Boston Celtics

Record shows Celtics a mediocre team

619562.jpg

Record shows Celtics a mediocre team

BOSTON Following Friday night's 87-74 loss to Indiana, the Boston Celtics were in keep-your-head-up mode inside their locker room.

Phrases like "it's still early" and "no need to panic" were tossed around with the same kind of frequency as all of their missed shots.

And head coach Doc Rivers felt the same way.

But when talk turned towards the team's 4-4 record and a player said the C's were better than that, Rivers did not bite his tongue in disagreeing with that opinion.

"We're a 4-4 basketball team," Rivers said. "That's what we are. You are what your record is. Don't make no mistake about that."

Being a .500 team just eight games into the season is not reason to panic.

However, acknowledging who they are - a .500 team - is part of the process in moving forward from that position.

"You always have the ability to do something about that," Rivers said. "Right now, Indiana's a 5-2 team and we're a 4-4 team. That's who we are. That's not who we want to be, and that's not who we're going to be hopefully, but right now that's who we are."

Of the Celtics' first eight games, Indiana was clearly one of the tougher challenges even before the tip-off.

Losing to quality opponents like the Pacers or bad teams, doesn't really make much of a difference to Rivers.

"Well, we're 0-fer against quality opponents," Rivers said. "But again, it's eight games into the year, so I'm not going to overdo that."

Photo of Celtics' 1963 White House visit recalls a simpler time

63-celtics-with-jfk.png

Photo of Celtics' 1963 White House visit recalls a simpler time

As the controversy raged Saturday over President Donald Trump's tweet rescinding the White House invitation to Golden State Warriors' star Stephen Curry, a tweeted photo recalling a simpler time for sports team's presidential visits appeared. 

The nostalgic Twitter account @the_60s_at_50 posted a photo from the Celtics' visit to 1600 Pennsylvania Ave and its principal occupant, John F. Kennedy, on Jan. 31, 1963. JFK had invited his hometown NBA team into the Oval Office for what seemed to be a spur-of-the-moment visit.

A newspaper account of the visit was also posted. The defending NBA champion Celtics were in the Washington area to play the Cincinnati Royals at the University of Maryland's Cole Field House that night and had been taking a tour of the White House when Kennedy invited them in. 

All the team members were there except for star center Bill Russell, who, of course, experienced incidents of racism in Boston that were well-documented. However, Russell's absence was blamed on him oversleeping. His teammates said they didn't know they would meet Kennedy on the tour.  

And yes, that's Celtics legend - and CSN's own - Tommy Heinsohn second from right. Coach Red Auerbach is next to the President on the left, Bob Cousy is next to Auerbach and John Havlicek is the first player in the second row on the left.