Celtics falter down the stretch, fall to Heat, 97-87

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Celtics falter down the stretch, fall to Heat, 97-87

By A.Sherrod Blakely
CSNNE.com

MIAMI In the first half, Jermaine O'Neal headed to the Boston Celtics locker room so that he had room to stretch his aching back.

He would have done it courtside, but Rajon Rondo, playing with a recently dislocated left elbow, needed some room to stretch his aching back.

And on the bench sat Shaquille O'Neal, whose right Achilles and calf injuries have limited him to 12 minutes played - that's total, not per game - in the playoffs.

Those injuries served as a microcosm of sorts for the kind of season this has been for the Celtics, a season that ended with Wednesday's 97-87 Game 5 loss to the Miami Heat.

Boston once again fought the good fight, but the Heat were too strong and too determined to dethrone the Eastern Conference champions in their weakened state. As a result, Miami advances to the Eastern Conference finals after winning the best-of-seven series with Boston, four games to one.

Throughout the series, the Celtics had problems closing out quarters.

Game 5 was no different, as Miami mounted a 16-0 run to end the game.

After the game, the Celtics locker room was virtual ghost town with most of the players - including Kevin Garnett - heading to the team bus prior to the media being allowed to enter the locker room.

"This is a tough pill to swallow," said captain Paul Pierce, who had just 12 points on 5-for-12 shooting from the field. "We had expectations beginning of the year. Right now, I'm just . . . really upset. I wish I could have played better tonight. Unfortunately, we came up on the short end of the stick."

Similar to Game 4, the Celtics spent most of the game with the lead.

But just like Game 4, things started to unravel for the C's in the final few minutes of play.

After a series of defensive stops by both teams, the Heat finally got a glimmer of hope that they could rally for the win after James Jones nailed a 3-pointer that cut Boston's lead to 87-85 with 3:43 to play.

"That shot was huge," said Heat guard Dwyane Wade, who led all scorers with 34 points. "We were right there on the cusp, but we could not get over the hump. When he shot it, I was like, 'We need this one to go in,' and once it went in you could feel the momentum shift to our side, and then from there LeBron James went off and led us to the win."

James had 33 points, including the final 10 of the game.

Despite winning four of the five games, James praised the Celtics for a series that was a tough series.

"They pushed us every game, every second, every play, and every minute on the court," James said. "If we ever made a mistake, they made us pay for it."

Wednesday's loss not only brought a close to the season, but also raises concerns about the Big Three era in Boston, which began when Garnett and Ray Allen ajoined forces with Pierce prior to the 2007-08 season.

Since they teamed up four years ago, the C's have stood as the benchmark for Eastern Conference supremacy, a crown that will be passed on to the Heat or the Chicago Bulls, who are one victory away from meeting the Heat in the Eastern Conference finals.

Judging by the comments from coach Doc Rivers as well as other key players with the C's, there's a sense they'll try to regroup and make a run at Banner 18 with the same core group.

Rivers told reporters after the game that he's "leaning heavily to coming back" next season.

"I haven't made that decision, but I can tell you I probably will," Rivers said. "I'm a Celtic and I love our guys."

Allen has a player option to return next season, but he made his intentions clear following the loss as well.

"This has been my team," said Allen, who led all Celtics scorers in Game 5 with 18 points. "I have been full steam ahead with this team. I don't have any plans to go anywhere else."

A. Sherrod Blakely can be reached atsblakely@comcastsportsnet.com.Follow Sherrod on Twitter at http:twitter.comsherrodbcsn

Blakely: Game 4 loss shows just how much Celtics miss Isaiah

Blakely: Game 4 loss shows just how much Celtics miss Isaiah

CLEVELAND --  Down the stretch in Game 4, the Celtics were desperate for someone, anyone, who could slow down Kyrie Irving.
 
But short of that, Boston could have used an offensive closer, too. You know, someone like Isaiah Thomas.

GAME 4: CAVS 112, CELTICS 99

 

The Celtics have relied on the two-time All-Star to carry much of the offensive burden this season, but he was almost always at his best in the fourth quarter.
 
A right hip injury knocked him out of this series after 1 1/2 games. Still, Boston managed to win Game 3 without him and, for large chunks of Tuesday night, seemed poised to beat the Cavs again on their home floor.
 
But as much as Game 4 was a reminder of just how special a talent Irving is (42 points, 21 in the third quarter when the game’s momentum swung in Cleveland's favor), it also provided a clue to the clueless who thought the Celtics were actually better without Isaiah Thomas.
 
Defensively?
 
Absolutely.
 
It’s no secret that teams go to great lengths to try and use his 5-foot-9 stature against him. And as we have seen, the deeper we get into the postseason the more trouble he and the Celtics seem to encounter from a defensive standpoint.
 
But just as we praise Irving for being such a special talent, Thomas has shown that he, too, has offensive gifts that, throughout this season, have left many fans, media and defenders befuddled as to how “the little fella” keeps coming up with one big play, one big shot after another.
 
