Boston Celtics

Chris Mannix: Why a sign-and-trade for Gordon Hayward makes sense for Celtics

Chris Mannix: Why a sign-and-trade for Gordon Hayward makes sense for Celtics

The Boston Celtics and Utah Jazz's potential sign-and-trade, involving Gordon Hayward and Jae Crowder, has left some scratching their heads.

What would the Celtics want in return?

"They wouldn't be looking for much," The Vertical's Chris Mannix said on "Boston Sports Tonight" Wednesday.

So, if the Celtics already agreed to terms on a deal with Hayward, why would they give up practically nothing for Crowder?

"There are a lot of machinations to this deal, and how you'd clear enough salary cap space to acquire Gordon Hayward is to move a big salary, like a Jae Crowder," Mannix said. "The Celtics were on the phone with a number of teams, talking about Marcus Smart, talking about Avery Bradley, trying to take the temperature to see what they can get back. To make this deal happen quickly -- and they do have to make this deal happen quickly -- putting Jae Crowder in the deal is an easy way to clear some of that cap space and create a roster spot for Gordon Hayward."

Hayward and Boston agreed to a four-year, $128 million contract, according to The Vertical. Crowder is playing on a five-year, $35 million deal.

Celtics Storylines: Four factors that will impact ball movement

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Celtics Storylines: Four factors that will impact ball movement

Since Brad Stevens arrived in Boston, sharing the ball has been a strength of the Celtics. But this is a different season and a different roster.

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Photo of Celtics' 1963 White House visit recalls a simpler time

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Photo of Celtics' 1963 White House visit recalls a simpler time

As the controversy raged Saturday over President Donald Trump's tweet rescinding the White House invitation to Golden State Warriors' star Stephen Curry, a tweeted photo recalling a simpler time for sports team's presidential visits appeared. 

The nostalgic Twitter account @the_60s_at_50 posted a photo from the Celtics' visit to 1600 Pennsylvania Ave and its principal occupant, John F. Kennedy, on Jan. 31, 1963. JFK had invited his hometown NBA team into the Oval Office for what seemed to be a spur-of-the-moment visit.

A newspaper account of the visit was also posted. The defending NBA champion Celtics were in the Washington area to play the Cincinnati Royals at the University of Maryland's Cole Field House that night and had been taking a tour of the White House when Kennedy invited them in. 

All the team members were there except for star center Bill Russell, who, of course, experienced incidents of racism in Boston that were well-documented. However, Russell's absence was blamed on him oversleeping. His teammates said they didn't know they would meet Kennedy on the tour.  

And yes, that's Celtics legend - and CSN's own - Tommy Heinsohn second from right. Coach Red Auerbach is next to the President on the left, Bob Cousy is next to Auerbach and John Havlicek is the first player in the second row on the left.