Seguin plays through knuckle tendon injury, will require surgery

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Seguin plays through knuckle tendon injury, will require surgery

Tyler Seguins explosion at the end of the playoff series against the Washington Capitals seems all the more remarkable when it was learned hell likely need offseason surgery.

Seguin showed an enlarged knuckle on his left hand middle finger that indicated a displaced tendon injury suffered during Bostons last trip through Florida in March, and something he played through pain with during the postseason.

Asked he had taken a couple of painkilling shots to get through the postseason, Seguin smiled and said I think everybody was doing a little something by the time the playoffs rolled around.

Its hard to feel good about what happened, but getting a feel for the playoffs was something I was happy about."

Seguin finished with two goals in the final two playoff games against the Capitals after getting shut down for the first five games of the series, and said it definitely bothered him at points after it originally happened. The 20-year-old also said the injury would require surgery before he jumps back into his offseason training program with BioSteel Sports up in Toronto. He may try to participate in World Championships before getting his hand worked on, but its definitely an inevitability for the youngster.

I have to talk to the doctors, but Ill definitely need something. In the first period during my second shift the tendon came out. It was one of those things that I had to playing through at the end of the season and the playoffs, said Seguin. It wasnt going to get any worse, so as long as I could bear the pain. Its a couple of weeks of recovery after I get it done.

It wasnt anything that was going to keep me from playing. At the time I was going to miss a few games. I was a game time decision against Philly during that game in our building when we ended up winning in the shootout. But I didnt end up missing any time.

Clearly the youngster was happy with the way things ended for him after getting an overtime game-winner in Game 6 and serving as one of the teams best forwards in the decisive Game 7. But he was also among a group of top six forwards that didnt get it done consistently enough to defeat a gritty Capitals crew that never back down.
Seguin also wants much more involvement on the power play moving forward, and that can mean nothing but good things for the Bruins.

The power play has always kind of been my thing, said Seguin. During my whole life Ive always liked the power play and its always been a part of my game. While Im still gaining experience I think Ill be finding even more spots on the power play. Its something I can only improve on.

The Bs leading scorer said he hopes to take on more of the Marc Savard role on the man advantage off the half-wall where he can use his versatile skill to serve as a triple threat when he curls and drags: he can shoot with deadly accuracy, find open teammates with passes all over the ice or taking the puck straight to the net.
Thats what Im hoping for. Its still a lot different than juniors where I always thought was kind of my go to in juniors. At the NHL level theres that learning factor and finding spots on the ice.

Coming a season where he was Bostons leading scorer and an All-Star performer, power play magician for a unit that went 2-for-23 against the Capitals might be the next rabbit to be pulled out of the youngsters hat.

Don Sweeney: Bruins 'lost a good player' in Colin Miller

Don Sweeney: Bruins 'lost a good player' in Colin Miller

CHICAGO – Don Sweeney said the Bruins knew and expected they were going to lose one of three players in the NHL expansion draft, and it’s pretty clear it was going to be Adam McQuaid, Kevan Miller or Colin Miller leaving the team. The B’s took Kevan Miller out of the equation by leaving him on the protection list after a strong season while also playing some of his best hockey in the playoffs.

That left McQuaid and Miller with each of the two D-men standing an equal chance of getting selected by the Vegas Golden Knights, and the 24-year-old puck-moving Miller going to Vegas for the time being. It remains to be seen if Miller sticks with the Golden Knights, or if there is an eventual plan to flip him elsewhere like perhaps an interested party in Toronto.

Sweeney said the Bruins didn’t want to lose a player with potential like Miller, but it’s also true that he would have been stuck behind younger, better D-men on the depth chart with Charlie McAvoy and Brandon Carlo as better right-handed options.

“It was an interesting process to go through. It was hard at times because you felt like other teams were able to find deals to keep their team together while you felt vulnerable in that regard,” said Sweeney at the B’s team hotel in Chicago during a Thursday availability with the media. “You knew you were going to lose a good player. You knew they had targeted three players on our team that we felt they would target, and unfortunately we’re losing a good, young player.

“We thought highly of Colin. He was part of a big trade for us and we wish him well moving forward. We thank for him doing his part with the organization. We lost a good player.”

Clearly, the Bruins lost a defenseman with skills and youth on his side, but it’s also a young guy that hasn’t put it all together yet while never posting more than 16 points in each of his two seasons with the Black and Gold. Perhaps he will put together the offensive package at his next landing spot after showing flashes in Boston over the last two years, but that unknown factor while no longer being considered a prospect is the reason he didn’t find himself on the protected D list along with Zdeno Chara and Torey Krug.  

Bruins' 2017-18 schedule has three Habs games in eight days

Bruins' 2017-18 schedule has three Habs games in eight days


The Bruins released their schedule for the 2017-18 season Thursday, with their campaign beginning at TD Garden on Oct. 5 against the Predators. 

Two things stand out in Boston’s schedule. Eleven of their final 15 games are on the road, and they don’t play the Canadiens until mid-January.  

Then, when the B’s and Habs do finally meet, they play three times in an eight-day span. The rivals face each other Jan. 13 in Montreal, Jan. 17 in Boston and Jan. 20 in Montreal. The Bruins’ final regular-season meeting with the Habs is March 3. 

To see the full schedule, click here.