Trotman shines in first P-Bruins scrimmage

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Trotman shines in first P-Bruins scrimmage

NORTH SMITHFIELD, R.I. While Zach Trotman managed to get in nine AHL games under his belt last season after signing an entry-level deal with the Bruins, this was supposed to be a year of firsts for the 22-year-old blueliner.

It would be his first full pro season, his first NHL training camp and his first chance to truly make a lasting impression on the decision makers that could grant him an NHL job someday.

Well, two out of three isnt bad.

Its been a long summer, so I think everybody has been itching to get back out there, said Trotman. Its huge to be at the next level and see how everybody gets prepared at this leveljust the pace of it.

It was nice to get a few games under my belt last year just to see what this was all about, and now this is a nice little confidence-booster to get ready for the season.

While the 6-foot-4, 202-pound Trotman wont get to experience a full NHL training camp this time around, hell be with the Providence Bruins this season and he has the watchful eyes of the Bs front office and coaching staff upon him. With that in mind Trotman had an auspicious debut finishing with four points and a hat trick in a 5-1 win for the Black Team over the White team in the first scrimmage of camp.

Aside from Trotmans hat trick, Justin Florek, Chris Bourque and Carter Camper added the red lamp-lighters during the scrimmage on the second official day of camp.
Two of Trotmans goals were point shots that managed to snake through traffic in front of the net, and the third was a top shelf rocket off a nifty feed from Matthew Pistilli with Craig Cunningham driving straight to the net.

While Trotman finished with 11 goals last season for Lake Superior State before signing with the Bruins, he wasnt about to crown himself an offensive defenseman after one good day of practice.

I wouldnt say that Im an offensive defenseman, but Im more of a two-way guy, said Trotman. So getting shots through at the point and creating rebounds and tips is definitely a big part of my game. All of the forwards were giving me good passes and then stacking up down low in the zone in front of the net.

We were joking about it before the second half and Kevan Miller said why dont you just go out there and get the hat trick? Then I had a shot go in right at the start of the second half.

Here were the lines and defensemen pairings from the P-Bruins scrimmage while the coaches mixed and matched throughout:

WilsonSauve-Spooner-Bourque
MacDermid-Cunningham-Pistilli
Courtnall-Hanson-Tardif

Warsofsky-Trotman
Button-Lowery
Kipp-Exelby
Bartkowski-Miller

Hutchinson
Morrison

Hirschfeld-Camper-Caron
Robins-Whitfield-Knight
Randell-McKinnon-Florek

Krug-Cohen
Cross-Bidlevskii

Svedberg
Hunwick

Vatrano out with upper body injury, Beleskey returns tonight vs. Stars

Vatrano out with upper body injury, Beleskey returns tonight vs. Stars

BRIGHTON, Mass – The Bruins will be missing one of their regular wingers when they take the ice against the Dallas Stars on Thursday night.

Frank Vatrano missed the morning skate at Warrior Ice Arena with an upper body injury and is out for tonight’s game. That creates  an opening for Matt Beleskey to draw back in after missing the past couple of games due to the birth of his first child. The sharp-shooting Vatrano was injured at Wednesday’s practice and it sounded like a day-to-day type thing when Bruce Cassidy discussed it following morning skate.

“Frankie yesterday in practice had an upper body issue that will leave him day-to-day,” said Cassidy. “I don’t think it’s serious, but [Vatrano] will miss tonight. We’ll see where he’s at tomorrow.”

It might not be the worst time for Vatrano to reset things as well having gone goal-less in the past 14 games, and been a part of an up-and-down third line that hasn’t produced much offense lately for the Bruins. With that change out there and Tuukka Rask again being tapped for the start against the Stars, here’s the line combos and D-pairings based on morning skate:

Marchand-Bergeron-Backes

Stafford-Krejci-Pastrnak

Beleskey-Spooner-Hayes

Moore-Nash-Acciari

 
Chara-Carlo

Krug-McQuaid

Liles-K. Miller


Rask

Haggerty: Bruins plan to take it slow with McAvoy, unless . . .

