Boston Celtics

Like Rondo did, Wall needs veteran presence

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Like Rondo did, Wall needs veteran presence

BOSTON Washington point guard John Wall has similar Maserati-like speed on the basketball court akin to another former playmaking stud at the University of Kentucky, Boston's Rajon Rondo.

But in seeing where Rondo is as a player, and where Wall's at, there is one difference that will make it all the more challenging for Wall to develop into an upper echelon point guard like Rondo.

It's experience; no, not his experience but rather, the experience of those around him.

The average Celtic is 28.5 years old, while the average Wizards (0-4) player is 25 years old.

The gap is even wider when you compare the C's starters are 32.6 years of age compared to 25.4 for the Wizards.

For all the growth that we have seen in Rondo's game, it just wouldn't have happened if not for the many veterans he has constantly been surrounded with as a Celtic.

Wall hasn't been so fortunate.

"Rondo really developed his first three years," said Wizards coach Flip Saunders. "You hope that John can continue, as far as doing those things."

But Saunders points out the biggest hurdle that will make Wall's development a lot tougher than Rondo's progress.

"Rondo came into a situation with 3 Hall of Fame players," Saunders said. "(Ray) Allen, (Kevin) Garnett and (Paul) Pierce all all going to be hall of fame players. John didn't walk into that type of situation. John has more pressure on him."

And that pressure has at times gotten the best of Wall, the No. 1 overall pick in the 2010 NBA draft.

Although he is Washington's top scorer at 14.5 points per game, he has been among the many Wizards players struggling to make shots.

He comes into tonight's game shooting just 32 percent from the field.

"He needs to relax a little bit. He's forcing some things," Saunders said. "He wants it so bad. We've always known that; that he has a tendency to get down on himself when things are going bad. He's a perfectionist. And when he's not playing well, he's the hardest on himself, as anybody. He just needs to kind of let happen."

In other words, he's like . . . Rondo.

The two former Wildcats spent some time together on campus this summer, playing in pick-up games.

"He's (Rondo) somebody that knows how to win at this level," Wall told CSNNE.com. "He just learned and got better year by year. That's what I'm trying to do."

Both Saunders and Rondo believe Wall will continue to improve.

He showed signs of getting on track in Boston's 94-86 win, a game in which he had 19 points, eight assists and seven rebounds.

Wall was good; but Rondo?

Even better.

Not only did Rondo and the C's get the win, but Rondo tallied his first triple-double of the season (14th of his career) with 18 points, 14 assists and 11 rebounds.

And while Rondo believes in Wall's talent, not having more veterans around him will make his growth as an elite player much tougher.

"I had veteran guys back me up and I played with," Rondo said. "So they've helped me mature as a player each year. Not a knock on the players he's playing with, but having veteran players is big for a young guy. I've been around these guys for four or five years now. I've seen their work habits. I've seen how they've matured and helped me mature as a man."

NBA adds 'Harden Rule' and 'Zaza Rule' for players' safety

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NBA adds 'Harden Rule' and 'Zaza Rule' for players' safety

NEW YORK - NBA referees will be able to call flagrant or technical fouls on defenders who dangerously close on jump shooters without allowing them space to land, as Zaza Pachulia did on the play that injured Spurs star Kawhi Leonard in last season's playoffs.

Officials will also make sure jump shooters are in their upward shooting motion when determining if a perimeter foul is worthy of free throws, which could cut down on James Harden's attempts after he swings his arms into contact.

The new rules interpretations are being unofficially called the "Harden Rule" and the "Zaza Rule". The Washington Wizards accused the Celtics' Al Horford of a dangerous closeout on Markieff Morris that injured Morris and knocked him out of Game 1 of their playoff series two weeks before the Pachulia-Leonard play.

Leonard sprained his ankle when Pachulia slid his foot under Leonard's in Game 1 of Golden State's victory in the Western Conference finals. After calling a foul, officials will now be able to look at a replay to determine if the defender recklessly positioned his foot in an unnatural way, which could trigger an upgrade to a flagrant, or a technical if there was no contact but an apparent attempt to injure.

"It's 100 percent for the safety of the players," NBA senior vice president of replay and referee operations Joe Borgia said Thursday.

The NBA had made the freedom to land a point of emphasis for officials a few years ago, because of the risk of injuries. 

Officials can still rule the play a common foul if they did not see a dangerous or unnatural attempt by the defender upon review. Borgia said Pachulia's foul would have been deemed a flagrant.

With the fouls on the perimeter shots - often coming when the offensive player has come off a screen and quickly attempts to launch a shot as his defender tries to catch up - officials will focus on the sequencing of the play. The player with the ball must already be in his shooting motion when contact is made, rather than gathering the ball to shoot such as on a drive to the basket.

"We saw it as a major trend in the NBA so we had to almost back up and say, `Well, wait a minute, this is going to be a trend, so let's catch up to it,"' NBA president of league operations Byron Spruell said.