Wakeup Call: Break up the Blackhawks!

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Wakeup Call: Break up the Blackhawks!

Here's your wakeup call -- a combination of newsworthy andor interesting tidbits -- for Monday, February 11:

BASEBALL
Not so fast on that King Felix extension . . . and for the worst possible reason. (NBC's Hardball Talk)

As the PED scandal laps at his feet, Ryan Braun has one strong defender: His manager, Ron Roenicke. (AP)

First Dice-K, and now Jason Giambi. If this was 2007, Terry Francona would have quite the team there in Cleveland. (AP)

Armando Galarraga's not too proud to accept a minor-league deal as he tries to work his way back to the majors. (AP)

Looks like old friend Derek Lowe is, though. (Hardball Talk)

The Cubs are confident Carlos Marmol will be cleared of the assault allegations he's facing in the Dominican Republic. (CSN Chicago)

Problems? What problems? Tim Lincecum and Buster Posey don't have any problems. Right, boys? (CSN Bay Area)

COLLEGE BASKETBALL
Indiana rebounds from its upset loss with an impressive 13-point victory at No. 10 Ohio State. (AP)

Still, it may not be enough to prevent the Hoosiers from losing the No. 1 ranking to Duke . . . despite the Blue Devils' skin-of-their-teeth escape at, of all places, Boston College. (NBC's College Basketball Talk)

Speaking of Duke, Seth Curry's 18-point performance at BC put him and his brother, Stephen, at the top of the Division I siblings scoring list. And I'll bet you didn't even know there was such a thing, did you? (CSN Bay Area)

Any outside chance Arizona might have had to leap seven spots to the top went up in smoke at the hands of Cal. And at Tucson, no less. (AP)

All this poll talk is well and good, but the landscape for tournament time may have changed with the return of Syracuse's James Southerland. (College Basketball talk)

Pretty good week for Illinois, wouldn't you say? (AP)

COLLEGE FOOTBALL
The Paterno family goes public with a detailed critique to the Freeh report on the Jerry Sandusky scandal, calling it a "rush to injustice". (AP)

But Dan Wetzel calls it a "a masterful testament to unnecessary declarative statements, the creation of straw men and everything else one gets when lawyers are hired by wealthy clients to prepare a 'thorough' report" that does "little to nothing to suggest that Paterno didn't know" Sandusky was sexually molesting young boys. (Yahoo! Sports)

For his part, Louis Freeh isn't impressed with the Paternos' "self-serving report." (NBC's College Football Talk)

In the end, this bickering over the Paterno legacy is ugly. And sad. (CSN Philly)

If you remember Mr. Inside and Mr. Outside, Doc Blanchard and Glenn Davis, then you probably remember Doug Kenna, the quarterback of those great Army teams of the '40s. He died Jan. 28 at the age of 88. (AP)

Cam Cameron, whose firing as Ravens' offensive coordinator -- coincidentally or not -- seemed to spark Baltimore's run to the Super Bowl, apparently is resurfacing at LSU. (CSN Baltimore)

GOLF
Your weekend winners: Brandt Snedeker at Pebble Beach . . . (AP)

. . . Rocco Mediate in his Champions Tour debut . . . (AP)

. . . Richard Sterne in the Joburg Open . . . (AP)

. . . and 15-year-old Lydia Ko in the New Zealand Women's Open. (AP)

Ko, an amateur who now has won three professional titles in 53 weeks, should create quite the stir when she makes her arrival at next week's LPGA season opener. (golfchannel.com)

HOCKEY
If anyone still doesn't believe in the Blackhawks, consider: They remain undefeated, at 10-0-2, after completing a two-week, 4-0-2 road trip with a 3-0 win over the Predators. (CSN Chicago)

Not at that level, but still hot, are the Devils, who beat the Penguins, 3-1, for their fifth victory in a row. (AP)

I don't know why Mike Babcock thinks getting the game-winning goal with five seconds to play is "ugly," but beauty's in the eye of the beholder, I guess. (AP)

Now that the labor problems are settled, the NHL and NHLPA are talking realignment again. (NHL's Pro Hockey Talk)

The Maple Leafs' Mikhail Grabovski is being called in on the carpet for allegedly biting Max Pacioretty. Have the good citizens of Montreal called 9-1-1 yet? (AP)

ESPN Boston did what? Oh, wait . . . wrong Joey McDonald. (AP)

OLYMPICS
Lindsey Vonn is "resting comfortably" after undergoing surgery to repair torn ACL and MCL and a fractured lateral tibial plateau, all of which she injured in a horrific fall in Austria last week. (NBC's Olympic Talk)

PRO BASKETBALL
Not often we root for LeBron and the Heat around here, but old habits die hard. (AP)

When the Clippers are healthy -- which, to be fair, they weren't when they were here last week -- they're quite the handful. Just ask the Knicks. (AP)

As are the Spurs, even without Tim Duncan and Manu Ginobili. Just ask the Nets. (AP)

Hey, the Magic finally won one! (AP)

Trade winds: The Nets are going hard after the Hawks' Josh Smith . . . (NBC's Pro Basketball Talk)

. . . and the Suns want the Knicks' Iman Shumpert. (Pro Basketball Talk)

Not without deer antler spray -- or something -- he couldn't. (Pro Basketball Talk)

PRO FOOTBALL
The Super Bowl champion traditionally hosts the next season's opener on the Thursday after Labor Day, but the Ravens are going to need some cooperation from the Orioles for that to happen this year. (CSN Baltimore)

Ray Lewis' departure means the Ravens need a new leader. Terrell Suggs graciously says he'll share the job with Joe Flacco. (NBC's Pro Football Talk)