Haggerty: Bruins plan to take it slow with McAvoy, unless . . .

BRIGHTON -- Nobody doubts that 19-year-old Charlie McAvoy is going to be a game-changer down the road for the Boston Bruins.

The Boston University sophomore, expected to be in the NHL next season, is the crown jewel of a draft-and-development movement led by general manager Don Sweeney over the last three years. And if McAvoy hits the ground running with the Providence Bruins over the weekend, he may even make his NHL debut with the Bruins sometime in the next 10 days, even though playing in as much as a single game with Boston this season would burn a year off his entry-level contract.

"[The NHL] is still to be determined. It will be contract first and [the AHL] as a good first step for us," said Sweeney after signing McAvoy to an ATO (Amateur Tryout Agreement). "He's made the decision to leave [college] and we're excited about that process. It leaves some options open [for McAvoy], but first and foremost gets him playing and acclimated to pro hockey."

But there's also the reality that a 19-year-old like McAvoy is going to face challenges in pro hockey. Mastering the defenseman position at the NHL level is an extremely complicated process. It's the reason we see a lot more teenage forwards take the league by storm than teenage D-men, who typically need more development time in the AHL to hone their skills at both ends of the rink.

"[The challenge] would be getting him to figure out what works at this level and what doesn't, just like if he were in Providence," said interim coach Bruce Cassidy about the theoretical possibility of McAvoy playing in Boston soon. "We've used seven defensemen here over the last eight weeks and they've done a good job for us, so we'd have to see where he fit in and go from there . . . I've seen him here and there, but I don't know enough about his individual game at this point to know what he would specifically need to do . . .

"[Defense] is a tougher position in the NHL because mistakes are magnified. If you're a forward you've got another layer of defense to support you, so you can get away with some of that stuff. I think that's why you see generally that most of the rookies that age in the NHL are forwards."

Torey Krug signed with the Bruins out of college five years ago and had a one-game cameo with them before spending the entire next season in Providence. Krug says now that, looking back, he knows he wasn't ready to play in the NHL coming out of school and needed a season to sort things out defensively against bigger, stronger, smarter and faster opponents.

"The speed itself wasn't much of an issue, but if you fall asleep even for a second it's going to turn into a scoring chance for the other team," Krug said of the adjustment from college hockey to the NHL. "These games are not easy to play in, even for veterans in the league . . .

"I thought offensively I was ready [right away], but defensively I had a lot to learn. It's a tough league to play in. Offensively it was fun, but defensively I had my share of hiccups realizing I had to go down to Providence to work on some things."

McAvoy isn't expected to follow Krug's path. He'll get development opportunities at the AHL level at the end of this season just like fellow young D-man Brandon Carlo, who used last spring's AHL experience to vault directly into the NHL this season as a 19-year-old playing top-four minutes right from opening night.

It's also the track taken by Zach Werenski last year with the Columbus Blue Jackets. An AHL playoff run fully prepped him for his breakout season as the league's best rookie defenseman.

"It's a long time ago, but I used that [ATO] myself as a benefit and I've always been an advocate of it, and I think Robbie O'Gara, Danton Heinen and Carlo all [did it]," said Sweeney. "All the players that have been able to come on and play at a very high level against men, generally in a playoff stretch drive or the playoffs themselves, it's a unique [experience].

"When you first turn pro, you're introduced to it at a really high level and you have to adjust to it on the fly. It's about structure and understanding the voices you're hearing. And reading and reacting at the pro level are all very important [skills]. [I think] it's a great on-the-job training exercise and right now Brandon is the best example of it. He's been able to jump into our lineup this year, and that's a testament to him and also the work he did last year."

So the Bruins should take their time with McAvoy, though also allow that he could be a dominant exception to the rule and become a force right out of the chute. It certainly appears Sweeney is going to leave that door ajar,  to make sure the Bruins don't miss out on anything with a young defenseman who's already drawn comparisons to Norris Trophy winner Drew Doughty.