Shelvin Mack ready if Celtics call

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Shelvin Mack ready if Celtics call

Shelvin Mack knows how to stay ready.

The Maine Red Claws guard has not received a call from the undermanned Boston Celtics, but if he does, he will be prepared to take his game back to the NBA.

Mack could be an option to fill an open roster spot following the season-ending ACL injuries suffered by Rajon Rondo just over two weeks ago and Leandro Barbosa on Monday. He leads the Celtics NBA Development League affiliate in scoring this season (19.6 ppg) and is also averaging 7.6 assists and 4.7 rebounds per game.

Mack was in Texas on Tuesday evening with the Red Claws to take on the Rio Grande Valley Vipers. While aware of the Celtics backcourt vacancies, he was focused on doing the best he could in his current situation just hours before tip off.

"I feel like it would be a great opportunity," Mack said of the Celtics, adding, "(I haven't been given any indication from the Celtics), I try not to worry about that. That's another thing I've learned throughout this process, just worry about the things you can control. I can't control how they're thinking, All I can control is just going out and playing basketball, trying to be a great basketball player and a great teammate."

At 22 years old, Mack already has NBA experience. He was selected by the Washington Wizards with the 34th overall pick in the 2011 NBA Draft and appeared in 64 games for them last season. He posted 3.6 points, 2.0 assists, and 1.4 rebounds in 12.2 minutes backing up John Wall.

The Wizards invited Mack to training camp this season, and although they waived him in October, they called him up from the Red Claws in December. After Mack returned to Maine in early January, the Philadelphia 76ers called him up twice. He believes there is a place for him in the pros.

"The NBA is all about finding the right situation and the right fit for you," Mack told CSNNE.com in a telephone interview. "Some guys get lucky and are able to find that early, and some guys it kind of takes a while. The D-League was the best opportunity I had. If I felt like I wasn't an NBA player, I wouldn't have three call ups so far this year, I wouldn't be on the radar for the Celtics. It's just finding the right situation that's best for you. ... With the right situation and the right team, I'll be able to show how valuable I really am."

Mack is familiar with the Celtics system through playing for the Red Claws. He embraces their fundamentals and values their team-first mentality.

"The biggest thing I know with the system is, it's not about individual stats. It's all about championships and competing at a high level," he said. "I'm a big fan of defense. Everyone can score points but a lot of things come down to effort and being able to play defense."

Mack also already knows several of the Celtics players. He has worked out with Jeff Green in Washington, D.C., played alongside Fab Melo on the Red Claws, and known Jared Sullinger for years through basketball camps. His closest friend on the team is fellow Kentucky native Rajon Rondo, who has helped him during his journey to the league.

"We work out a little bit together and he's a real good friend," Mack explained. "He tries to help me out with my game and fill me in on the process and the business."

6-foot-3 Mack compares his game to that of Chauncey Billups -- "real calm, cool, a solid basketball player that understands how to win," he explained. As a three-year member of the Butler Bulldogs, he appeared in the 2010 and 2011 NCAA National Championship games. He also won a gold medal as captain of the USA U19 World Championship in 2009.

"I'm a guy (people) can depend on who's going to come in and compete and play hard," he said. "I will do whatever you can to help the team win."

If the Celtics were to call, Mack would embrace the opportunity just as he has with the Wizards and 76ers -- "It'd be another blessing," he said. For now, though, his role is to help the Red Claws succeed in the D-League. He knows losing sight of that goal won't help him attain the bigger picture of making it in the NBA.

"I've been kind of going through this process all year," he said. "I'm just worrying about the things you can control. I see a lot of guys every year that look at message boards and read what's on the Internet and it affects their game. If it's going to happen, it's going to happen. If not, I've just got to stay ready and keep grinding."

Bradley's emergence as vocal leader speaks volumes about growth

Bradley's emergence as vocal leader speaks volumes about growth

BOSTON –  Terry Rozier was having a rough stretch where his minutes were limited and when he did play, he didn’t play particularly well.
 
Among the voices in his ear offering words of encouragement was Avery Bradley who knows all too well what Rozier was going through.
 
For all his time as a Celtic, Bradley has let his work on the floor do the talking for him.
 
But as the most tenured Celtic on the roster, his leadership has to be about more than just getting the job done, but servicing as a vocal leader as well.
 
For a player whose growth from one year to the next has been a constant, being a more vocal leader has been the one dynamic of his game that has improved the most during this past season.
 
And it is that kind of leadership that will carry into the summer what is a pivotal offseason for both Bradley and this Celtics franchise which was eliminated by Cleveland in the Conference finals, the first time the Celtics got that deep in the playoffs since 2012.
 
He is entering the final year of the four-year, $32 million contract he signed in 2014. And it comes at a time when his fellow Tacoma, Wash. native and backcourt mate Isaiah Thomas will likely hit free agency where he’s expected to command a max or near-max contract that would pay him an annual salary in the neighborhood of $30 million.
 
At this point in time, Bradley isn’t giving too much thought to his impending contract status.
 
Instead, he’s more consumed by finding ways to improve his overall game and in doing so, help guide the Celtics to what has to be their focus for next season – a trip to the NBA Finals.
 
While Celtics players have said their focus has always been on advancing as far into the playoffs as possible, it wasn’t until this past season did they actually provide hope and promise that Banner 18 may be closer than you think.
 
It was an emotional time for the Celtics, dealing with the unexpected death of Chyna Thomas, the younger sister of Isaiah Thomas, just hours before Boston’s first playoff game this season.
 
And then there were injuries such as Thomas’ right hip strain that ended his postseason by halftime of Boston’s Eastern Conference finals matchup with Cleveland.
 
But through that pain, we saw the emergence of Bradley in a light we have seldom seen him in as a Celtic.
 
We have seen him play well in the past, but it wasn’t until Thomas’ injury did we see Bradley showcase even more elements of his game that had been overlooked.
 
One of the constant knocks on Bradley has been his ball-handling.
 
And yet there were a number of occasions following Thomas’ playoff-ending injury, where Bradley attacked defenders off the dribble and finished with lay-ups and an occasional dunk in transition.
 
Among players who appeared in at least 12 playoff games this year, only Washington’s John Wall (7.9), Cleveland’s LeBron James (6.8) and Golden State’s Stephen Curry (5.2) averaged more points in transition than Bradley (4.7).
 
Bradley recognized the team needed him to be more assertive, do things that forced him to be more front-and-center which is part of his evolution in Boston as a leader on this team.
 
“It’s weird but players like Al (Horford) definitely helped me get out of my shell and pushed me this year to be more of a vocal leader,” Bradley said.
 
And that talent combined with Bradley doing what he does every offseason – come back significantly better in some facet of his game – speaks to how he’s steadily growing into being a leader whose actions as well as his words are impactful.