Sources: Thomas moved family to Colorado mid-season

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Sources: Thomas moved family to Colorado mid-season

NEWARK, NJ Tim Thomas has often called New England his second home away from his hometown of Flint, Michigan.

But according to several sources, the two-time Vezina Trophy winner abruptly vacatedhis suburban home north of Boston, and moved his family to Colorado in the middle of this season.

The Bruins goaltender has been in New England for much of his hockey career. He traveled from his home state of Michigan as a teenager to play college hockey in Burlington at the University of Vermont, spent three seasons in Rhode Island as a member of the Providence Bruins and has lived in Boston for seven years after establishing himself as an All-Star goaltender for the Bruins.

He became something of a folk hero in Boston after leading his Bruins to a Stanley Cup two years ago, and he was one of the most beloved members of the Black and Gold.

Thomas permanently moved his parents to the Boston area when they both needed hospital care over the last few years. Both received cancer treatments here and thankfully recovered with the assistance of the best doctors in the country.

Thomas had established roots within the Boston community and the 38-year-old goalie seemed like the perfect candidate to remain in the Boston area after his playing career was over.

But Thomas future with the Bruins started to get a little cloudy when the White House brouhaha went down this year in January. Apparently, now the goaltender has lost that loving feeling for Boston.

His move to the more politically conservative state of Colorado might explain why Thomas has been so noncommittal when asked about retiring as a Bruin. He also wasn't very forthcoming in declaring his happiness as a member of the Bruins organization after the team fell to the Washington Capitals in the first round of the playoffs this season.

One source said that part of the reason for Thomas move was a desire to potentially work with the Team USA hockey program in Colorado Springs once his playing career was over. But that doesnt explain the odd timing of a player moving his family while the regular season was still ongoing.

While the move to Colorado doesnt make any definitive statement about Thomas future with the Bruins or lend any weight to the rumors that he may be traded once his no-trade clause is removed on July 1, it does raise questions about his overall happiness and comfort level in the place where he became an NHL star.

It remains to be seen if Thomas will be in Boston come September to supply the reasons behind his unorthodox mid-season move during what was already a stressful regular season.

Bruce Cassidy: Bruins 'have got to have a stronger mental capacity' in times of adversity

Bruce Cassidy: Bruins 'have got to have a stronger mental capacity' in times of adversity

BOSTON – While there were some warning signs over the last few weeks that the Bruins might be getting away from their game, it didn’t really hit home until Thursday night’s frustrating loss to the Tampa Bay Lightning. 

The Bruins blew through three different one-goal leads in the second period in the 6-3 loss to the Bolts at TD Garden, and each time surrendered a tying goal to Tampa in less than two minutes after initially scoring. It was a clear indicator that the Bruins weren’t fully focused on the task at hand despite having already lost three games in a row, and that their ability to bounce back from adversity is going away from them again. 

That much was obvious when the bottom dropped out in the third period, and Jonathan Drouin and Nikita Kucherov turned into a two-man Lightning wrecking crew outscoring the Bruins by a 3-0 margin in the final 20 minutes. 

“I think the frustration is more in-game, where we’ve got to have a stronger mental capacity to handle those [challenging] situations in-game. Let’s face it, when you get on a bit of a losing streak, all those things creep in, whether it’s in October or whether it’s in March,” said Bruce Cassidy. “You have doubts, you start pressing, and again, it’s my job to alleviate the kind of attention in those situations.

“But, as I told you, we all have to be accountable and be responsible for ourselves, and that’s where we just need to have better focus and better discipline in those areas. It was there when it was 3-3 [on the scoreboard]. We’ve got to push back after they score, and that’s where I thought we started to come apart a little bit where we should’ve stuck together and stuck with the program. [We needed to] get ourselves slowly back into the game. We had 10 minutes to even the score, and we weren’t able to do it.”

Clearly this wasn’t just the coach alone in his pointed observations, however, as the lack of focus showed unfortunately in a rudderless second period for the Black and Gold where they couldn’t gain any separation from Tampa Bay despite scoring three goals. 

“[It’s] not being focused, not being sharp, and obviously at this time of the year it’s unacceptable, and it’s up on us to be better,” said Bruins captain Zdeno Chara. “Those kinds of situations shouldn’t happen. So, for sure, we need to address those things and hold each other accountable.”

One thing is clear: The Bruins have a lot of work to do if they hope to avoid the same kind of late season tailspin that doomed them each of the last two seasons, and already seems to be happening over their last four losses to varying levels of hockey talent. 

Talking points: Tuukka Rask wasn't good enough vs. Lightning

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Talking points: Tuukka Rask wasn't good enough vs. Lightning

Here are the talking points from the Boston Bruins' 6-3 loss to the Tampa Bay Lightning.