Boston Bruins

Rask credits defense in front of him

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Rask credits defense in front of him

Tuukka Rask is stepping up as the starting goaltender for the Bruins so far this season. But he gives a lot of the credit to his defense.

"I think our (defense) has done a really good job blocking those shots and taking care of most of the rebounds so I got to thank them for that."

He has appeared in every game for the Bruins so far, so is fatigue setting in yet?

"A little bit." explained Rask. "It's the start of the season. I guess your legs feel a little fatigue but nothing too major."

Haggerty: Bruins have their Rask plan, and they need to stick with it

Haggerty: Bruins have their Rask plan, and they need to stick with it

The Bruins and Tuukka Rask hope they’ve refined the formula for his highest efficiency level after another season of mixed results. 

On its face, the 30-year-old would have seemed to have enjoyed a pretty good season with a career-best 37 wins and eight shutouts, the lowest goals against average (2.23 GAA) in three seasons and a strong enough finishing kick that helped push the Bruins into the playoffs. At the same time Rask tied his career-worst with a .915 save percentage and couldn’t play in a pivotal late season road game vs. the Brooklyn Islanders with their very playoff lives hanging in the balance. 

It should be mentioned, of course, that Rask did all this while dealing with a groin injury that needed offseason surgery, and helped play into his inability to maintain consistency in the second half of the season. The nagging injury and first half overuse due to shoddy backup goaltending forced Rask into 65 games last season, and it sounds like there isn’t going to be a repeat of that number moving forward in Boston. 

Rask said he’s healthy post-hip surgery and ready to go full bore when NHL training camp arrives next month, and is on board with a lighter schedule designed to get a more efficient performance out of the slender goaltender. 

“It’s good to get back and I was looking forward to skating this week, but they didn’t have the ice down at [Warrior Arena]. I think they had to pain the lines or something,” said Rask. “I think we are [on the same page]. Every season is different and there are games that vary in physical and mental strain, and you always take that into consideration with how many games you play. 

“I felt good with the [64] games that I [started] last year and didn’t feel like it was too much. If it’s 55 or 65, who knows? I think it’s going to fall between those numbers as long as everything goes the way it’s supposed to go.”

One would actually bet it’s going to be more like 55-60 games for Rask, and that will mean an increased workload for Anton Khudobin as his backup goaltender. It’s not a coincidence that Rask’s best season as a clear-cut No. 1 goaltender was also the 2013-14 season where he played just 58 games, and posted a 2.04 goals against average and .930 save percentage while winning 36 games. The other two top seasons of his NHL career were his rookie season where he appeared in 45 games while supplanting Tim Thomas as he battled his own hip problems, and the lockout season when Rask started just 34 games in an abbreviated season. 

It’s become clear to everybody involved with the Bruins that Rask is a No. 1 goaltender that needs sufficient rest, and is never going to be the Henrik Lundqvist/Cory Schneider workhorse type that’s going to lead the NHL in games started. That will maximize Rask’s effectiveness and hopefully avoid the situation that saw his save percentage dip below .900 in January and February as he hit a mental/physical wall of fatigue.

As Bruins President Cam Neely succinctly said back in April, “we’ve realized over the last couple of years that we just can’t overplay Tuukka.”  

“In the middle of the season, I thought we rode him maybe a little too hard. [Rask] broke down a little bit. Then he finished on such a high note, the player that we all know Tuukka is, and the competitor he is,” said Don Sweeney, back at the end of the year press conference. “He had some injury troubles that he was battling through the course of the season and really came back, after getting a little bit of rest, a better player. 

“He’s a big part of it if we’re going to have success that we expect to have, that he has to be the go-to guy and I think he proved that down the stretch and in the playoffs that he can be that goaltender.”

The other factor in all of this is the consistency of Khudobin, and making certain the B’s backup is ready to potentially play in 25 plus games for the Black and Gold this season. He’ll need to be better than he was last year when his struggles forced the Bruins to overplay Rask, and pushed Zane McIntyre and Malcolm Subban into emergency backup duty before they were ready for it. 

“[Khudobin] is very capable of playing great hockey. It’s just a matter of feeling confident, feeling like you’ve got the coach’s trust and then getting into a rhythm,” said Rask. “If you play every fifth or sixth game it’s tough, and you’re always kind of rebooting. So that’s not easy. Hopefully he can get into a rhythm right off the bat and we’ll get going as a good tandem.”

It sounds good in theory now to make certain Rask only plays 55-60 games this upcoming season, and it will certainly pay off in the goalie’s performance if they can stick with that strategy. But the discipline will come for the Black and Gold if the pressure comes again this season to overplay Rask at times, and risk running down a No. 1 goalie that only consistently plays like it when given a specific amount of rest during the regular season. 

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Morning Skate: Bruins not involved in Will Butcher negotiations

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Morning Skate: Bruins not involved in Will Butcher negotiations

Here are all the links from around the hockey world, and what I’m reading while getting ready for Saturday’s #ClearTheShelters Day involving personalities and employees across the NBC Universal family here in New England, and most importantly the dogs and other animals that are looking for good, loving homes across the region. If you have room in your heart for a stray or rescue dog, this weekend is a great time to make it happen. 

 

*FOH (Friend of Haggs) and PHT writer Mike Halford has a number of teams involved in the negotiations for Hobey Baker winner and suddenly free agent D-man Will Butcher, but the Bruins aren’t among them. Geez, didn’t somebody say the B’s should take a pass on this player? I wonder who that was. BTW, congrats to Halford and Jason Brough as they leave NBC and Pro Hockey Talk for other opportunities after a great run there. 

 

*Can the Maple Leafs kids avoid the sophomore slump this season after so many of them were brilliant last season in their first NHL go-round?

 

*Marc Spector says that the Leon Draisaitl negotiations will eventually end with the player coming to an agreement with the Oilers on a new contract. 

 

*Good buddy Nick Cotsonika has got the fun gig of traveling with a Golden Knights goodwill tour bus that’s traveling all over the areas around, and outside of, Nevada. 

 

*FOH (Friend of Haggs) Steve Buckley is wondering why the Bruins struggle in handling their best young players. It’s a legitimate question given their past with Seguin, Hamilton and Kessel, but let’s see what happens with David Pastrnak before totally crushing them. They know what they have, they value what they have and they’re not going to trade him. 

 

Interesting piece from Justin Bourne about how his views have changed after two seasons as an assistant coach in the Maple Leafs organization. 

 

*For something completely different: My dear Gare Bear advocates for the Celtics to trade Jayson Tatum for Kyrie Irving. Don’t you do it, Danny!