Notes: Bruins need the killer instinct in Game 6

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Notes: Bruins need the killer instinct in Game 6

By JoeHaggerty
CSNNE.com

BOSTON The Bruins know they need to show a little killer instinct.

The Bs have been up in playoff series before, and theyve finished off the Montreal Canadiens before. But there have been times when theyve been poised to close out teams when it really matters and stumbled badly. They haven't always been able to step on another teams throat and finish them off.

We all realize the importance of that game, and we all have to bring the same mental approach that the Canadiens are going to bring, said Zdeno Chara.

Does the Bruins captain want to avoid a Game 7 situation? He has yet to win a Game 7 in his NHL career.

We have it in our hands, said Chara. The further you go, you know every game is so important. Weve been showing heart all season. We fell behind in the first two games and werent at our best. But we showed some desperation, and most of all youve got to be focused and work very hard.

The Bruins will get their opportunity on Tuesday in Game 6 at the Bell Centre thanks to the Lady Gaga tour barnstorming through Montreal on Monday. The B's know theyll be facing a Habs team backed into a corner fighting for its life. Once again itll be all about getting a quick lead on Montreal early in the game and taking the passionate crowd out of the proceedings.

I think thats been something weve had to really adjust to in this series, is making sure we dont give them an early lead, said coach Claude Julien. But when they are in that situation I think they are playing out of desperation, they are playing for their lives, you have to play that game with determination and thats the difference.

For us its about determination, for them its about desperation and you have to hope that the determination is better than their desperation. Its as simple as that.

The Bruins should be prepared for a team in desperate straits after they were in that position during the first two games of the series, and now one squad is facing elimination for the first time in an entertaining series.

The Bruins continue to be the only team in the playoffs that has yet to scratch out a power-play goal, and they sit 0-for-15 on the man advantage through the first five games while looking for something, anything to build on. Julien and assistant coach Geoff Ward made some adjustments on the PP between Games 3 and 4 when they pushed Patrice Bergeron up close to the net on the first power-play team, but that still hasnt yielded results in the last two games.

At this point the power play is clearly pressing, but theres also a setting reality that the Bs might have to soldier throughout much of the playoffs without a fully functioning special teams. So far there hasnt been much evidence that things will be any different in the immediate future.

The one thing I could tell you about the power play right now is its really, really about our guys are so tense right now, said Julien. They know just as much as you guys know. We know as coaches that our power play has not been up to par this year. The longer it goes, the tougher it gets. Somehow weve got to overcome that.

Weve got to somehow do the simple things and have the confidence to do it. When you see your best players having trouble executing, its pretty clear whats going on. Our job right now has really been to try and get them to relax and play with confidence. You got to play with confidence but you also have to outwork the PK. Somehow we got to create that situation. We are desperately working on that and trying to rectify it because we know its a major issue that we have to overcome.

Julien was asked if hes feeling any sympathy for the Western Conference's top seed Vancouver Canucks as they are will play a do-or-die Game 7 with the No. 8 seed Blackhawks.

Thats a real tough question, sympathy," said Julien. "I think I understand what theyre going through. We lived through it. You watch those games and you see how another team can grab momentum pretty quick and confidence and belief. Its there again this year. Theres an opportunity again to create what happened last year to our team for another team. Whether thats a trend thats going that way now, I dont know. But it certainly shows theres parity in this league and nothing is over until its over.

Joe Haggerty can be reached at jhaggerty@comcastsportsnet.com.Follow Joe on Twitter at http:twitter.comHackswithHaggs

Morning Skate: Larry Robinson parts ways with Sharks

Morning Skate: Larry Robinson parts ways with Sharks


Here are all the links from around the hockey world, and what I’m reading, while refraining from shoving any world leaders today.

*Larry Robinson and the San Jose Sharks are parting after working together for five seasons, per FOH (Friend of Haggs) Kevin Kurz.

*Speaking of Kurz, he also has a Sharks mailbag on which players are most likely to be traded out of San Jose during the offseason. Somebody has got to go, and you’d think it would be somebody without much tread left on the tires.

*Moving on to other topics, Anaheim Ducks center Ryan Kesler said that losing a Game 6 in the Western Conference Finals to the Nashville Predators was the “toughest” loss of his career. I don’t see how this is possible. You see, Kesler is no slouch at falling short. In fact, he’s a tremendous loser, having dropped a Game 7 of the Stanley Cup Final at home in 2011 as a member of the Vancouver Canucks, and also having lost a Gold Medal Game for Team USA at the hands of Sidney Crosby and Canada in 2010 in overtime that was also played in Vancouver. It took a simple Google search to find an actual postgame video of Kesler crying into his hockey glove on the bench in the aftermath of Game 7 vs. the Bruins. So, pardon me if I’m not buying Kesler talking about a conference finals loss as the worst of his career when he was one home win away from being a Stanley Cup champion in Game 7, and proceeded to lose like he’s done many, many times in the most important games of his career. Dude, you’ve been through tougher losses. Trust me on that one.  

*The idea of trading Alex Ovechkin might be gaining some traction with the Capitals fan base, but it doesn’t seem to be based on reality at this point.

*The pride of Melrose, Mass, Conor Sheary, delivered in Game 7 for the Penguins as they return to the Stanley Cup Final in back-to-back seasons.

*Bobby Ryan said his strategy for success in the playoffs, at least in part, was staying off the phone. Maybe he ought to try that a bit more during the regular season.

*Congrats to the folks at NBC for another successful Red Nose Day that featured a reunion of the “Love Actually” cast among other things.