Rivers surprises staff, puts assistant in charge of second half

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Rivers surprises staff, puts assistant in charge of second half

BOSTON Players aren't the only ones Doc Rivers throws into unexpected scenarios this time of year.

The Boston Celtics coach, to the surprise of many - including his staff - spent the second half of Boston's 97-96 loss to Brooklyn inside the locker room.

Rivers left longtime assistant Armond Hill in charge of the team in his absence.

"He's always said that as much as players are in training camp, so are coaches," Hill said. "And so what would happen if he gets thrown out, we gotta be prepared."

Last season, Rivers was tied with then-Charlotte head coach Paul Silas as the NBA coaching leader in technical fouls, with eight.

Although there was some speculation that Rivers spent the second half watching the presidential debate, it was clear to Hill after the game that Rivers' attention was squarely on the Celtics game.

One of the first things Rivers asked Hill about was his decision to have five guys on the floor down the stretch, but none were point guards.

"But, once I explained that Courtney (Lee) was cramping up a little bit, he understood," Hill said.

Celtics forward Paul Pierce likes the idea of Rivers throwing his assistants into the head coaching seat unexpectedly.

"It's good experience for our assistant coaches," Pierce said. "It might be a case where he gets kicked out of a game. We hope not, but the other guys have to be ready to step up just like the players. There are times when I might foul out; other guys have to be ready."

And Hill is definitely ready.

This will be his ninth season as a Celtics assistant coach. Prior to that, he was an assistant on the Atlanta Hawks staff during the 2003-2004 season. In addition, he spent eight years as a head coach at Columbia University where his 2001-2002 squad led the nation in scoring defense by limiting opponents to just 57 points per game.

A former first-round pick of the Atlanta Hawks in 1976, Hill played eight seasons in the NBA with all but two spent with the Hawks.

And from Hill's perspective, being given a chance by Rivers to coach the Celtics - even if it was for half a game - can do nothing but help him and his coaching career.

"I can only thank Doc for giving me the opportunity to coach," Hill said. "That's what we're all here for. He's taught me and I've been with him and he continues to teach me and he gave me another opportunity tonight."

Jaylen Brown may be the future of Celtics, but he's focused on now

Jaylen Brown may be the future of Celtics, but he's focused on now

BOSTON – This is not how this is supposed to work.

When the regular season ends for high draft picks, there’s usually a nice, warm island awaiting their arrival in late-April when the regular season ends.

But this was no typical rookie season for Boston’s Jaylen Brown.

And as we have seen, Brown isn’t your typical rookie.

Drafted with the third overall pick in last June’s NBA draft, the 6-foot-7 Brown found himself in the rotation on a Celtics team that advanced all the way to the Eastern Conference finals before having their season end at the hands of the defending NBA champion Cleveland Cavaliers.

The path towards individual and team success is littered with struggles and potholes of strife along with the pain of disappointment cluttering up things as well.

From within that rubble lies promise; the kind that has Celtics Nation justifiably excited about the future of Brown with the Celtics.

But Brown isn’t about the future, folks.

“I’m excited about the now,” he said. “I’m excited about this summer. I try not to look too far ahead. Everybody talks about the future and how much potential we have; I’m worried about the now. I want to be part of the now. That’s all I’m focused on.”

That kind of focus is among the many reasons that despite being a rookie, his teammates quickly sensed that the now-20-year-old had his sights set on not just talking about cracking the rotation but actually putting in the work that would leave head coach Brad Stevens no choice but to play him.

“He’s going to be really good,” said Boston’s Gerald Green. “If he keeps his same mentality; he’s humble. And continue to work on his game and continue to learn.

Green added, “he couldn’t be in a better place, than being here. With his talent and his work ethic, he’s going to be great.”

But like most rookies, Brown’s play was anything but a steady on-the-rise movement.

His first NBA start came on the road at Cleveland on Nov. 3.

Boston lost the game, but Brown won over many with his career-high 19 points while spending a good deal of the night guarding LeBron James.

In his next four games, Brown scored a total of just 17 points.

And in Boston’s first-round series with Chicago, Brown's role shrunk in the last four games – all Celtics wins. In those games, he played a total of just under 10 minutes.

So what did he do?

He got back in the gym, continued to work on his game and do a better job at making the most of the minutes he received.

More than anything else, Brown attributes his improved play as the season progressed to simply figuring out the NBA landscape as far as what he could do and what he needed to work on, to get better.

Which is why there are many who believe that Brown will be a much better player than the one we saw this season.

That said, he still had decent numbers – 6.6 points and 2.8 rebounds while shooting 45.4 percent from the field and 34.1 percent from 3-point range.

“I didn’t know what I was getting myself into, coming into the NBA,” Brown said. “Throughout the year, I don’t think people expected me to contribute as much as I did. Now just getting to the Eastern  Conference finals and losing, it builds a hunger you know;  I have a bad taste in my mouth. Gotta put in work during the offseason and come back stronger.”

Like Brown, Al Horford came into the NBA as a high draft pick who wound up in the playoffs that rookie season.

Horford can totally relate to Brown’s comments about not knowing what he was getting into.

“The first year you’re really feeling everything out,” Horford said. “Jaylen has an understanding now of what the league is about. It’s a lot for a rookie to handle. Now he has a better idea (so) he can just focus on getting better, working on his game and I expect him to be much better his second year.”

Brown will have the knowledge gained from being part of a team that came within three wins of getting to the NBA Finals.

To come that close is tough to accept, but Brown sees it all as part of a bigger plan for him and his role with the Celtics moving forward.

“I can use it as fuel. I’ve been learning all year,” Brown said. “I’ve had ups, I’ve had downs, I’ve had opportunities, I’ve had mistakes. So I’ve been learning and growing and improving all year and I’m going to continue to grow and improve and prove people wrong, prove doubters wrong.”

And that process Brown speaks of has certainly been aided by being in a successful situation like Boston compared to some other lottery picks who saw lots of playing time but showed minimal growth playing lots of minutes.

“Being on a winning team and developing good habits, learning how to win, play the game the right way … learning that at a young age is really going to help me,” Brown said. “A lot of young guys, they don’t learn that early. They have to figure it out three, four, five years in. I’m happy I learned it now.”

And while the learning will continue on for Brown during this offseason, it won’t be nearly as tough now than it was when he came into the league.

“I know exactly what I’m preparing for,” Brown said. “I expect a really different result.”

Brown added, “I want to be ready for whatever is thrown at me; no excuses whatsoever.”

Now that’s how this is supposed to work!