Even though University of Kansas coach Mark Mangino doesn't usually defend his former cornerback, Aqib Talib, he takes issue with the notion that Talib doesn't work hard. (Pro Football Talk)

Hey, Dolphins. Reggie Bush wants to know: Where's the love? (Pro Football Talk)

Rob Ryan and the Saints make official the worst-kept secret in the NFL. (AP)

The growing national sentiment for gun-law reforms got five big-name supporters in Emmett Smith, Deion Sanders, Michael Irvin, LaDainian Tomlinson and Marshall Faulk. (AP)

TENNIS
Normally you wouldn't call losing in both the singles and doubles finals "very positive," but just being back on the court was the big victory for Rafael Nadal. (AP)

And now that he's back in the spotlight, he took the opportunity to rail against those, in any sport, who use performance-enhancing drugs. (AP)

U.S. coach Mary Joe Fernandez says she's "really proud" of her team despite its first-round ouster from the Fed Cup. (AP)

Morning Skate: Do Caps have mental block come playoff time?

Morning Skate: Do Caps have mental block come playoff time?

Here are all the links from around the hockey world, and what I’m reading, while thinking about and praying for the people of Manchester, England. It’s obviously an evil, cowardly act to bomb any public place, but to do it at a concert filled with women and children is the lowest of the low.

*The Capitals players are acknowledging that there’s some kind of mental block with the Stanley Cup playoffs. CSN Mid-Atlantic has all the details.

*It’s been a very odd postseason for the NHL where there are so many non-traditional teams still alive with the Nashville Predators in the Stanley Cup Fina, and the Ottawa Senators fighting for their lives in the Eastern Conference Final. On that note, there is a ton of disappointment at the empty seats at the Canadian Tire Centre for Ottawa’s home games in the playoffs. It sounds like there are going to be empty seats tonight for a do-or-die Game 6 in Ottawa. That is an embarrassment for a Canadian city that’s supposed to pride itself on their love of hockey. Let’s hope the Senators fans have a last-minute surge to buy tickets and show some appreciation for a Senators team that’s given the Ottawa fans a totally unexpected ride through the postseason this spring. I mean, Erik Karlsson at the top of his game is worth the price of admission all by himself.  

*The Pittsburgh Penguins have the Senators on the ropes, and it’s been an impressive showing given that they’re doing it without Kris Letang.

*Pro Hockey Talk has the ownership for the St. Louis Blues giving their GM Doug Armstrong a vote of confidence.

*Another early exit from the playoffs is going to start making some players expendable on the New York Rangers roster.

*Here’s a good piece on how David Poile built the Nashville Predators, who have reached the Stanley Cup Final for the first time. Give credit where it’s due: He manned up and made a big move dealing away Shea Weber straight up for PK Subban. It’s really worked for Music City as they’ve stepped to the next level.

*Speaking of Nashville’s rise this spring in a wide open Western Conference, Pekka Rinne has silenced the critics he might have had by carrying his team to the Cup Final.

*For something completely different: Boston law enforcement is on high alert after the bombing of the Ariana Grande concert in the UK.

 

Haggerty: Reports of Seidenberg's demise were greatly exaggerated

Haggerty: Reports of Seidenberg's demise were greatly exaggerated

Hindsight is always 20/20, of course, but it appears the Bruins made a mistake buying out veteran defenseman Dennis Seidenberg from the final couple of years of his contract. 

Seidenberg just finished up a wildly successful stint with host Team Germany at the IIHF World Championships, where he was named Directorate Best Defenseman (the tournament’s best defenseman) after leading all D-men with a goal and eight points. This came after Seidenberg, at age 35, posted 5 goals and 22 points in 73 games for the Islanders, with whom he signed after being cut loose by the B's, while averaging a shade under 20 minutes per game.  Seidenberg also had an excellent World Cup of Hockey tournament for Team Europe last summer (where he was teamed once again with Zdeno Chara), thus managing to play at a high level from September all the way through May.

A faction of Bruins fans thought he was on the serious decline after the 2015-16 season and, clearly, the Bruins agreed, opting to buy him out with two more years still left on a sizable contract extension. (They owe him $2.16 million next season and then will be charged $1.16 million on their salary cap over the next two seasons.) But the B's could have used a durable, defensive warrior like Seidenberg in the playoffs, when they lost three of their top four defensemen against the Ottawa Senators. A rejuvenated Seidenberg, able to play both the left and right side, would have been a better option than Colin Miller.

The Bruins made a conscious decision to hand things over to younger defensemen like Miller, Torey Krug, Brandon Carlo and Joe Morrow in cutting ties with Seidenberg. But they also perhaps miscalculated how much Seidenberg still had left in the tank after his best season in at least three years. 

“Well, at the time we felt like [Seidenberg's] game had really dropped off to where we thought he couldn’t contribute, and we wanted to see if some younger players could come in and help us out,” Bruins president Cam Neely said at the end-of-the-season press conference earlier this month. “I’ve got to say he played well this year for Long Island. But at the time we thought it was the right move. You can’t envision us having three of our top four D’s get hurt [in the playoffs]. We went through a lot of D’s in the postseason. You can’t predict that.”

Neely is referring to the decision made after Seidenberg’s second straight minus season in Boston, when back injuries and a major knee injury had seemed to slow him down a bit. It seemed the only way to properly evaluate some of their other, younger defenseman was to cut Seidenberg loose, but one has to wonder if the Bruins would have possibly done it had they known he was still capable of playing like he did this season for the Islanders. 

Either way, the buyout of Seidenberg is an extremely legitimate second guess of Bruins management in a year where they did a lot of things right.