, believe that he does not stand up for them strongly enough to the media when the team is struggling, sources say. Some also question Farrell’s game management, talk that exists in virtually every clubhouse, some more than others.

And then he mentioned two leadership problems:

The first occurred during the Red Sox’s prolonged dispute with the Orioles’ Manny Machado. Second baseman Dustin Pedroia, after Matt Barnes threw at Machado’s head, shouted across the field to Machado, 'it wasn’t me,' then told reporters that it was 'definitely a mishandled situation,' without mentioning Barnes or Farrell by name . . . 

The second incident occurred last Saturday, when Farrell engaged in a heated exchange with left-hander Drew Pomeranz in the dugout . . . [Pomeranz's] willingness to publicly challenge Farrell, in an exchange captured by television cameras, offered another indication that the manager and some of his players are not always on the same page.

Hmm.

Farrell addressed the "hot seat" issue Tuesday in an interview with MLB Network Radio.

Rosenthal's piece comes at a time when some of Farrell's harshest local critics are more or less giving him a pass, instead blaming Dave Dombrowski's flawed roster construction for the Sox' early season struggles , , , 

But there has been speculation hereabouts on whether or not Farrell has control of the clubhouse . . . 

Now that Rosenthal has weighed in, that sort of talk should increase.

In the end, Rosenthal makes no prediction on Farrell's future other than to conclude "If Dombrowski senses a change is necessary, he’ll make a change." 

But one prediction that can be made: The should-Farrell-be-fired? debate, which raged at unrealistic levels last year when the Red Sox won the division, isn't going to end anytime soon.