Boston Celtics

Garnett proves he can still score when called upon

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Garnett proves he can still score when called upon

By A.Sherrod Blakely
CSNNE.com

BOSTON Kevin Garnett has amassed more points than all but 24 players to ever play in the NBA.

And yet when folks talk about Garnett and the impact he has on the Boston Celtics, it seems to always begin and end with defense.

Garnett doesn't mind, of course.

He'll be the first to tell you that it's his defense, more than anything else, that defines who he is as a player.

But every now and then, KG reminds us all that when motivated, he can score with the best of them.

Garnett put on a scoring clinic in helping the Celtics sweep the Knicks out of the playoffs.

In the decisive Game 4 matchup at Madison Square Garden against the New York Knicks, Garnett scored a team-high 26 points, which included six of the C's last eight points, to secure a 101-89 win.

With a second-round series likely to begin this weekend against the Miami Heat, similar efforts might be needed from the Big Ticket.

However, you're not going to see or hear Garnett demand the ball.

If anything, he'll demand to switch out defensively on a red-hot player on the other team, like he did in Game 2 when New York's Carmelo Anthony lit up the Celtics for 42 points in a losing effort.

When it comes to scoring, Garnett is more likely to be talked into being more of a scorer, than him actually taking the initiative and command the ball be thrown to him.

Sunday's Game 4 win over the Knicks was no exception.

"I don't get on Kevin often, but on Sunday . . . he was so pass-conscious because of the trapping," coach Doc Rivers said. "We had times where there were point guards on him. We just wanted him to be aggressive."

Being aggressive is not an issue for Garnett. You see it in the way he defends. But when it comes to scoring, Garnett tends to defer to his teammates.

Washington Wizards coach Flip Saunders used to coach Garnett in Minnesota. He wasn't the least bit surprised at Garnett's willingness to get shots for teammates as opposed to himself after being traded to Boston.

"He doesn't care about points," Saunders told CSNNE.com. "Defense is what drives him, what makes him who he is."

But at 6-foot-11, Garnett has the ability to score around the basket with the best of them, in addition to knocking down jumpers in pick-and-pop situations.

And just in case you forgot, Garnett delivers a performance like the one he had in Game 4 to serve as a reminder.

"People forget, the guy can score," said Celtics forward Jeff Green. "He's been doing it his whole career. He's known for his passion that he brings to the game and his defensive intensity. But if you leave him open, he's going to knock down the shot."

A. Sherrod Blakely can be reached atsblakely@comcastsportsnet.com.Follow Sherrod on Twitter at http:twitter.comsherrodbcsn

Kyrie Irving says details of relationship with LeBron is 'not anybody’s business'

Kyrie Irving says details of relationship with LeBron is 'not anybody’s business'

CANTON, Mass. – LeBron James has embraced the fact that Kyrie Irving has moved on, but you get a sense that there’s still a bit of ‘what if. . .?” that James is still thinking about.

"I was wondering if there was something I could have did better to make him not want to be traded," James told reporters during Cleveland’s Media Day on Monday. "Is it the way the season finished, or, was it me coming back in the first place? Was it the coaching changes or the GM change, or, I don't know. I had so many different emotions go through my head."

When told about James wondering if there was something he could have done better to not make him ask for a trade, Irving responded, “Yeah.”

Irving declined to get into specifics, saying, “If we ever have that conversation, I don’t think it’s for anybody but me and him.”

He added, “Even if there are things, it’s really not anybody’s business. It’s between two men. That’s really where it is.”

Irving, a four-time All-Star in his six seasons with the Cavs, asked for a trade request in July.

Cleveland talked to several teams, and were seemingly focused on trying to send him to a team in the Western Conference.

While there was considerable interest, the Cavs didn’t see any deals come across their desk to their liking which is when they rekindled conversations with Boston.

After initially coming to terms of a trade, Cleveland was concerned that Isaiah Thomas’ still-on-the-mend hip injury was more serious than they had initially thought and asked for additional compensation in the form of a first-round pick.

The Celtics indicated during their initial talks that Thomas might not be ready at the start of the season. His timetable still remains uncertain, but reports out of Cleveland indicate that he may be ready to play prior to January.

Both Boston and Cleveland found a happy medium with the trade eventually being Irving to Boston in exchange for Thomas, Jae Crowder, Ante Zizic, a 2018 unprotected first-round pick from Brooklyn along with a 2020 second-round pick Boston got from Miami, that they conveyed to the Cavs.

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Horford: 'Trying to figure out the best way to help' after Hurricane Maria

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Horford: 'Trying to figure out the best way to help' after Hurricane Maria

CANTON, Mass. –  Hurricane Maria ravaged a number of Caribbean Islands, including the Dominican Republic – the home of Boston Celtics big man Al Horford.

“My immediate family is OK,” Horford told CSNNE.com during Boston’s Media Day on Monday. “But we look at everything in the big picture. We were very lucky in comparison to Puerto Rico, the U.S. Virgin Islands, a lot of smaller islands.”

Hurricane Maria hit the Dominican Republic with heavy wind and rain but delivered a much more powerful punch to other islands.

Puerto Rico has been devastated by the storm which has knocked out most of the electricity on the island along with heavy flooding.

The U.S. Virgin Islands was hit hard as well.

While the Dominican Republic wasn’t hit quite as hard as some other islands, they too are going through what’s likely to be an extended recovery period.

“We do have a lot of flooding,” Horford said of the Dominican Republic. “There’s a lot of need.”

Horford intends to address that need in some capacity.

“Right now, we’re trying to figure out the best way to help down there,” he said. “We want to make sure whatever we do as far as money and help-wise, it’s going to the people in need.”

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