Pierce, Rivers: Lakers' Buss will be missed

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Pierce, Rivers: Lakers' Buss will be missed

DENVER The Boston Celtics and the Los Angeles Lakers are always going to be fierce rivals.

But those intense emotions are now replaced by the pain that death can bring to those it leaves behind.

Dr. Jerry Buss, majority owner of the Lakers who was vital in reviving them into an NBA power, died on Monday morning.

He was 80 years old.

The Boston Celtics are no different than the rest of the NBA community in mourning the news of his passing.

Paul Pierce, who grew up in nearby Ingelwood, Calif., has fond memories of Buss.

"He's part of the NBA, what this NBA is all about," Pierce said. "Just bringing the Lakers franchise to where it is today. He's pretty much an icon as an owner. Everybody knows who he was. My heart goes out to his family."

Pierce said he had met Buss a few times.

"He'd see me. It didn't matter if I played for the Celtics," Pierce said. "He always had kind words for me, asked me how I was doing. He's just one of those joyful owners."

Buss bought the team in 1979, and soon transformed them into one of the more exciting, successful franchises in the league.

Since the Lakers have been under Buss, the team has won 10 championships.

"He had a great impact on the league and most importantly, on the Lakers," said C's coach Doc Rivers. "When he bought the team, they changed quickly. He bought into the 'Showtime' stuff."

But what Lakers Nation clings to more than anything, is the 10 titles won under his watch which is greater than any team since 1979.

"That's ... you don't have to say much more than that," Rivers said. "He'll be missed."

One of the first challenges for the Lakers is trying to figure out the pecking order in terms of decision-making responsibilities.

Jerry's son Jim, is vice president of player development while Jerry's daughter Jeannie, is executive vice president of business operations. And that doesn't factor in Mitch Kupchak who is the team's general manager.

"His leadership was huge, with Jerry West and Mitch Kupchak," Rivers said of Jerry Buss. "Now with him gone, that leaves a void for them."

Blakely: Celtics make a healthy choice in standing pat at the deadline

Blakely: Celtics make a healthy choice in standing pat at the deadline

BOSTON -- For the second year in a row, the NBA trade deadline has come and gone with the Boston Celtics making no moves.
 
The Celtics were focused on trying to land either Chicago’s Jimmy Butler or Indiana’s Paul George, but Boston’s efforts never gained momentum in the final hours leading up to Thursday’s 3 p.m. trade deadline.

And while there were a handful of potential deals that would have made Boston slightly better, that improvement -- and the cost attached to it -- was just more than Ainge and the Celtics were willing to pay. 
 
And so they hit the final stretch of the season with a roster that – for now at least – looks identical to what they had at the start of the season with one difference --health. 
 
Most of this season, the Celtics have had multiple players out with injuries or various ailments. Currently, Avery Bradley (right Achilles) is the lone Celtic dealing with a significant injury. 
 
And after Bradley practiced some on Thursday, there’s a chance that he might be on the floor Friday night at Toronto. 
 
But there is no question that a significant segment of Celtics Nation is disappointed that Boston didn’t engineer a trade of some sort.
 
“We’re trying to upgrade our team,” said Ainge, Boston’s president of basketball operations. “But it is a delicate balance between short-term goals and long-term goals. Obviously, both are very important. We’re excited where we are on a long-term basis. And this year we didn’t make any trades. Last year we didn’t make any trades.”
 
But in standing pat a year ago, the Celtics solidified their salary cap space to where they could have offered a pair of max contracts to Al Horford – which they did – as well as Kevin Durant who met with Boston but ultimately decided to sign with Golden State. 
 
And by not including their first-round pick last season, the Celtics have Jaylen Brown who is one of the better rookies in this year’s class. 
 
“So we’re happy with the direction that we’re moving,” Ainge said. 
 
But standing pat was not on the agenda for the teams surrounding Boston in the East.
 
Boston’s inability to strike a deal is in sharp contrast to what teams surrounding them did during this trade season. 
 
