Quick hits: Reactions from Vancouver

191545.jpg

Quick hits: Reactions from Vancouver

By MaryPaoletti
CSNNE.com StaffReporter Follow@mary_paoletti
The postgame player quotes were hoarse because of the screaming.

Here are some quick hits that came through from the melee of Boston's Stanley Cup victory:

Canucks goalie and possible playoffs goat Roberto Luongo (21 GAA), was one of the first players to skate through the line of handshakes; Tim Thomas (8 GAA) was one of the last. When they reached each other Thomas leaned in: "Great series, great year, great everything. You're a great goaltender."

Surprising to no one, Thomas was announced winner of the Conn Smythe Trophy, awarded to the player deemed most valuable to his team in the postseason. Thomas finished with a .967 save percentage in the finals and a .940 percentage in the playoffs overall. He also had four shutouts and 16 wins, including three Game 7's.

Thomas: "So special, its a team effort like I said. It's about everyone in dressing room. This is why we play hockey for that Stanley Cup -- for the city of Boston. It means so much to me. Just to be a part of this team that can say we brought it back to Boston.

Bruins captain Zdeno Chara accepted the Stanley Cup from NHL commissioner Gary Bettman. After a quick skate, some kisses and unintelligible joy, Chara handed the mug to 43-year old warrior Mark Recchi -- a three-time title winner. Recchi passed the Cup to Patrice Bergeron, second assistant captain, who then got it over to Thomas.

Injured forward Nathan Horton was on the ice for the celebration in full gear, "and smiling. Always smiling," said CSN's Mike Giardi. Horton suffered a severe concussion in Game 3 of the finals on a hit by Canucks defenseman Aaron Rome.

Of the experience: "I couldn't be happier. We all knew we had it in us. People get hurt in playoffs, that's just the way it goes."

Horton on if the trade from Florida to Boston changed his life: "All year it's been an amazing year. its been very special. Obviously this here tops it off . . . Playing in Boston with such great fans."

In an interview between Mark Recchi and NBC analyst Pierre McGuire -- who was an assistant coach of the 1991 champion Penguins when Recchi was on the team -- the Bruins forward announced he will retire. Recchi had 14 goals and 34 assists in 81 regular-season games (5-9-14 in 25 playoff contests). Three Cups with three teams (Pittsburgh, Carolina in 2006) places him in elite company with Joe Nieuwendyk and Claude Lemieux.

In the locker room, champagne covered players, coaches and cameras. Chara first doused his teammates before pouring a generous amount into the Stanley Cup and lifting it to his lips. He topped it off as Recchi took a long drink. The two then shared a longer hug.

Brad Marchand's emotions didn't wait until the final horn to surface. The rookie said after his second goal, "I was starting to tear up there on the bench. We were sitting there with a few minutes left and we knew we had it . . . we accomplish something we wanted our whole life. I'm going to look back on all of this. This is all so unbelievable."

Just 10 minutes after the game ended, Giardi tweeted that there were already reports of trucks being tossed over and burned in Vancouver. "Also a slew of fights." CBC-TV later reported the streets of Vancouver "unsafe" for police and emergency vehicles because the riots of disheartened fans were blocking the way.

Mary Paoletti can be reached at mpaoletti@comcastsportsnet.com.Follow Mary on Twitter at http:twitter.comMary_Paoletti

Dupont: Why Bruins can sustain winning ways and make the playoffs

Dupont: Why Bruins can sustain winning ways and make the playoffs

Kevin Paul Dupont joins Sports Sunday to explain why he thinks the Boston Bruins winning ways are here to stay and why he thinks they will be in the playoffs.