Milicic (wrist) contemplates cortisone shot

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Milicic (wrist) contemplates cortisone shot

PHILADELPHIA It's a good thing that Danny Ainge made adding lots of big men a priority this season.

Because it's looking more and more like he'll need them all.

Darko Milicic has played with a strained ligaments injury in his right wrist for a while that was re-aggravated in Boston's 107-75 loss to Philadelphia on Monday.

The pain is so severe now that he's contemplating having a cortisone shot to help alleviate the pain.

"I'm thinking about it," Milicic told CSNNE.com. "It (the pain) went away and I forgot about it. And I landed on it, and I got hit on it, and got hit on it and some other stupid (bleep) the pain keeps coming back."

The pain has been there for a while, Milicic said.

But now it's to the point where the pain has limited his wrist's mobility.

"I can't do this," says Milicic, as he tries to turn his wrist clock-wise and then, counter clock-wise.

"I can't move it up either," he adds, as he holds his hand palms down, and tries to bend the wrist upwards.

Sitting out and letting it rest is another option, but Milicic is quick to shoot that down.

"It's not really one of the options I want to take," he said. "We'll see."

Milicic has been among the Celtics' biggest surprises thus far in camp. With Chris Wilcox out indefinitely with a back injury, Milicic has played his way into the regular big man rotation off the bench along with rookie Jared Sullinger.

If the Celtics decide to shut him down for some or all of the remainder of the preseason, that likely means more playing time for veteran big man Jason Collins and Sullinger, who is also in the hunt to start for the C's at power forward.

LeBron James hasn't always been dominant the game after a bad performance

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LeBron James hasn't always been dominant the game after a bad performance

Conventional wisdom has been spreading almost from the moment Avery Bradley's shot (finally) dropped through the cylinder in the closing seconds Sunday night, and it goes something like this:

LeBron James was so bad in Game 3 that, determined to exact revenge, he's going to come out like a force of nature and obliterate the Celtics in Game 4.

Makes sense. But, you know, LeBron has had other playoff games in which he's scored fewer than 12 points. He's always been good the next time out -- certainly better than >12 points -- but nothing sweeping or historic:

And amazingly enough, his teams lost two of those three games.

So if you were thinking the Celtics' Game 3 triumph virtually guaranteed a Cavalier victory and a dominant LeBron James performance in Game 4 . . . well, maybe not.

Amir Johnson a game-time decision for Game 4 with shoulder injury

Amir Johnson a game-time decision for Game 4 with shoulder injury


CLEVELAND – Brad Stevens won’t know until shortly before tip-off tonight if he will have to make another lineup change.
 
Amir Johnson, whose right shoulder was injured in the Celtics' 111-108 Game 3 win on Sunday, is questionable for tonight’s Game 4.
 
“It’s better for sure,” Johnson told CSN this morning. “Yesterday, it was hard to lift. Today, I can move it all around. In shoot-around, I’m going to get a couple shots, see how it feels and go from there.
 
He added, “it’s definitely going to be a game-time decision. I’m going to go and shoot around, just to get a feel. And then for the game-time, I’ll shoot around some more, see how it feels and take it from there.”
 
Healthy or not, Johnson being with the starting group is far from a given.
 
The 6-foot-9 veteran has consistently been the first starter subbed out and usually winds up playing the fewest minutes.
 
In Game 3, two of his backups – Kelly Olynyk (15 points) and Jonas Jerebko (10 points) – shined brightly.
 
Here are some other highlights from the Celtics’ morning shoot-around.
 
THOMAS UPDATE: Isaiah Thomas met with a hip specialist on Monday, according to Stevens. “Still collecting information,” said Stevens, adding, “We’ll wait and see or we’ll discuss second, and third, and fourth, and fifth opinions.”

Thomas injured his right hip March 15 and later re-aggravated it in the first half of the Game 2 loss Friday. Less than 24 hours later, he was deemed out for the remainder of the playoffs.
 
He was replaced by Marcus Smart in the starting lineup and Smart responded with a career-high 27 points in Game 3, which included seven made 3’s which is a career-best mark as well.
 
BOUNCE-BACK CELTICS: The Celtics winning Game 3 sent shockwaves throughout the league, especially coming on the heels of a 44-point home court drubbing at the hands of the Cavs. “If you’re in sports long enough you’re going to have clunkers,” Stevens said. “You’re going to have games that don’t go your way. And our guys took seriously the idea of responding and just playing the next possession as well as they could.”
 
ROZIER HOMECOMING: The second-year guard grew up in nearby Youngstown, Ohio (75 miles southeast of Cleveland), so you can expect he’ll have a decent contingent of fans at tonight's game.
 
While he’s all-in for the Celtics, the same is not true of his friends and some family members.
 
“My family does a good job of staying on my side except for my one younger cousin,” Rozier said. “She loves LeBron.”