The Cleveland Cavaliers are the team Boston and the rest of the East are chasing. They acquired Kyle Korver earlier this month, a player who ranks among the NBA’s all-time great 3-point shooters. 
 
Washington added Bojan Bogdanovic from Brooklyn today, providing some much-needed firepower for a Wizards second unit that ranks among the NBA’s lowest scoring groups. 
 
Toronto recently traded for Orlando’s Serge Ibaka, giving the Raptors a defensive-oriented big man who can stretch the floor. 
 
Also today, the Atlanta Hawks picked up Ersan Illyasova from Philadelphia, which should help them space the floor better.
 
Each of those teams addressed a very specific need, something the Celtics were hoping to do. 
 
But more than a player, the Celtics could benefit from a roster with improved health. 
 
The team’s preferred starting five -- Isaiah Thomas, Avery Bradley, Jae Crowder, Al Horford and Amir Johnson -- has a 15-6 record this season. To put that in perspective, that’s a winning percentage of .714 which would be tops in the East and third overall in the NBA for this season. 
 
And with most of the players seemingly back to full strength health-wise now, it’s understandable to some extent why Ainge would be willing to stick with this group for the rest of the season. 
 
“As you’ve been watching lately, we’ve been winning a lot of games with everybody,” Ainge said. “Players ten through fifteen contributing to our wins. We like the depth of the team, we like the youth of the team, we like the energy and enthusiasm of the team and I’m very anxious and excited to watch in the second half.”
 
But just like when they stood pat last year, the decision puts the onus on the players and the coaching staff to step their game up. 

“I roll with the guys in this locker room until something changes,” Isaiah Thomas said prior to the trade deadline. “I always mean that.”
 
Said Jae Crowder: “We have to take care of what we can control and that’s night-in and night-out, try to get wins.”

Blakely: Celtics make a healthy choice in standing pat at the deadline

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Blakely: Celtics make a healthy choice in standing pat at the deadline

BOSTON -- For the second year in a row, the NBA trade deadline has come and gone with the Boston Celtics making no moves.
 
The Celtics were focused on trying to land either Chicago’s Jimmy Butler or Indiana’s Paul George, but Boston’s efforts never gained momentum in the final hours leading up to Thursday’s 3 p.m. trade deadline.

Boston’s inability to strike a deal is in sharp contrast to what teams surrounding them did during this trade season. 
 
The Cleveland Cavaliers are the team Boston and the rest of the East are chasing. They acquired Kyle Korver earlier this month, a player who ranks among the NBA’s all-time great 3-point shooters. 
 
Washington added Bojan Bogdanovic from Brooklyn today, providing some much-needed firepower for a Wizards second unit that ranks among the NBA’s lowest scoring groups. 
 
Toronto recently traded for Orlando’s Serge Ibaka, giving the Raptors a defensive-oriented big man who can stretch the floor. 
 
Also today, the Atlanta Hawks picked up Ersan Illyasova from Philadelphia, which should help them space the floor better.
 
Each of those teams addressed a very specific need, something the Celtics were hoping to do. 
 
But Boston had some very clear parameters from which they refused to budge. 
 
The Celtics were not interested in giving up significant assets for a 25-game rental player who would most likely be a reserve playing limited minutes. 
 
In addition, the Celtics were hesitant to break up a core group that’s playing well despite key members of that core being limited or unavailable for long stretches altogether. 
 
Regardless of the rationale behind standing pat, the Celtics will be criticized in some circles for not making a deal that would have better positioned them to make a run at Cleveland or better solidify their standing as the No. 2 team in the East. 
 
But just like when they stood pat last year, the decision puts the onus on the players and the coaching staff to step up their games. 
 
Danny Ainge’s decision to keep this group intact speaks to some degree about the confidence he has in them to continue to get better. 
 
But they still may bolster their roster depending on whether recently-traded Andrew Bogut reaches a buyout agreement and thus becomes a free agent who can then sign with any team of his choosing.
 
Bogut was traded to Philadelphia from Dallas, along with Justin Anderson to Philadelphia for Everett native Nerlens Noel.