Boston Celtics

Wilcox to host golf outing in support of Lupus foundation

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Wilcox to host golf outing in support of Lupus foundation

Missing most of last season after heart surgery in the spring was a major jolt emotionally for Chris Wilcox.

But it pales in comparison to the Celtics forward has endured in his personal life -- the kind of pain that he's trying to prevent others from having to experience.

His latest effort will kick into high gear on Friday with the Fourth Annual Chris Wilcox Golf Charity Outing at the Myrtle Beach (S.C.) National Golf Club.

There will also be a silent auction that will include autographed items from many, including Celtics all-stars Kevin Garnett and Rajon Rondo.

The proceeds will benefit the Lupus Foundation of America.

This particular disease hits home for Wilcox, who inked a one-year deal to return to Boston earlier this month.

"It's been something that's been in my family a long time," Wilcox told CSNNE.com in a phone interview.

Wilcox lost an aunt to the disease about 20 years ago.

Since then, a number of family members that includes his sister Tehesia, have tested positive for the autoimmune disease that does not have a cure.

Those with the disease have an immune system that can not differentiate between healthy tissues in the body and germs or bacteria. So the antibodies that the body produces to fend off harmful microorganisms, are also attacking healthy tissues, which leads to discomfort, inflammation and a series of potential complications to other vital organs such as the kidneys and lungs.

"I try to do whatever I can to slow it down," said Wilcox, who said his tests for the disease came back negative. "I have cousins that have it as well."

The Lupus Foundation of America estimates that 1.5 million people and 5 million worldwide, have some form of Lupus.

And while it can affect both men and women of all ages, 90 percent of those with the disease are women according to the Lupus Foundation of America with most ranging between 15-44 years of age. In addition, studies have found that certain ethnic groups (people of African, Asian, HispanicLatino, Native American, Native Hawaiian, or Pacific Island descent) have a greater risk of developing the disease.

"It's definitely something that's close to me," Wilcox said. "But there are so many other families dealing with it, too. I'm just trying to do whatever I can to help so hopefully we can find a cure or at least find a way to slow it down."

For more information, you can check out Chris Wilcox's website at www.chriswilcox54.com or the home page for the Lupus Foundation of America.

NBA adds 'Harden Rule' and 'Zaza Rule' for players' safety

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NBA adds 'Harden Rule' and 'Zaza Rule' for players' safety

NEW YORK - NBA referees will be able to call flagrant or technical fouls on defenders who dangerously close on jump shooters without allowing them space to land, as Zaza Pachulia did on the play that injured Spurs star Kawhi Leonard in last season's playoffs.

Officials will also make sure jump shooters are in their upward shooting motion when determining if a perimeter foul is worthy of free throws, which could cut down on James Harden's attempts after he swings his arms into contact.

The new rules interpretations are being unofficially called the "Harden Rule" and the "Zaza Rule". The Washington Wizards accused the Celtics' Al Horford of a dangerous closeout on Markieff Morris that injured Morris and knocked him out of Game 1 of their playoff series two weeks before the Pachulia-Leonard play.

Leonard sprained his ankle when Pachulia slid his foot under Leonard's in Game 1 of Golden State's victory in the Western Conference finals. After calling a foul, officials will now be able to look at a replay to determine if the defender recklessly positioned his foot in an unnatural way, which could trigger an upgrade to a flagrant, or a technical if there was no contact but an apparent attempt to injure.

"It's 100 percent for the safety of the players," NBA senior vice president of replay and referee operations Joe Borgia said Thursday.

The NBA had made the freedom to land a point of emphasis for officials a few years ago, because of the risk of injuries. 

Officials can still rule the play a common foul if they did not see a dangerous or unnatural attempt by the defender upon review. Borgia said Pachulia's foul would have been deemed a flagrant.

With the fouls on the perimeter shots - often coming when the offensive player has come off a screen and quickly attempts to launch a shot as his defender tries to catch up - officials will focus on the sequencing of the play. The player with the ball must already be in his shooting motion when contact is made, rather than gathering the ball to shoot such as on a drive to the basket.

"We saw it as a major trend in the NBA so we had to almost back up and say, `Well, wait a minute, this is going to be a trend, so let's catch up to it,"' NBA president of league operations Byron Spruell said.