But as we have learned, he has been dealing with a sore right hip injury for several weeks. The pain and discomfort eventually became too much to bear and so the Celtics did the right thing and shut him down.
 
Without him, the C's are still a good team that on any given night can knock off anyone, even the defending champs.
 
But as Game 4 reminded us, they need Thomas in order to be their best.
 
When Irving torched Boston’s entire defense with jumpers, ankle-breaking crossovers, Euro-step lay-ups and free throws, the Celtics had no one to turn to who could maybe, just maybe, go back at Irving at the other end of the floor.
 
That's what Thomas does that makes him such a special, unique talent in this league.
 
He can score in a variety of ways, with the best in the NBA.
 
We saw that this past season, when he led all players in the Eastern Conference in scoring with a 28.9 points-per-game average.
 
Boston’s excellent ball movement and high assist numbers are certainly important to the team’s success. But to make a deep and meaningful playoff run, you need one or two guys who can just go get buckets regardless of what the opponent does defensively.
 
That’s not Avery Bradley.
 
That’s not Al Horford.
 
That’s not Kelly Olynyk.
 
You can search, poke and prod this roster all you want, and you'll come up empty when it comes to finding a player like that . . . other than Isaiah Thomas.
 
The fact the Celtics were able to avoid getting swept is a victory of sorts in itself. Boston’s coaching staff, as well as the front office, has repeatedly said that as talented as their team is, they aren’t on the same level of the defending champion Cavaliers.
 
And yet here we are four games into this series and the Celtics are basically a bad half of basketball away from being tied, 2-2.
 
It says a lot about their mental toughness, their ability to handle and navigate past adversity to give themselves a chance to be competitive against any team -- including the Cavs.
 
But their success this season has always been about the collective group, regardless of how many late-game shots Isaiah Thomas knocks down.
 
And while he has his shortcomings defensively, not having him available is going to hurt them in those late-game moments when they need a closer. It’s not a coincidence the Celtics were just 2-4 when he didn’t play during the regular season.
 
So as cool as it was for them to win Game 3 without Thomas, he’s still the straw that stirs the Celtics emotionally, bringing them to levels few think they're capable of reaching.
 
They were able to get by for one night without him, but remember this: It took Marcus Smart having an Isaiah Thomas-like game of 27 points and seven made 3’s, for them to win.
 
No one did anything remotely close to that Tuesday night.
 
They looked like the Isaiah Thomas-less Celtics, which is a look they don’t need this time of year.
 
Because that look is so not about winning.

 

Celtics miss an opportunity in first half with LeBron in foul trouble

Celtics miss an opportunity in first half with LeBron in foul trouble

CLEVELAND – There are 240 minutes of play in an NBA game, but Boston’s 112-99 Game 4 loss to Cleveland came down to seven (six minutes and 46 seconds to be precise).

That would be the amount of time left in the second quarter that LeBron James spent on the bench with four personal fouls (a first for him in the first half of an NBA playoff game ever) and Boston ahead by 10 points.

Boston could not have asked for a better scenario than that, especially considering how well they had played up to that point in the game and again, knowing that James wasn’t about to set foot back on the court until the third quarter.

But here’s the problem.

Boston’s 10-point lead when James left with four fouls.

Halftime rolled around and Boston’s lead was still at just 10 points.

Celtics players agreed that not finding a way to increase their lead with James out was among the more pivotal stretches of play in Game 4.

“They did a really good job of not letting it (the 10-point lead) get out of control while he was on the bench,” Boston’s Marcus Smart told CSNNE.com. “Every time we scored, they came back and scored.  They answered back with everything we answered.”

While many will point to that stretch as a time when the Celtics failed to make the necessary adjustments to increase their chances of winning, it wasn’t as if the Cavs are a one-man team.

“They still have two All-Stars out on the court,” said Boston’s head coach Brad Stevens, referring to Kyrie Irving and Kevin Love. “With the best player in the world they go to unreal, but they’re still a pretty darned good team when those guys are out there.”

Irving had a playoff career-high 42 points which included him scoring 12 of Cleveland’s 14 points in the final 6:46 of the second with James on the bench.

“He’s one of the best point guards in the NBA, and you know, you can tell he puts in a lot of work in his game, a lot of respect from myself, my teammates,” said Avery Bradley. “We have to do a better job at defending him as a unit, trying to make everything hard on him. He definitely got a great rhythm going tonight, and I felt like we had a chance to make it harder on him.”

James still finished with a strong stat line for the night – 34 points, six assists, five rebounds and a blocked shot.

As good as he was on the court, the Celtics have to be kicking themselves for not doing more with the time James on the bench in the second quarter which in hindsight, was among the bigger factors in them now returning home facing elimination as opposed to being tied at two games apiece in this series.

“What are you going to do?” said Cleveland’s Kevin Love. “You have to continue to fight through it. At halftime, we were down 10. We made some adjustments on the defensive end and we just fought; we needed to. They got everything out of us tonight in that second half, but we played more inspired basketball as well.”